any tips on cutting acrylic sheet?

I have bought some acrylic sheet for replacing the glass in my greenhouse. On the sheet it suggests cutting it using a jigsaw, a cutting tool or scoring it and breaking it along the score (a bit like cutting ceramic tiles I suppose). Any tips or thoughts? Thanks Mike
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tiles
Acrlyic is nasty stuff A jig saw will either melt it or break it unless you waste some practicing. I've found deep scoring effective.
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Agree, but crack can wander from the score, like glass. You can cut it by hand with a hacksaw or almost any sort of wood saw, just keep the speed and pressure low to avoid melting. You may get away with a jigsaw with care if it has a very slow speed
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On 29 Feb 2004 22:04:30 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (OldScrawn) wrote:

I'd also try and support it very close to where you are cutting. If the saw snags it's likeky to crack.
As mentioned, slow and steady is the game here ;-)
T i m
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Better to bit the bullet & use Polycarbonate
The neighbours wine bottles bounce better Luckily they are dead now
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"Chris Oates" <none> wrote in message

Why, were they full ones before?
--
J.Milton.Hayes


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I've found that scoring deeply helps. I've got some 30mm*5mm steel bar that is really handy.
Clamp onto sheet with some clamps, and then score several times (at least ten) altering the angle slightly to dig a fairly deep groove, before removing, placing on an edge, and using the bar to touch the whole edge before pressing down on it slowly works well.
You can friction cut it, by taking a smooth 2mm or so rod, clamping in a dremel, and simply running it along an edge. Not neatly, but it's a handy alternative occasionally.
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The company i bought it from suggests using a "glodex cutting tool" - looks like a Stanley knife from the illustration - any views?
Could you spell out, what you mean by a 30mm*5m steel bar? Where can one buy these?
What's a dremel?
Sorry to be so ignorant!
Mike
I've found that scoring deeply helps.

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A stanley knife works. You may find that a "hook-shaped" blade works best, look in your local DIY store blade section.

Ironmonger? It's simply a 30mm*5mm*2m (or so) steel bar. Really handy for clamping to stuff and cutting using either stanley knives or powertools.

It's often misused as a generic term, it's the main product of the Dremel company, (http://www.dremel.com/) and is a small very high speed handheld drill, held like a fat pencil in the hand. (34000RPM is the top speed of most) Very handy for many tasks. There are others that make quality imitators, and lots of terrible low-powered copies.

Ignorance is curable. Stupidity is not asking questions, or pretending you know already.
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looks
Initially, I was thinking of a hot wire cutter - but if you have an illustration, give us a link - Google gives naff all on glodex - except a Miami Shipping Company - and I don't think *THAT'S* what you're looking for!
As an aside, I'm just embarking on the "Ooh - I think I'll build meself a greenhouse - lark". Why do you want to use acrylic instead of glass? Apart from the obvious breakage level, of course!
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"Chris Oates" <none> wrote:

I've just cut some today. I used a bandsaw - no problems. :-)
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Marcus
To reply use marcus at frenchay dot demon dot co dot uk
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wrote:

On a slightly related subject - what's the recommended cutting method for transparent corrogated roof panels? These are some sort of plastic and scoring isn't really an option when cutting across the width.
PoP
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Last time I did them I took an angle grinder to them with a cutting disc in place. Slow and careful is the key.
--

Dave

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Go for twinwall instead, it lasts longer
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geoff

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If you are talking about the type used in "asbestos roofed" garages and the like, I used a standard sized (not Junior) hacksaw blade, out of the hacksaw, with the "hand" end wrapped in a rag! Gently does it - as others here have noted!
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snip
Lat time I looked there were two versions of clear corrugated roof panels. One was cheap and nasty. It cracks, splinters etc if you as much as take the saw out of the toolbox, the other is a heavier duty version used in warehouses etc.
The first version is most likely the one you will see for sale retail. My advice is don't try to cut it at all. Attempt to get sheets the required length to allow you overlap the ends without too much waste.
Paul Mc Cann
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On Wed, 03 Mar 2004 07:08:47 +0000, snipped-for-privacy@eircom.net wrote:

I can confirm it does crack/splinter - hence my question.

Length is no problem, but there's a gutter downpipe which requires a cutout in the roof panel, and having already tried to cut a sheet (and ended up with a mess) I'm head-scratching as to how to cut this!
Maybe my instant soldering iron gun might do the job.....
PoP
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PoP wrote in message ...

A low speed drill and a hole saw with lots of water will normally cut holes in these materials.
Regards Capitol
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Might be worth making a hot wire cutter from a car battery charger and some resistive wire off an old radiant fire element.
cheers, Pete.
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Clamp a straight edge across the sheet. Deeply score with the pointed edge of an old chisel at least ten times. Repeat at the edges, starting on the sheet and going off the edge. Clamp the sheet to a bench/table with a 2"x1" along the score on top so that the score is on the edge of the bench. Use a piece of 2"x1" (at least) to push the overhang down not more than 6" from the score, until it snaps No problem, works every time.
--
Lawrence
Nottingham, UK
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