Another boiler in bathroom question!

I bought a house at auction and the boiler is in the bathroom. It's
fully working so I'd prefer not to move it, but it is only 1.63m from
the bath at the nearest point, and there is a shower over the bath too.
I assume this would not pass a corgi inspection.
Is it allowed to box the boiler in so that it is watertight and leave
it in this position or will it have to be moved? Or perhaps there are
other alternatives?
TIA
Reply to
d_thornaby
In article , d snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk writes:
Why? That's over a metre further away from the bath than it has to be -- it's well into Zone 3. Minimum distance is 0.6m measured horizontally. Any closer (and providing it isn't over the bath) and it would be in Zone 2, which would still be OK if the casing is IPX4 rated.
Unless you expect to be spraying water jets at it, I don't see a problem. If you want to box it in, you will have to check the boiler's installation manual for minimum spacing and ventilation requirements.
Reply to
Andrew Gabriel
Thanks for the prompt reply Andrew. One more question. It has a fused switched supply in the bathroom next to the boiler, is this ok?
Reply to
d_thornaby
In article , d snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk writes:
As long as it's also at least 0.6m measured horizontally from the bath/shower, including the supply wiring to it if it is surface mounted. The boiler needs to be included in the bathroom equipotential bonding.
Reply to
Andrew Gabriel
I have an interest in a property that had a boiler (water heater) in the bathroom. The surveyor told me that apart from being a poss safety hazard, any gas appliance in a bathroom was a very negative selling point. This was due to deaths of e.g. students because of carbon monoxide poisoning. When we took over the property the 1st thing we did was rip out this bathroom gas water heater and the boiler in the kitchen and replace both with a combi in the kitchen.
Reply to
OldBill
"open flue" gas appliances like "geysers" are now illegal in bathrooms (and rather undesirable in most other locations).
Owain
Reply to
Owain
In article ,
Due to faulty non room sealed water heaters. But those would be rare these days. RS multi-points have been around for ages, and they can't introduce CO to the room.
I fitted my RS central heating boiler in the bathroom because at that time it had to be a floor standing type. And the only place it could go in the kitchen would have been very inconvenient due to the layout. Across the end outside wall part is covered with the outside loo and near the rest is window. On the other outside wall, part is covered by a conservatory, and much of the rest by patio doors. So a very small 'window' of positioning to comply with the regs for the terminal.
Neighbours with similar design houses had them fitted in the outside loo, which of course is then not one anymore. And very inconvenient for the pipework because of a solid floor.
Since I'd enlarged the original tiny bathroom by incorporating the bedroom behind it and the corridor to that, I wasn't short of space there. So fitted the boiler and storage cylinder in there - and of course it's nice and warm always.
It seems strange to me to regard the kitchen as the norm for a boiler as most will already have excess heat at times. Whereas a bathroom can rarely be too hot. Of course, modern boilers will have less heat 'loss' and one of my required size can be now wall mounted. And flue arrangements are more flexible.
However, when I come to replace the boiler, it's staying where it is. ;-)
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
In article , OldBill writes:
That was open flued appliances, most commonly, the old Ascot type instant water heaters. People would run them to fill and top up the bath, having blocked up all the drafty ventilation holes into the bathroom which supplied the required oxygen for it. They were killing around 40 people a year, and continued to exist in rented student digs long after they should have been condemmed.
A modern room sealed gas appliance in a bathroom is not an issue.
Reply to
Andrew Gabriel

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