3" fence posts or 4" fence posts?

Hi, oh learned ones!
I need to construct a fence that will be subject to some strong winds. It i s only 5.7 meters long and will have 5 posts, two of which will be bolted t o buildings. The three intermediate posts will be held by galvanized fence post holders (concreted in). My big question is: Is there any point in stre tching to 4" posts and hardware, or will the 3" versions be perfectly adequ ate? I find it hard to imagine a 3" fence post snapping in even the stronge st winds - but I could be wrong.
Any insights or advice on this matter?
Many thanks
Al-W
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"Al-W" wrote in message

Depends how high it is !
3" tall no issue
3 Metre tall might be a problem!
Sheltered location - probably no issue
Cliff top in outer Hebrides - problems ensue !
All parameters needed :)
Andrew
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On Monday, June 5, 2017 at 6:35:59 PM UTC+1, Al-W wrote:

is only 5.7 meters long and will have 5 posts, two of which will be bolted to buildings. The three intermediate posts will be held by galvanized fenc e post holders (concreted in). My big question is: Is there any point in st retching to 4" posts and hardware, or will the 3" versions be perfectly ade quate? I find it hard to imagine a 3" fence post snapping in even the stron gest winds - but I could be wrong.

PS.. I forgot to mention that the fence will be 2 meters tall and all timbe r.
Al-W
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'All timber'? Is it panelled, if so I'm not sure if 3" posts will be enopugh, even 4" might be marginal.
--
Chris Green
·

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On Monday, June 5, 2017 at 7:33:05 PM UTC+1, Chris Green wrote:

.

nized

nt

ectly

e

imber.

Chris, thanks for the input. I plan to use 6" x 1" vertical boards, nailed alternately, each side of the fence, in order to allow some wind through, a nd thus reduce wind resistance.·
Al
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On 06/06/2017 12:15, Al-W wrote:

I'd be interested if anyone knows of evidence of how much (or little) that reduces wind resistance. I've seen "up to 15%" quoted but (a) "up to" makes me wonder if that is in ideal wind speed and direction and (b) it surprised me given the wind load even for chain link fencing can be 25 to 50% of the wind load of a solid fence.
--
Robin
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On Tuesday, June 6, 2017 at 1:45:12 PM UTC+1, Robin wrote:

led alternately, each side of the fence, in order to allow some wind throug h, and thus reduce wind resistance.·

Hmmm... That's a little worrying.
Al
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3" definitely not enough! 4" minimum unless you enjoy replacing broken posts. ;-)
Tim
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Its not the posts that I find are the first casualties its the panels themselves. Also whether metal concreted or wood directly concreted, after a time the post shrinks and swells and water gets down into the bottom of the post hole in the concrete, it cannot get away, rusts the sockets and rots the wood and the break occurs at ground level usually. make damned sure the wood is well protected al the way down and if possible impregnated as cheapo posts tent to break. Can you run to concrete posts? Brian
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Depends on how the fence is done.

He's talking about posts in metal and is asking about the size of the posts.

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Concrete posts, set in concrete (postfix/postcrete) and then clad in rough sawn wood if someone objects to the bare concrete look.
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On Monday, June 5, 2017 at 8:23:31 PM UTC+1, The Other Mike wrote:

It is only 5.7 meters long and will have 5 posts, two of which will be bol ted to buildings. The three intermediate posts will be held by galvanized f ence post holders (concreted in). My big question is: Is there any point in stretching to 4" posts and hardware, or will the 3" versions be perfectly adequate? I find it hard to imagine a 3" fence post snapping in even the st rongest winds - but I could be wrong.

mber.

h sawn

That sounds like a great idea. Unfortunately, I need the posts to be remova ble easily.
Al
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On 06/06/2017 12:20, Al-W wrote:

ITYM "removable easily except by the wind" :)
Do you need to be able to remove the posts down to ground level or would you be able to get away with concrete spurs to which you bolt the posts? (They can be sunk lower than usual at the risk of earlier rot of the posts.)
http://www.supremeconcrete.co.uk/general/repair-spur/
IMLE "concrete in" metal posts holders are a bit weedy for 2m panels but there may be stronger ones out there.
http://www.screwfix.com/p/concrete-in-post-supports-100-x-100mm-2-pack/70197
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On Tuesday, June 6, 2017 at 12:50:57 PM UTC+1, Robin wrote:

s. It is only 5.7 meters long and will have 5 posts, two of which will be b olted to buildings. The three intermediate posts will be held by galvanized fence post holders (concreted in). My big question is: Is there any point in stretching to 4" posts and hardware, or will the 3" versions be perfectl y adequate? I find it hard to imagine a 3" fence post snapping in even the strongest winds - but I could be wrong.

timber.

ough sawn

movable easily.

197

Thanks very much for that suggestion. Unfortunately, I need the posts to be removeable to possibly allow a vehicle through, which has to drive though at a 45 degree angle, so unless those spurs were about 10ft apart, those c oncrete spurs are not really an option, unfortunately. Yes, I am a little c oncerned that the metal post holders will be the weak point in the fence, b ut I don't know of any other option that'll allow a vehicle to drive throug h when the posts are removed. Unless anyone herehas another suggestion.
Al
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My neighbour has a metal fence with metal verticals, that opens like a big metal covered gate when he wants to get a car into the yard.
Works fine.
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On 07/06/2017 18:25, Al-W wrote:

Maybe a really dumb suggestion but have you thought of a standard farmyard style 5 bar farm gate? One very robust post to hang it from and a smaller one at the securing end. You could still clad it with vertical boards if you want to make it less see through.
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Chris B (News)

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I have this arrangement, but the gate cannot support the weight and is slowly sagging, even though I have a wheel at the non-hinge end.
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On Mon, 5 Jun 2017 10:52:01 -0700 (PDT), Al-W

I have a 6ft high close boarded fence with 6" square posts bolted to concrete studs down one side of the garden. A couple of months back the strong winds actually snapped one fence post AND it's concrete stud at ground level. It was a pig of a job to dig it all out!
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On Tuesday, June 6, 2017 at 10:04:49 AM UTC+1, Davidm wrote:

It is only 5.7 meters long and will have 5 posts, two of which will be bol ted to buildings. The three intermediate posts will be held by galvanized f ence post holders (concreted in). My big question is: Is there any point in stretching to 4" posts and hardware, or will the 3" versions be perfectly adequate? I find it hard to imagine a 3" fence post snapping in even the st rongest winds - but I could be wrong.

mber.

Wow - that's relevant information; thanks! I think I will have to choose my 4" wooden posts carefully then. Also, I plan on making for less wind-resis tance by staggering the vertical boards alternately on each side of the hor izontal pieces - allowing some wind to pass through.
Al
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On 05/06/17 18:35, Al-W wrote:

Use 4" concrete posts set in cement, with concrete gravel boards
Then the things won't rot

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