You know all those movies you bought from Apple?

 Um, well, think different: You didn't As the licensing terms change, your 'purchase' can vanish
Remember when you decided to buy, rather than rent, that movie online? We have some bad news for you – you didn't.
Biologist Anders Gonçalves da Silva was surprised this week to find three movies he had purchased through iTunes simply disappeared one day from his library. So he contacted Apple to find out what had happened.
And Apple told him it no longer had the license rights for those movies so they had been removed. To which he of course responded: Ah, but I didn't rent them, I actually bought them through your "buy" option.
https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/09/12/apple_film_rights/
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On 09/14/2018 07:59 AM, iApple wrote:

I consider it (the movie) NOT to be bought until I get it out of their control. "their control" definitely includes their software. It it's just a file, it should be backed up too.
[snip]
--
102 days until the winter celebration (Tue Dec 25, 2018 12:00:00 AM for
1 day).
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On Friday, September 14, 2018 at 3:08:38 PM UTC-4, Mark Lloyd wrote:

If I want to buy a movie, I get it on DVD. I know that anything else is just borrowing.
Cindy Hamilton
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On 09/14/2018 04:11 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I thought Apple was different.  I thought I could trust them.
/sarcasm
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On Friday, September 14, 2018 at 4:11:24 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wr ote:

Apparently you can keep it if you download the movie. But most people probably aren't doing that, because they watch the movie on multiple devices, including TVs, tablets and phones that have limited storage capaci ty compared to a desktop PC. Sounds like a nasty surprise that Apple should warn about upfront. Also, you'd think they could at least send out notification about movies that they are about to pull so that people could download them. But downloading doesn't entirely solve it either, because many people won't have a drive/device to download it to their TV.
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On Friday, September 14, 2018 at 5:01:15 PM UTC-4, trader_4 wrote:
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I guess another possibility is just moving it from the itunes place to another cloud storage? Can the typical streaming player for a TV pull a movie from anywhere you tell it in the cloud? If so, that kind of works. Except that while many places give you 10 or 50 gb for free, that isn't going far to store blu ray movies. It becomes kind of nuts too. Instead of Apple holding one 25gb copy of a movie for a million people, now you have a million people making copies and storing it in the cloud? I would think that won't work for people that want to store anything more than a few. The cloud storage charges probably kills you.
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On Fri, 14 Sep 2018 14:30:44 -0700 (PDT), trader_4

I bet the "I" cloud will not let you store a movie you are only licensed to steam unless you can remove the Apple water mark from the file. Considering the relationship Apple, Google and the other providers have with MPAA and RIAA, I don't think I would be putting bootleg files there in the first place.
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On Friday, September 14, 2018 at 9:25:12 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

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I looked at a couple of tech sources on it, as well as the original article , all say that not only can you download it, but that if you do you can retain it indefinitely. Downloading makes sense, people have been doing that with movies to watch on their PC or tablets on planes, trains and in cars for example.
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On Sat, 15 Sep 2018 08:23:33 -0700 (PDT), trader_4

I am not an Apple guy but I know Amazon and Netflix have specific language in their EULA that specifies what can be downloaded, how it can be played (basically only through their DRM compliant player) and how long you can keep it. You can bet your ass, if they lose the license for that show, it will stop playing on their player. Of course there are plenty of programs that allow piracy by capturing streams as a normal video format and probably to convert those proprietary/encrypted shows but as Nixon said "that would be wrong". The same is true of the storage on DRM compliant DVRs too. If you take the shows from a DSS or cable DVR over to your PC, they are useless gibberish and I haven't seen that code cracked.
Netflix "4.5. Some Netflix content is available for temporary download and offline viewing on certain supported devices ("Offline Titles"). Limitations apply, including restrictions on the number of Offline Titles per account, the maximum number of devices that can contain Offline Titles, the time period within which you will need to begin viewing Offline Titles and how long the Offline Titles will remain accessible. Some Offline Titles may not be playable in certain countries and if you go online in a country where you would not be able to stream that Offline Title, the Offline Title will not be playable while you are in that country."
Amazon is even more specific. "2. COMPATIBLE DEVICES In order to stream or download Digital Content, you will need to use a personal computer, portable media player, or other device that meets the system and compatibility requirements that we establish from time to time (a "Compatible Device"). Some Compatible Devices may be used only to stream Digital Content, some may be used only to download Digital Content, and some may be used to stream and download Digital Content. We may change the requirements for Compatible Devices from time to time and, in some cases, whether a device is (or remains) a Compatible Device may depend on software or systems provided or maintained by the device manufacturer or other third parties. Accordingly, devices that are Compatible Devices at one time may cease to be Compatible Devices in the future. The Amazon entity that provides you the Amazon Prime Video mobile app may be different than the Amazon entity that provides you the Service"
They go on to say
"Content owners use Microsoft PlayReady™ content access technology to protect their intellectual property, including copyrighted content. This service uses PlayReady technology to protect certain content. If the PlayReady technology fails to protect the content, content owners may require the service to restrict or prevent the delivery of protected content to specified devices or PC software applications. In certain cases, you may be required to upgrade the PlayReady technology to continue to access the service's content. If you decline such an upgrade, you will not be able to access content that requires the upgrade."
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On Saturday, September 15, 2018 at 3:03:23 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

