Carbon Monoxide Spillage on my boiler

Baxi WM 51/3RS Boiler. Can I get this repaired and how?
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Please tell us what type of cryogenic unit you are using to cool carbon monoxide, which has a boiling point of 82K ie -191 degrees C, into a liquid so that you can spill it onto your boiler?
Alan
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wrote:

And if you *have* managed to spill iquid CO onto your boiler, how will you know, apart from maybe cracks due to localised cooling, that you have spilled any, given that it will evaporate immediately?
I wonder if you mean CO leakage from boiler (eg from flue or burner area due to incomplete combustion) rather than spillage on, which implies a liquid.
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Liquid N2, bp 77K IIRC, takes a few seconds to boil away if spilled in quantity. Pouring a thermos of unwanted liquid N2 onto the lab floor was a very quick way of redistributing the dust and fluff into the corners.
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Chris

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In article <FeOdnct-
says...

All his problems can be easily solved by giving up on that stupid rip-off web site.
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Perhaps he lives on Uranus?
Brian
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Spillage applies to gasses too. In this context it means combustion products which fail to be drawn into an open flue, and "spill" out into the room.
However, the RS in the boiler model number presumably means Room Sealed, so in this case spillage shouldn't be able to happen.
If you have CO from a room sealed appliance, it means you probably have two faults: 1) it's generating CO due to poor combustion. 2) the CO is leaking into the house somehow, either because it's not correctly room sealed, or because the CO re- enters after leaving the flue terminal.
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Andrew Gabriel
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On 21/11/16 13:35, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

Alternatively the poster is suffering from paranoid delusions.
Never discount this remote possibility. DAMHIKT...
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a car with the cramped public exposure of 
an airplane.”
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Probably.

Get a man in to service it and clean the flue.
Tim
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Please don't feed the trolls

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On Sunday, 20 November 2016 17:41:31 UTC, Tim+ wrote:

Or a woman.
Owain
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On Sunday, 20 November 2016 14:44:04 UTC, John Cashin wrote:

Clean the heat exchanger, it's probably part blocked with soot. Ensure the whole air path is clear. You need the person doing it to be competent to do it.
NT
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