Would You Trust This Jack Stand?

wrote:

You can have 3 wheels "on the ground" and still have the jack stand carrying half the weight of the car -

A pair of 2000 lb stands can support 2000 lbs, not 4000. Stands are solad AS A PAIR and the rating is FOR THE PAIR.. So, ONE stand is good for 1000 lbs, not 2000 - and the curb weight of a K-Car is a minimum of 2300 lbs. - so if ONE stand is supporting one side of the front of the K-Car, it will be shifting the weight of the car to the opposite rear wheel - taking load off both the opposite front and the same-side rear wheel - so the stand is taking a load SUBSTANTIALLY over 1000 lbs.
If 2 stands are used under one side of a car, the car transfers weight to the opposite side, and the 2 stands combined are holdinf substantially UNDER half the weight of the car. If the 2 stands are used under the front of the car, depending where the stands are located they can either transfer load to the rear wheels or take load off the rear wheels - so the stands can be taking close to half the weight of the car, or substantially more. 2 to jack stands are "light duty" stands. Knowing how to use them properly is required to be safe.
This doesn't take into account the folly of using them on irregular or soft surfaces, which can put over 30% more load on each of 3 legs contacting the floor if one is not contacting the floor.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 08/10/2017 10:00 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

You wouldn't catch me under a car supported by those contraptions. I use, and will continue to use solid blocks of wood. And to your point, why bother with them when there are other safer options.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Which way is the grain oriented? Using a piece of log, upright the way it grows, is NOT a safe stand for most applications. Building a pilon of stacked 4x4 "logs" is - but it's clumsy
I'm not convinced any other jack stand design is any safer
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In alt.home.repair, on Fri, 11 Aug 2017 20:49:20 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I don't know what Derby does, but those guys who break a board with a karate chop have the board oriented 90^ from the way it looks. People are used to the grain running parallel to the long side of a board, which makes it hard to break a board, but when they do it, the grain is parallel to the short side. People look at the wood and think otherwise, so the guy looks amazingly powerful. I find this all sort of annoying.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, August 11, 2017 at 9:48:12 PM UTC-4, micky wrote:

I'm not quite why I'm mentioned here. I never said anything about wood or grain patterns or karate chops. You may have me confused with someone else.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 12 Aug 2017 13:53:45 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

He has you cofused with someone with thicker skin, it appears.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/11/2017 8:49 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Yah, if you don't know the proper way to orient a block of wood, you'd better put your tools away and call a pro before you hurt yourself.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/13/2017 1:20 PM, Dick Wood wrote:

The 8 x 8 piece of hickory I have seems to work in any direction. It held up a barn for decades before I got it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 08/13/2017 02:00 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Sure! Hickory jack stands are the best.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Old growth hickory would be hard to split even with an axe or maul - so it would LIKELY be safe. I'd still ise any of my purpose built jack stands ahead of the block of wood end-grade up, regartdless. I HAVE used wood, and rocks, and all kinds of other stuff when stuck "in the bush" when nothing else was available - but I was VERY carefull!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/13/2017 8:43 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I just use it as a secondary support if the first one should give out. I don't go under a car with only one support, either a stand or jack. Only takes seconds to be sure.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

After 48 years using various jacks and stands I know what to trust - and a jack stand on sand does not make the cut. A big block of wood strategically placed as a backup DOES make "dodgy" setups a little more re-assuring. (as does a couple og wheels and tires stacked under the car). Wouldn't want to use them as the main support - and always hoping they won't be needed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/10/2017 7:18 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

If I had to compare it to architectural designing, the arch support entryway is stronger than the basic square (90 degree) entryway. The same for arch bridges. The weight is distributed more evenly in all angles than compared to all the weight at the ell angle.
I would use it but I prefer the the conventional jack stands.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, August 10, 2017 at 9:34:01 PM UTC-4, Meanie wrote:

But most arch support entryways don't have 4 welds as possible points of failure. It's not the arch shape that bothers me, it's the welds.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 10 Aug 2017 18:49:23 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Architectural arches are often made of MANY parts - tied together with lime cement (mortar) A GOOD weld doesn't scare me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 08/10/2017 05:18 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I'd feel safe but I'd also feel safe with a jack stand that doesn't cost $140. If you're worried about the welds I'm surprised you're not looking at the pins and wondering what their shear strength is. Ultimately that's what is going to hold the weight up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thursday, August 10, 2017 at 11:59:07 PM UTC-4, rbowman wrote:

I don't need to wonder about the shear strength of the pins because the spec is given in the video.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 11 Aug 2017 03:50:55 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

And as long as the weld strength excedes the shear strength of the pins, it is NOT an issue. Generally (proper)welds are as strong or stronger than the base metal.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, August 11, 2017 at 6:51:04 AM UTC-4, DerbyDad03 wrote:

When I use Jack stands I put another big piece of I beam or similar wood under there too as a safety.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You don't worry that the shear strength might not be up to spec? If it's made in Communist China, I sure would -- I've encountered plenty of "Grade 8" ChiComm bolts that were no harder than a US-made Grade 2.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.