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How logical. It's Apple so go to Netflix and Amazon for the information. I can see why you frequently are off the rails. If you check with Apple and t he tech people familiar with Apple, they all say the same thing. If you buy the movies and download them, you can continue to watch them, even if they are no longer available at the Apple store. The story about the guy compla ining does not say anything different.
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On Sat, 15 Sep 2018 12:37:42 -0700 (PDT), trader_4

Apple store. The story about the guy complaining does not say anything different.
Maybe their "genius" did not read their EULA
" - Apple’s delivery of Content does not transfer any promotional use rights to you, and does not constitute a grant or waiver of any rights of the copyright owners.
- You can use Content from up to five different Apple IDs on each device.
- It is your responsibility not to lose, destroy, or damage Content once downloaded. We encourage you to back up your Content regularly.
- You may not tamper with or circumvent any security technology included with the Services.
- You may access our Services only using Apple’s software, and may not modify or use modified versions of such software.
- Video Content requires an HDCP connection."
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On Saturday, September 15, 2018 at 5:02:29 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

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I can see why you frequently are off the rails. If you check with Apple an d the tech people familiar with Apple, they all say the same thing. If you buy the movies and download them, you can continue to watch them, even if t hey are no longer available at the

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Good to see you're finally finding the correct info. And nothing there is i n any way inconsistent with what I've posted from other sources, which is t hat if you buy a movie and download it, you can continue to play it even if Apple no longer has it available at their store.
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On Sat, 15 Sep 2018 14:18:40 -0700 (PDT), trader_4

the

Not if they turn off the bit in the Apple DRM software using that HDCP connection. This certainly does not sound like a regular video file and the EULA says you can't alter the software or the file.
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On 09/15/2018 01:02 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Somewhat apropos:
https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2018/09/sorry-sony-music-you-dont-own-the-rights-to-bachs-music-on-facebook/
https://wikimediafoundation.org/2018/08/27/can-beethoven-send-takedown-requests-a-first-hand-account-of-one-german-professors-experience-with-overly-broad-upload-filters/
https://boingboing.net/2018/09/13/beethoven-is-another-matter.html
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On 09/15/2018 02:02 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
[snip]

"Protect" does NOT mean "interfere with the use of". The movie is not what's being "protected". I wish they'd use the language right.

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On Sun, 16 Sep 2018 10:18:52 -0500, Sam E

They are protecting the intellectual property as in you can not make unauthorized copies and you can only watch that movie within the license granted to the company that owns it. The people who need to correct their language are those who say you are "buying" it. You are only buying the authorized use.
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On Sunday, September 16, 2018 at 3:38:38 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

logy to

No one said or implied anything different. When you buy a VHS tape or DVD t he same applies. Should that language be corrected too?
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On Mon, 17 Sep 2018 03:10:58 -0700 (PDT), trader_4

I am not the one who brought up the "language" issue. You are correct tho. The only thing you buy when you get a DVD is the plastic disk. The content still belongs to the studio. If the disk goes bad, you are screwed (as anyone with a bad cassette, 8 track or vinyl record was). Copying, even to simply back up the content is illegal. So is "sampling". The only thing that is legal is copying content off the air, for your own personal use, thanks to the Sony Betamax decision.
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On Monday, September 17, 2018 at 12:32:17 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

:
hnology to

D the same applies. Should that language be corrected too?

Are you sure about that? I know the local library where movies are heavily used says that they send them back to get new ones when they go bad. Seems like a reasonable, logical process.
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On Fri, 14 Sep 2018 14:01:09 -0700 (PDT), trader_4

They make most of these kind of things "stream only" and I know there are capture programs that will copy them, but it is beyond the scope of your license to use it. (AKA digital piracy) Once you have it, playing it on your TV is trivial tho. You can either plug a PC into the TV or get a smart PC that plays just about any media format you can find (from a USB drive of some sort).
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