1" concrete driveway - this'll be fun :)

House across the road. With no warning, previous occupants who have lived there as long as we've lived here (16 years then) upped and moved overnight last November. We got a notice of application to build a 2 storey extension on the side a few days later
Since then, there have been on average not less than 4 guys "working" on the house doing goodness knows what. They've had 12 skips, countless deliveries of bricks and blocks (fuck knows where they've gone) and all to show for it is a rebuilt porch (single storey) and new glazing.
Finally last week it looked like people were viewing/moving in.
Yesterday they cleared a lot of rubble from the front garden, and today are whacking the ground down - presumably to pour a lot of premix concrete onto to make a driveway.
hardcore - you must be joking. depth - 1-2".
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I remember seeing someone lay tarmac over soil where, I’m pretty sure, there had been a lawn of sorts. Not long later you could have mown the tarmac.
The next step was this ‘imprinted’ concrete which looks like paving. Within a year or so, it needed mowing as well.
At the time (about 25 years back) we were considering replacing our drive in a previous house. Until I saw the imprinted concrete here, it had been one of the options. We went for block paving.
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On 11/09/2019 12:21, Brian Reay wrote:

"Boys from the BlackStuff" circa 1981
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On Wednesday, 11 September 2019 12:34:18 UTC+1, Andrew wrote:

y sure,

that scam was very common once. 'We got some tarmac left over from a road j ob, can do your drive for £25 today. Cash, no vat.' Looked great at fi rst. By next year it was trashed.
NT
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On 11/09/2019 13:04, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

This happened to friend of mine: a Doctor of Philosophy; a professor at Cambridge University. He got stung twice: once by the Boys from the Blackstuff and once by his wife, also an academic from Cambridge but with her feet firmly on the ground. When she came home that evening she was absolutely livid!
Nick
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wrote:

My dad was caught out with it. We had a concrete drive with rounded pebbles embedded in the concrete. It was a bloody awful surface, both for riding my pedal car and bicycle over, and for my parents driving their cars over. And the inevitable "leftover tarmac" guys came round and offered to resurface it. My dad, who normally has his head screwed on, fell for it. The drive looked good for a few days and then the tarmac started to come up in patches, exposing the underlying pebbles and concrete. He never did catch up with the culprits, though Trading Standards said they'd had several other reports from people in the area who'd also made complaints about the same guys. This was in the late 60s.
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This is the thing about scams - it is easy to read descriptions and think "Hah! I'd never fall for *that*"; but you never know when some scammer whose M.O. matches your weaknesses will happen by, just when you are a bit distracted ...
#Paul
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On 12/09/2019 11:13, snipped-for-privacy@moo.uklinux.net wrote:

Talking about climate activists again?
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Not long after we had or drive (in fact the whole frontage) of our previous house block paved, we had a knock on the door and just such an offer. He even tried to convince me tarmac was better.
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You do have to also watch those who are not out and out scammers but fancy themselves as odd job men and graduate upward with no knowledge at all. Luckily I only got them to paint Creosote on my front fence. They painted over the embossed reflective numbers, even though they could easily have removed the screws and replaced them. There was creosote on the hedge on the pavement spots of it on the gate, which was freshly painted white. I noted at the time they offered driveways, I feel anyone taking them up on that might have some slight issues of quality of work. Brian
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wrote:

Mate of mine had the imprinted concrete and it never had anything coming through it. Her husband was a builder.
Most of ours are concrete, mostly not imprinted and I have never seen any with grass growing through them.
We don’t have many tarmac driveways.
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On Thu, 12 Sep 2019 01:41:31 +1000, jeikppkywk wrote:

Another house across the road (2 doors along) had theirs done 2 years ago after a new owner. A load of proper motorway maintenance vehicles turned up and dug, put hardcore and at least a foot of tarmac down before rolling it with a steam roller. It must have cost tens of thousands and in no way matched the status of the house. SWMBO and I agree there's something "odd" about it. No one seems to live there, but ice-cream vans are stored in the garage the new owner built, and there's a stream of people turning up daily - as if to work.
I reckon it's a drug dealers den (with ice cream vans being a front ...). But heigh ho, doesn't cause us any problems ....
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wrote:

Just watching a new housing subdivision being done here, what you lot call an estate.
Interesting to see the detail of how the roads are done. Hasn’t got the tarmac on yet, just the hardcore and the concrete gutters so far. The hardcore is quite deep, likely a foot or so. The tarmac wont be, you can see where the top of the tarmac must end up because of the concrete gutters there already.

Ours apparaently use the fast food delivery operations/pizza delivery.

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A *foot* of tarmac seems a little OTT unless there were 40 tonne trucks driving around the front garden.
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On Wed, 11 Sep 2019 19:07:17 +0100, Chris Green wrote:

Dunno about 40 tonners, but there were full-sized tarmac lorries driving on it.
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On 12/09/2019 06:50, Jethro_uk wrote:

The geology of this part of sussex is greensand. Actually there is a layer of red sand all over (and quarries extracting it).
When a trench was dug in the A road going through the village, there was less than a foot of tarmac and hardcore and then a metre thick layer of red sand on top of clay.
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I would be surprised if a foot of tarmac is a good idea.
Much of the strength/support of a road / drive etc comes from the lower levels. Typically, compacted, graded, stones ( sometimes called hardcore but actually far more closely packed that hardcore). Then a layer of coarse tarmac- with larger stones- then a top coat. That is a proper job, not your ‘Left over from another job, cash in hand, cheapie.’
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On 12/09/2019 12:27, Brian Reay wrote:

If you actually resesarch the history of roads, its clear that muddy tracks had gravel and stones thrwown in, and got less muddy: then they discovered that lots of gravel; or limestone made an even better surface, esepceailly with finer particels (cerated from crushing the limestone or adding smaller grades of shingle ) which compacted and held everything together and indeed drained well.
This is pretty much what overseas is called a 'dirt road' garded rock and sand that can ve esily regraded if it gets flooded or potholed
The problem is that it is prone to both and to dust. Mr MacAdam decided to statbilise the top layer with tar so it didnt create dust and it didnt wash away or pothole
Unfortunetaley that made it impervious meaning te road need to be crowned and to have drainage at the side of it. But the tar layer is never more than an inch or two on a new road. Subsequent additions of a new skin may of course increase that.
My personal excpereibce is that round 2-4" of crunch'n' go MOT type 1` limestone is enough for the occasional 30 tonner and more than enough for a car.
Why goes on top is decoration. I piut this on my verge where people used the drive entrance as a layby and its taken all te trucks and has grass growing on top.
Elsewhere it has 1-2" of gravel.
,

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wrote:

There is a very big variation in how dirt roads are done.
At the low cost end, basically a road grader is run over the dirt and nothing is added at all. At the other end, lots of stuff is added and that is what is put in place by the road grader.

And with the roads that have nothing added, immense ruts that are nothing even remotely like potholes.

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On 12/09/2019 18:07, jeikppkywk wrote:

I am currently driving past a new-build section of road every day.
Over the past few months they have levelled it, laid and compacted a deep layer of stones and sand (by the looks of it), put in drainage and kerbs. Last week they started tarmaccing it. The first layer looks to be 4 to 5", the top layer is going on now and looks to be another 4" at least.
SteveW
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