Trailer house. $238,000

That's hard to imagine. One could buy a nice regular house in my area for that. The median value of houses with mortgages was about $100,000 in 2013.
<https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2017-11-21/mobile-homes-are-so-expensive-now-hurricane-victims-can-t-afford-them
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replying to Dean Hoffman, Iggy wrote: Agreed! Go figure, Warren Buffet enters the industry and prices "magically" skyrocket...again. Nothing about the both very easy hurricane resistance nor highest energy efficiency. Just wolves upon the prey...again.
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On 11/21/2017 10:14 AM, Iggy wrote:

Not really. Buffet's company reacted to the pre-hurricane market where buyers wanted more upscale mobile homes. It is not a matter of price gouging a giving people what they want.
There is an opportunity here to supply a basic, modest priced home. Rather than gripe about what others chose to make, jump in and start making the cheaper ones.
If you crash your Chevy, don't blame the Caddy dealer because you cannot afford what he sells. You won't find a $5000 Chevy any more either.
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Since this story seemed to be centered around Naples/Ft Myers Fla it should also be noted that these trailers need to be 160 MPH wind code and that is up to 80 MPH more than your average site built home up north. Bear in mind wind pressure not a linear scale. That is the reason why so many get blown up. A trailer set in the 70s only needed to be 80MPH rated if it was rated at all. It also explains why northern houses sustain so much damage in minimal storms that we would not even put up the shutters for.
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On 11/21/2017 12:02 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

That's interesting to know. Thought it was maybe just houses there.
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Nope, even your garden shed has to be built to wind code. We don't see many of those sheet metal things they sell up north and if they are here, they were put in without a permit (illegally). There is no exception for size, square footage, portable or any of the other dodges you get in other places. It is more about them becoming flying debris than the loss of the shed itself. "Portable" means you can put it in your garage before a storm, not that you could pick it up and move it with a crane. Even things like HVAC condensers require tie downs and these days they have to be above FEMA elevation so you see them up on concrete block pads at finish floor height.
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On Tuesday, November 21, 2017 at 3:47:41 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

There's a trailer park (quite a nice one, thus far) located just west of our property. We've always imagined trailers rolling across our lawn like tumbleweeds while we sit snug in our concrete block house. Of course, our roof would present some difficulties for those downwind of us, since I think it's held on by gravity. Still, in 70 years it hasn't gone anywhere. Knock wood.
Cindy Hamilton
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On 11/22/2017 4:36 AM, Cindy Hamilton wrote:

Just lay old tires on top of it to hold it down...
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On Wednesday, November 22, 2017 at 8:49:25 AM UTC-5, rbowman wrote:

Snerk. Good one.
Cindy Hamilton
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On Wed, 22 Nov 2017 06:03:25 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton

They actually do that in some places but if you have a real hurricane, those tires will be going for a ride along with the roof.
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On 11/22/2017 8:37 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I saw a couple of prime examples coming down though Navajoland a couple of weeks ago. Hurricanes are rather rare in northern Arizona but it does get windy.
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On 11/22/2017 8:49 AM, rbowman wrote:

I don't think it is too hard with new construction to tie down roof to walls. Gravity is depended to keep the roof on but wind might overcome it and a few extra braces, whatever, make sure gravity is not overcome.
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More than a few.
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On Wed, 22 Nov 2017 03:36:46 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton

Most northern homes are pretty much held together by gravity. The trusses are toe nailed into the top plate and that is end nailed into the studs. If it is sitting on block there may not even be nuts on the "J" bolts that are just mortared into one cell of the block holding the top plate down. In Florida the roof is continuously connected to the foundation by simpson connectors and block walls are reinforced with about 20% of the cells poured solid and #5 rebar continuous from the foundation to the 16" poured tie beam on top. Then embedded straps go over the trusses.
They have required tie downs on trailers since the 60s and they have to meet the same wind code as a site built home. There was a time around 2000 that nobody in the US built a Florida compliant trailer. It was a problem because you can't get a permit to move an existing, non-compliant trailer and install it somewhere else.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com posted for all of us...

What "J" bolts? We don't need no stinkn j bolts up here. We have enough dead weight in PA to hold everything down...
--
Tekkie

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wrote:

Until you don't ;-) Most hurricane damage to structures is because of uplift and internal pressure lifting the roof off or taking a stick built house right off the foundation. You guys saw that during "Mediocre Storm Sandy" that was only "super" because the houses were not built to take even a minimal tropical storm.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com posted for all of us...

ote:

see

the

g

dead

I agree. I can tell you know I was be facetious. There was a hurricane in P A several years ago in new housing development near a nuclear power generatin g station. All flattened... Gen station didn't even have an alert.
The weight I was referring to was from the govt. I know my house would be a goner.
--
Tekkie

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On Wednesday, November 22, 2017 at 10:36:18 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

That's certainly what I've seen in stick-built houses up here.
I'm not even sure I've got a top plate. The birdsmouth on the rafter might just rest on the top course of concrete block. The only studs in my house are in interior walls. I'm sure my husband has seen the junction of roof and walls, but he's not available for me to ask right now. It's all buried under insulation, since we don't have any soffits.

We've got those on the shop that we built in 2006: <http://www.fastenersplus.com/Simpson-H8-Hurricane-Tie-G90-Galvanized?gclid=Cj0KCQiA3dTQBRDnARIsAGKSflk0j4yhGROP35bugpRDniVQ7MCoIa6cnxSI6Sx6Fi--L7d6JJtbYDIaAr4gEALw_wcB
Nailed 'em in with my own lily-white hands. (You can always tell a lady by her hands.)

That's hardcore. Still, I can see why.

I'm pretty sure the trailers next door are tied down in some way. Maybe not as well as down there.
Cindy Hamilton
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On Wed, 22 Nov 2017 13:46:11 -0800 (PST), Cindy Hamilton

Those H8 "twisties" are better than toe nailing but they don't meet code for much down here. You use something like this for the trusses.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Simpson-Strong-Tie-18-Gauge-Hurricane-Tie-H16/100375116
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On Thursday, November 23, 2017 at 12:22:17 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Granted. On the other hand, the code for footing depth is deeper here, because of frost. We each have the code we need for our conditions.
Cindy Hamilton
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