black and white slides versus prints

Slides have a greater dynamic range if projected in a darkened room.
Bill
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The only black and white slide film I've tried (I was given a roll, process-paid, by a camera shop where I had films developed - they probably couldn't sell it!) was horrendously slow - about 25 ASA - and gave very moody, contrasty results, with a lot of highlight and shadow detail missing. It certainly didn't have the tonal range of Kodachrome or Ektachrome but in black and white.
But I think that was unusual. In general, slides give better dynamic range than prints. However, it is the printing stage where you lose extreme tonal detail with prints: I was gobsmacked the first time I scanned a negative and compared it with the print that the shop had made: there was a lot of highlight and shadow detail in the negative that had been crushed to black or white on the print.
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On Tuesday, 16 October 2018 16:09:34 UTC+1, NY wrote:

y

I used agfa dira-direct at 32 ASA difficult to get and expensive which is w hy we used stock pan F which was cheap and DIY develop it for RAW chemicals from the chemisry lab.

I remmeber we had do downrate the film and expose for longer than the 50 AS A pan F was rated at IIRC 10 ASA was nearer the mark so we went to FP4 125 asa and rated it at about 50 asa.

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We weren't really interested in that, it was the process.

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But that also depends on your technique, don;t forget printing papers came in many types and weights and contrast even I had grades 0-5 and I think yo u could get an extended range. There was also matt, pearl, stipple, glossy and many semi finishes which also affect the look of the final print. Then you could use a glazzing machine for a super gloss finish, which had the effect of increasing contrast and sharpness.
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On 16/10/2018 15:39, Bill Wright wrote:

Yeah, right. They may have a greater dynamic range on the slide, but remember the projected 'black' is actually a white screen illuminated by the light in the room.
A black and white slide would have higher dynamic range if shown on an OLED TV in a darkened room, as the blacks will be deeper as the screen itself is dark and there is no breakthrough from the screen backlight.
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Yes but they need to be actually copied correctly to stop them being like a tv with the contrast full up, Soot and whitwash as we used to say. Brian
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On Tuesday, 16 October 2018 15:39:13 UTC+1, Bill Wright wrote:

To get that dynamic range you need a pitch black room. Most audiences aren't ok with that, so one usually gets poor contrast.
NT
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