Attach shed roof to neighbours wall

Hi, I want to put a small potting shed at the end of garden. Boundary wall was demolished when the end neighbour built their garage 9 inch inside the line of the boundary. They have no access to this narrow sliver, so I suppose its sort of like my use at the moment
She said she was happy with me attaching supports to this wall for holding up small roof. Is this likely to lead to problems down the road, when a prospective buyer of either mine or hers throws a wobbly at this. It looks like a de facto boundary wall, but I suppose it is not as she build it inside her own yard. They are really helpful and understanding, but I dont want to get all legal, not now not ever with them over a small strip of garden.
Ok so its best I dont build up against her wall, but what am I to do.. Its the only place in the garden where I want to put the shed. I cant really build a boundary wall alongside or it just becomes a narrow space for crap for which I will be responsible for.
What would you suggest
Joe
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says...

Build the shed flush with the wall but don't attach it, and leave room to drag it forward 9 inches if it ever becomes an issue.
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Rob Morley wrote:

I'd go along with that too; or you could even build the thing on your boundary and leave the 9" gap (or even 12" to make it big enough for someone small to squeeze down there if need be?). It's quite common to have a gap that size between bits of adjacent property. Why will you be 'responsible' for the gap any more than your neighbour, given that the land concerned is actually hers anyway?
I certainly wouldn't build your shed 'permanently' over the gap as it's highly likely that if and when your neighbour sells up, the buyer's solicitor will kick off and insist the shed's moved before exchanging contracts.
David
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says...

You will need some form of 'base' to put your shed on. Start at the garage wall and there should be no issues with weeds etc between your shed and her garage. Allow enough room on your base for the shed to be completely on your side of the boundary when built, then push it up against the garage. *IF* your neighbour needs the space back, slide the shed back over to your side.
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I think you are worrying too much about something which is unlikely to happen.
If the current neighbour is happy, then I would build onto the existing wall.
After years of use, you will aquire the land by right
dg
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If the neighbour sells, you may be forced to remove it. If you want to move you might have to remove it before the sale. What happens if the wall is damaged in any way? better not to have the opportunity to be blamed for it.
Years ago my father built a garage. The neighbour encouraged him to build up against his garage, but wisely my father didn't. The neighbours garage developed a huge crack and who would have been to blame.. ?

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Hi, That certainly got me thinking, the sliver is so small its not worth worrying about it.. But I think I leave the gap, however make it reasonably wide, cover it over with the roof a bit and store some fence posts in there.
Whats a good light allowing roofing material to use?
The roof is reasonably high, so I think the perspex used for conservatory roofs might be suitable.
Joe
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Or you could use a bit of ply and shed felt. Conservatory polycarbonate isn't the cheapest material. It is also noisy in the rain and doesn't provide so much UV protection to anything stored beneath.
Christian.
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Do not attach anything to the wall. I have know it where water has worked its way inside a neighbours garage because of this. Avoid problems, legal and neighbour by having your shed on your land only. This gives a nice 9" gap to get any fallen items out.
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If your neighbour has agreed then there is not much problem now or later. A verbal agreement is just as binding as a written agreement - but more difficult to prove if it ever came to it. A future buyer is also bound by it. The only problem is that you are taking on some responsibility for the neighbours wall - it becomes a boundary wall, so you must make sure it is done properly and maintained. If your neighbour has abandoned the 9" to your use then it becomes yours after 12(?) years as of right. But unless the boundary is very obvious or precisely specified in the deeds etc then this is probably not an issue either. You could google "boundary wall problems"
cheers
Jacob
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snipped-for-privacy@googlemail.com wrote:

not necessarily when relating to land.
Owain
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