BT phone/internet installation to replace cable?



Um, how does that work? Surely positioning your router in a central location with fewest obstructions gives you best wireless coverage.
Having your master socket near that location too is good but doesn't influence wireless coverage.
Tim
--
Please don't feed the trolls

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The primary limit on your speed is the quality of your DSL line. Depending on how grotty your exterior line and internal wiring are, having a stub from the master socket can cause impedance mismatch and/or loss of signal = loss of DSL speed. Once you have signal into the digital domain at the router, you're safe(ish).
That means normally the logic is: put the router near the master socket, to minimise DSL line issues. Wireless comes secondary, because usually fast wireless (100Mbps) v slow wireless (20Mbps) is less of an effect than dropping from say 17Mbps to 10Mbps on the DSL speed.
But for the OP, they're getting a new master socket installed so they can put it anywhere that's convenient. Freed from the constraint of the master socket, the best place for the router itself is wherever it's best for wireless. Getting Openreach to locate the master socket next to it minimises DSL carriage over the OP's wiring, and DSL problems upstream of the master socket are Openreach's problem not the OP's.
Theo
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Which is not the same as wireless coverage.
Tim
--
Please don't feed the trolls

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Wi-Fi speed is also effected if you use a slow connection between master socket and router.
--
*Even a blind pig stumbles across an acorn now and again *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 28 Apr 2017 10:13:58 +0100, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

There is no relationship between the speed of the WiFi network and the speed of your internet connection. Devices on WiFi or WiFi and LAN or LAN only will talk to each other at the LAN speed or the limit imposed by the WiFi.
Devices talking to the internet will be limited to the speed of the internet but data passing over the LAN or WiFi will be at those speeds.
--
Cheers
Dave.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sheesh. Wifi speed is not the same as wifi coverage.
Tim
--
Please don't feed the trolls

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You can have Wi-Fi coverage with no internet connection at all too.
--
*Caution: I drive like you do.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2017-04-27, Tim+ wrote:

I have a couple of TP-link powerline plug-in gadgets in the house to improve wi-fi coverage. (The master one is connected to the router with an RJ-45 cable; the others are just plugged into power sockets.)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 27 Apr 2017 21:11:56 +0100 (BST), Theo wrote:

Doesn't seem to be a problem here. There is about 30 m of cable (Cat5e) from the master socket to the filter for the POTS side. The filter is at the router.
Remember that if you aren't using POTS you don't need a filter at all.
--
Cheers
Dave.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 27/04/2017 21:11, Theo wrote:

Whilst true in theory I find that up to 10m of high quality cable makes no perceptible difference to noise margin or maximum sync rate. That is unless you run it parallel to mains wiring or something equally stupid.
My master socket is conveniently located in the loft (thanks BT). I have a moderate length of cable running to the router downstairs but I have tried it the other way around running mains into the loft and a short signal cable - it made not one jot of difference.

Siting the router to get best coverage of the property is ideal.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 3 May 2017 10:25:49 +0100, Martin Brown wrote:

+1
Less than 10 m of crap cable here significantly affect the ADSL+ sync speed. The crap cable was a bit of telephone cable but CCS (Copper Clad Steel), Replaced with solid copper CAT5e sync speed recovered.

Router, coverage? How does a router have coverage? I guess you mean a single combined modem/router/switch/access point box. I'd have seperate AP(*) so you can put it in the best RF location without awkward cabling.
(*) A "cable" router/switch/AP may well be cheaper than a pure AP, just ignore the WAN side.
--
Cheers
Dave.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2017-04-27, Theo wrote:

Let me make sure I have this right: for an OpenReach installation, the one master socket is the same piece of equipment for the phone and internet connections (as opposed to the cable set-up I have now)?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
[26 lines snipped]

Yes.
--
Today is Pungenday, the 50th day of Discord in the YOLD 3183
Celebrate Discoflux
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It is here. Basically a splitter/filter with ordinary phone on one side - extended to where you want in the house, and the ADSL side. So usually the closest socket to the incoming line.
My view is you'll get the best results by siting the router there using the supplied cable, and cable to any PCs etc using CAT 6. An ordinary phone type extension cable (with adaptors) to move the router to the best place for Wi-Fi coverage may pick up interference etc within the house.
My phone line comes in to the cellar. So that's where my master socket and router are. Very convenient for the CAT 5 wiring to other areas. The router is sited as high as possible in the cellar, so just above ground level. Wi-Fi coverage is fine in the house and nearby.
--
*A backward poet writes inverse.*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2017-05-03, Johnny B Good wrote:

Well, it's obvious if you're already familiar with it!

Yes. When we moved in, the house had cable telephone & TV (it was actually called Yorkshire Cable then); broadband was added later.
Thanks for the rest of the details (snipped here).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2017-04-27, Adrian Caspersz wrote:

Interesting link, thanks. I'm not considering BT itself but Utility Warehouse, which AIUI uses BT's physical connections.

So I've heard!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 27/04/2017 16:51, Adam Funk wrote:

BT will install a master socket. You should be able to get them to put it where you want. Ideally, the master socket should have a filtered faceplate to which you can connect your router (or modem + router). The wiring upstream of the master socket is BT's property and you are not supposed to interfere with it. Any extension wiring downstream of the socket should be connected to the faceplate and is your responsibility.
See http://forums.thinkbroadband.com/fibre/t/4535027-new-install-refused-master-socket-location-choice.html
Or search that forum for other similar threads about 'new master socket'
--
Michael Chare

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 27/04/2017 16:51, Adam Funk wrote:

The line does not have to be BT and neither does the internet... The physical installation is done by Open Reach (or a sub contractor), but that is not the same as having BT as your ISP.

Depending on which ISP you go with, they will often supply a ADSL router that has the modem and router in one box, usually with wireless and a few wired ports as well.

You may be able to get them to stick the master socket where you want. Much depends on how helpful the installer you get on the day is. Some just want the easiest and quickest install for them.

Not sure I would want to go back to ADSL/FTTC if you have the choice of cable broadband... Pick a decent ISP (not BT!)
--
Cheers,

John.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

ISTR there is a specified max distance from the current entry point, something like 15 metres but it is a while since I looked it up (on Bt's website)

--
bert

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2017-04-28, John Rumm wrote:

Thanks for the information. (Apparently I'm using the wrong terminology about "BT".)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.