2 Gang Light Switch WIring

Hi,
In my kitchen I am going to install a 2 gang, 1 way switch, to control main light and under wall units lights seperatly.
As I am in a flat, we don't have ceiling access and lights are wired with in switch wiring, so I am going to continue down this route for the new lights.
Question is do I just run one 1.0mm cable(red, black, earth) into the switch to provide the power, then I can have my 2 cables coming out to switch, one to each set of lights?
Each switch has a L1, L2, L3 on the back of the switch, so it does not appear this is possible, at first glance?
Any thoughts?
THanks
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Yes, but colours are now brown and blue

Run the live to L1 on one gang, and link to L1 on second gang. Terminate Neutral in single termnal block. Terminate earth to earthing point Wire lights off L2, Terminal blockand earth respectivly

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Had cable with old colours and these can be used till April 2006, thanks for the pointer :)

Thank you :-)

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SEE http://www.diydoctor.org.uk/projects/lights_and_switches.htm
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Thanks for the link, had a look at that before, and that is a brill diagram ... if you have standard loop in lighting, which I don't. No DIY book I have come across covers my lighting circuit so hence why I posted here.
Basically each switch has 2 cables, one live from supply, the other to the switch. This method is not covered in books I have looked at, and is frequently used in flat rewires as there is no ceiling access.
If any one knows of a book covering this, please point me to it :)
Dave Jones, answered the question nicely :-) Thanks Dave
Thanks
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Common enough way to wire a single light - as say in a cupboard. You can use this feed for a second light from the same switch box quite happily. The problem might be that of space inside the backing box.
When doing a basic rewire, I'll often run a triple and earth as the switch 'pair' and connect the blue - suitably sleeved - to the neutral of the rose. This allows the later installation of lighting sockets at floor level for things like table lamps.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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wrote:

The perfect way to wire in the wall lights or outside lights when doing a rewire.
I am glad someone else also uses this method. My NIC inspector did not like it as he had to test two end of lines for ELI.
Adam
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On 5 Mar 2005 16:16:17 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk (inNeedofHelp) strung together this:

Eh?
Don't know, I don't know how your switch is wired. Either more detsil or get someone else in.

Get someone in, you've confused yourself and you haven't started the job yet.
--

SJW
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You mean there's a neutral present inside the switch? This wouldn't be connected to the switch, but simply looped through to the fitting.

If there is already a neutral present, you don't need to provide a new feed.

Those are two way switches which may be wired as one way. Most bought in a DIY place include instructions on which terminals to use. Older ones were marked C (common) and L1 and L2. You used C and either L1 or L2. There doesn't seem to be a standard for those marked L1,2 and 3. But a guide is thus:-
C / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ L1 L2
The common terminal is usually at the top of a triangle where L1&2 are closer together than L1 to C etc. So use the 'top' one for one of the connections, and either L1 or L2. If the switch works the wrong way round - ie up for off - swop L1 for L2.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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