Car bodywork Spray paint on timber?

Hi all. this idea popped into my noggin yesterday. Given that your average white car still looks white 20 years after it was built, is car bodywork paint suitable on timber?
Arthur
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Yes - the older cellulose paints were often used on furniture to give those high gloss results. But how well it would stand up to external use, I dunno. Modern car paints are water based. Water based external household paint should have the same sort of resistance to weathering. It was oil based paints that go yellow.
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Ahem. Well I did this when my Defender was new. Made some rear speakers for it and got the car sprayers to match the interior colour.
Now the paint was FINE, but it did not attach to the cellulose sanding sealer I had sealed the wood with..Not sure why, but after 5 years it was flaking off.
And thereby is the key point. Wood moves, and car paints do not. You MUST hermetically seal and prep the wood with compatible sealers and primers before spraying.
Now I do do this on model aircraft, to make them look stunning, but even those if they get damp will end up losing flakes.
If you must, coat your woodwork with an epoxy glass skin and then get spraying the 7-10 coats needed for a really good finish.
OTOH sometimes its easier to use a couple of coats of primer, and undercoatr and a gloss.
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If the paint wasn't cellulose - and that hasn't been used on new cars for about 20 years - you need a barrier coat between cellulose type products and the two pack or whatever.

5 years is not a bad life for *any* paint on wood exposed to the sun, etc.
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It will work fine on wood (if expensively) but don't expect the same performance outdoors from aerosol spray can car paint as you get on a car. a) the paint isn't the same, b) a lot of the failure problems with outdoor paint come from the fact that wood moves around under the paint film with changes in humidity and c) paint failure outdoors is often started by fungal attack on the wood or the paint and the best outdoor paints have fungicides in the primer and top-coats.
OTOH if you are painting e.g. toys made of MDF then car paint works well.
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On 13 July, 15:53, "Norman Billingham" <norman.at.tumulus.org.uk> wrote:

Thought as much....nearly. Thanks.
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Arthur 51 wrote:

A few years ago I saw a racing dinghy that had been done like this. _Lovely_ finish. There's got to be a reason why I've only seen it done once.
Andy
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