Cable protection

Hello,
In what circumstances does electrical cable need to be protected when buried in plaster? I am guessing that wires leading up from under the floor directly to the socket do not need any kind of protection (steel conduit for example). Is that right? I mean it would take a complete idiot to start drilling under a socket! Or maybe we have gone so far down the health and safety route that all buired cable needs protectetion?
Anyone help?
Thanks,
Graham
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On Oct 16, 3:40 pm, Graham Jones wrote:

All buried cable does need protection now, unless it's RCD'd
Or to put it the other way, RCD protection is now required for all buried cables unless they are in conduit or have an continuous earthed 'screen'
This may change with an amendment to the Regs, especially for minor alterations to existing installations.
Owain
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That would have to be earthed steel conduit.
Or be at least 50mm below the surface.
Of course plenty of idiots still drill holes above and below sockets and switches:-)
--
Adam



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On 16/10/2010 17:17, ARWadsworth wrote:

Had to tease a mate of mine once for nailing a picture rail back on a wall with masonry nails - right into the new plaster that was filling a cable chase drop to a light switch!
(by fluke it seemed he missed the cable!)
--
Cheers,

John.

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A Fluke 2042 would help him miss the cable:-)
--
Adam



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On 18/10/2010 02:11, ARWadsworth wrote:

A bit high tech for him I fear - he is more comfortable with a hammer! (which to be fair he does wield with amazing skill - the nearest equivalent to a human nail gun you are likely to find!)
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John.

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Central heating fitter, is he ?
--
geoff

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I once removed a kitchen unit to get access to the CU to find a wallplug right /through/ one of the 2.5T+E cables running up from the CU.
JGH
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In my parents old house - putting up a shelf or cabinet or something. I plugged an electric drill into a socket and then proceeded to drill a hole in the wall above the socket......
No, I have no idea what possessed me either.
--
Chris French


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chris French wrote:

When you're unblocking a sink and you've just removed the "U" bend, where do you empty it?
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On 18 Oct, 22:50, Andy Burns wrote:

Into a washing up bowl.
Which then gets emptied, oh, um, yes.
Owain
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Owain wrote:

Oh um yes WHAT? You don't need to empty the bowl until the job's done. Come to think of it, you don't even need a bowl. Just empty the U bend into the sink. With the plug in place.
Then clean out the U bend in said sink, with plenty of water. Just remember to re-connect the bend before pulling the plug!
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*grin*
I have done both of these things.
--
Today is Boomtime, the 73rd day of Bureaucracy in the YOLD 3176
“I never thought I was wasted, but I probably was.”
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On 18 Oct, 22:26, chris French wrote:

I thought it would be nice to listen to some music while I soldered the gubbins inside an old valve radio ...
Owain
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On 16/10/2010 15:40, Graham Jones wrote:

Even if it doesn't *need* it for protection - and that's moot - it's much easier to plaster over galvanised top-hat section that it is over un-covered cables.
--
Cheers,
Roger
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On 16/10/2010 17:19, Roger Mills wrote:

There's nothing particularly moot about this; the regs are quite clear.
No mechanical protection [1] is needed for cables that are in the 'safe zones' [2] AND are 30 mA RCD protected.
If you want to stray outside the safe zones you need mechanical protection, or one of the prescribed protected types of cable. The RCD is than optional from the point of view of cable protection, but may be required for other reasons - circuits feeding general-purpose socket-outlets, high earth fault loop impedance, etc.
The use of top-hat capping (metal or plastic) is good practice and protects the cables during construction and plastering, but it does not constitute mechanical protection in the sense of this thread.
[1] Prescribed 'self-protected' cable types, or earthed conduit or trunking, or measures to prevent penetration by nails or screws (generally interpreted as min. 3 mm thick mild steel).
[2] Horizontally or vertically to a visible electrical fitting or wiring accessory (which can be on the 'other' side of the wall if this is accessible), or within 150 mm of a corner, or within 150 mm of a ceiling.
--
Andy

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Thanks for the replies, what about a stud wall, how should cable be protected in that?
Graham
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On 16/10/2010 18:12, Graham Jones wrote:

Same answer - Bury deeper than 50mm (from both sides!), RCD, or earthed metallic enclosure (i.e. conduit, earthshield (or other similar foil screen cable), SWA or MICC)
--
Cheers,

John.

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OK, it is all making more sense now, but there is one thing I just don't get.
My situation is that I am planning to add a socket in a stud wall, my idea is to add an extra noggin with a cut out in the noggin to fit a metal back box. The cut out will be exactly the right depth so the mounting box is flush with the wall surface.
As the cable needs to be in an earthed metal conduit, I could use something like:
http://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Products/CO20G.html
But how to "connect" this to the mounting box and satisfy the earthing requirement?
Although my main problem is that with this conduit in place there is no longer any room for the plasterboard! The conduit needs to be at least 12.5 mm from the front of the mounting box, and obviously this isn't so. So how to do it?
Incidentally are there any guidelines about how to prevent someone drilling from the other side of the stud wall straight through the mounting box and into the socket itself. If a plastic drywall box had been used then this is easily do-able with a SDS drill. It seems daft to go to all this trouble to protect the cable when the actual fitting is quite defenceless. This is why I have chosen a metal mounting box.
Thanks,
Graham
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Are your sockets RCD protected?
--
Adam



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