Well pump question

Hello,
I recently had my well pump go bad after 18 years of trouble free service.
My son and I were able to pull it out and I was able to get another pump almost
identical and replace it. We replaced the pressure switch and the air tank at
the same time. Since then, the points on the pressure switch have burned up
twice about a month apart. I have checked the pressure on the air tank and it
is 26-27 psi with the power killed to the pump and no water pressure on the
gauge. The switch is set to drop out at 50 psi and pull in at 30 psi. I read
that the tank pressure needs to be 2 to 3 lbs lower than the pull in pressure
and I have that. Can anyone shed any light as to why my switches are only
lasting a month? What does the size of the tank have to do with it? I put
back a 42 gallon tank that appeared to be the same size as the one we removed.
The pump is a 1 hp submersible pump 390 feet down in the well. I am wondering
if I need to upsize the air tank? Any help will be appreciated greatly.
thanks,
Bobby
Reply to
BGBevill
Hiya, Bobby.
Without thinking about it too hard, I would suspect the check valve between the tank and well head is not holding--this causes leakage at this point and has the effect of spinning the pump turbines backwardes and at startup the cooresponding hi amps draw ( yes in this situation its acting as an unregulated alternator untill connected ) is very hard on the pressure switch contact points.
HTH
Reply to
PrecisionMachinisT
Thanks for your response. I have let it sit and watched the pressure gauge and it does seem to be holding pressure just fine. We did put in a new check valve when we changed the pump for what it is worth.
thanks, Bobby
Reply to
BGBevill
In article ,
Another thing to try is putting a small condenser across the points to supress arcing. AC condenser, twice the voltage than your supply.
Reply to
Nick Hull
Did you replace the controller too???--the caps or relay might be bad......
Also, any possibility you have the windings mixed up ???
Suggest disconnect the pump and get ohms readings, and post them here--also voltage drop and current readings on startup and run.....with this info others might chime in.
=====
I had a similar problem with our old tank, it has the old snifter w/ bleeder type of air volume control.....
The tank kept waterlogging and burning up the pressure switch points, as well as occasionally exploding the start capacitor, etc.
I had a pro in and he pulled the bleeder out of the well head and replaced with new.......he gave the system a clean bill of health, and this has fixed the problems so far--but he did suggest that if it continues to burn up points I should probly use a magnetic contactor to switch the pump load so that the pressure switch will then only see the load of contactor coil........
As a point of referance, this is a 3 hp pump and from the weight of the steel pipe he estimated it at around 200 ft depth--also note that with the snifter, ours only starts out under head pressure, tank pressure being essentially unloaded on startup via the check and bleeder valves.
Sorry I cant be of more help.
Reply to
PrecisionMachinisT
Thanks for the replies. Ours is a two wire pump, so no controller. Before I posted here yesterday, I added a magnetic contactor to handle the pump load as you mention with the pressure switch only handling the load of the magnetic coil. I am thinking this will solve my immediate problem, but was still looking for ideas as to why I am having the problem.
thanks everyone, Bobby
Reply to
BGBevill
ngs on startup and run.....with this info
Newer motors, particularly, high efficiency ones, have a larger inrush current. Possibly they also have a larger "kick" when the starter (your pressure switch) drops out.
The contactor was a good idea. You may want to consider adding a suppressor to your contactor coil to protect the contacts of the pressure switch. See for examples: :
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Reply to
No Spam
High efficiency motors have a larger inrush current than older motors. Maybe your new pump has one. Possibly, they also have a larger "kick" when the starter (your pressure switch) drops out.
The contactor was a good idea. You may want to consider adding a suppressor to your contactor coil to protect the contacts of the pressure switch. See for examples:
formatting link
Reply to
No Spam
I suspect you have a low quality contactor.
Either upgrade or do this: Another thing to try is putting a small condenser across the points to supress arcing. AC condenser, twice the voltage than your supply.
Reply to
PJx

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