Buying non-standard-sized windows & building regs.

I need to buy three non-standard sized (960mm x 1290mm) replacement windows for my house. Can anyone recommend a good-value supplier?
I may opt for upvc or timber, depending on cost.
I am also trying to determine the current building regs for upstairs windows in domestic dwellings, and their opening requirements. Can anyone point me to the current regulations?
Many thanks,
Al
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"AL_n" wrote in message
I need to buy three non-standard sized (960mm x 1290mm) replacement windows for my house. Can anyone recommend a good-value supplier?
I may opt for upvc or timber, depending on cost.
I am also trying to determine the current building regs for upstairs windows in domestic dwellings, and their opening requirements. Can anyone point me to the current regulations?
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If they are bedrooms they need to be "escapable through" (with the assumption that there is something safe on the other side to escape into)
tim
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Thanks, Tim. I found one set of building regs that stipulates an unobstructed openng of at least 450mm by at least 450mm, the opening part being no more than 1100mm above floor level. I wonder if this is the current requirement.
There is nothing outside my first-floor windows, except a 12ft (approx) drop to the pavement below.
I found two online suppliers that can supply casement windows with the bottom half opening:
http://www.easyfitwindow.com
http://www.windowforce.co.uk
(the latter being the cheaper). Can anyone recommend either of these companies' products and service?
Thanks,
Al
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AL_n wrote:

I believe it is.
And that vital 0.33m^2 area. so 450x450 is NOT big enough.

Thats not an issue when you have a fire engine rig and ladder out there to climb down..

Frankly I have found that local suppliers an usually beat 'online prices' and make up anything you want.
UPVC is simply section cutting from standard stock and insertion of stock hardware and custom made glazing panels.
wood isn't a lot different.

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Thank you for the great input. I'm now inclined to opt for having the full window area openable (top hung), to allow an uninterrupted view.
As this type costs about the same as a window that is only half-opening, I'm surprised more people don't opt for this type. Are there any disadvantages to having the full (1m x 1m approx) openable?
Thanks to the other respondees also.
Al
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AL_n wrote:

well the stays can get a bit large. But a lot of modern windows ate hinged part way down I suppose so that you can restruct the opening a bit..
I always prefer side hung that can b opened a little for ventilation or in an emergency, sofd the stay and open wide!
As with all these things, find a good local company and listen to what they say.
Only one thing is clear, the worst people to buy windows from are double glazing companies.
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In Scotland at least, you're required to be able to clean the outside of all windows from the inside of the house (whether you employ a window cleaner or not).
Top hung windows which have a hinge at the top of the frame will not allow that, though you might get away with the ones where the opening portion moves out & down (because someone could reach out over the top of the moving part). I have a feeling that that's disallowed too if someone would have to stand on a chair or something to do it.
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in

That's interesting. I'm glad we don't have that particular rule in England. However, now you mention it, being able to clean the outside of all the glass from the inside does sound like an advantage. Of course, the degree to which it can be done, with various window types, depends on the tools one is using. (long-handled ones are going to reach further, etc.)
Al
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On 04/08/2012 10:16, tim..... wrote:

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That is certainly the case for new windows - i.e. for new build or extensions - but are you sure that it also applies to *replacement* windows, where you are simply replacing one window with another? I have several small upstairs windows which couldn't possibly comply with that without making the aperture in the brickwork much larger!
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Roger
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"Roger Mills" wrote in message

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That is certainly the case for new windows - i.e. for new build or extensions - but are you sure that it also applies to *replacement* windows, where you are simply replacing one window with another? I have several small upstairs windows which couldn't possibly comply with that without making the aperture in the brickwork much larger!
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That's not the same thing as making the open-able part bigger.
And yes I am sure that it applies to replacement windows, in the same aperture (if it is big enough)
tim
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On 04/08/2012 18:48, tim..... wrote:

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And what if it's not big enough?
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Roger
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"Roger Mills" wrote in message

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And what if it's not big enough?
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As you need PP to make it bigger, and PP might not be granted (esp in a conservation area), I guess that the current size of the hole trumps all other requirements.
tim
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[Default] On Sat, 04 Aug 2012 17:49:36 +0100, a certain chimpanzee,
wrote:

Correct. The Building Regulations would only apply to new openings, not to the replacement of existing windows (except to determine whether they comply with the requirements for energy efficiency). There is guidance in a British Standard that at least one replacement window on the first floor should be suitable for means of escape, but I don't know if it is enforcable by Trading Standards.
For the OP, the guidance for the means of escape is that the window should have a clear unobstructed area of at least 0.33m^2 measured at right angles to the glass, with a minimum opening width or height of 0.45m, and that the bottom of the opening (not necessarily the window sill) should be between 900mm - 1100mm above the floor. Consideration should also be given to where the window is placed in relation to any fragile or glazed roofs below.
Having said all of that, a decent smoke detection system is a much better bet.
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On 05/08/2012 13:36, Hugo Nebula wrote:

In our case, all of the windows were in before we moved in and any escape via an upstairs window would require smashing it. I'm not bothered about that though, as the best escape route is onto a flat roof, standing our conservatory off by about 900mmm from the back of the house (and then the much shorted drop or even climb down via the fence next to it) and I'd rather not have it as an easy entry point for burglars!

Agreed.
SteveW
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Unlike either a concrete patio or a very prickly strong bush like in my house you mean.
grin
Brian
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AL_n wrote:

damn. I don't think they have changed but each room needs a window you can get a fireman in and out of so to speak.
2000 regs have a minimum openable area of .33 sq meter and no less than 450mm in any dimension (height or width)
Any joiner who makes up windows will know the current regs. You may also need to put in trickle ventilation - again the joiners or window manufacturers will know 'the norm'

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I gather they also stipulate that this has to be measured at 90 degrees from the fixed part of the window and unobstructed. The problem is, that most PVC windows have travel-limiting hinges. Perhaps the special "fire escape hinges" overcome this. From a practucal POV, I suppose a side-hung opening section is going to be easier to escape through (when in a panic situation) than a top-hung one. However, I live in an area prone to strong winds, so I like the idea of top-hung windows, as they are (I guess) much less likely to get caught and damaged by a ghust of strong wind.
I was thinking of oting for having the full are aof the window openable (top hung). However, it occurs to me that this as a heavy openable section that would put a lot of strain on the hinges, so pehaps having only half the window openable would be wiser. Any comments, anyone?
I've noticed that on PVC windows, the hinges often fail long before the rest of the window gives problems. Can anyone offer any advice on how to recognise (before buying) hings systems that are likely to give premature problems?

Do they mean a thin fireman or a fat fireman? (I'm thinking Stan Laurel vs. Oliver Hardy...)
Al
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I presume that someone must have a spec somewhere for a British Standard Fireman (Or would that be ISO Fireman these days?)
Nick
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[Default] On 6 Aug 2012 08:46:31 GMT, a certain chimpanzee, "AL_n"

As I always say to someone who says, "if there was a fire I'd get through that" when referring to a 300mm wide opening; "yes, but could someone wearing breathing apparatus get in?"
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Hugo Nebula wrote:

The ex had a thing for firemen.
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