Rust Ring under Turntable of Microwave Oven: Was Over-Watering with Boiling Pasta Water To Blame Or a Messy Roomie?

My roommate has been using our landlord's microwave in the common area to boil her pasta (in a 1 Qt t-ware plastic bowl for 20 minutes approx. 1-2 times per week for the past year. /(IMO, I think it's more economical to use the gas range since natural gas is way cheaper than electricity in our area, but she thinks it takes too long.) /
Well, the rust-ring of doom showed up on the bottom of the microwave, under the glass turntable recently and yesterday she decided to write a note to all users about cleaning their messes better. I told her the "mess" was rust, and she was causing it by boiling her pasta in water for 20 minutes in the microwave where as everyone else uses it for mostly 2-3, or at the most 10 minute cook jobs. She said I'm wrong because her bowl was large enough to prevent the water from boiling over the sides. I tried to tell her that boiling water in an enclosed area such as a microwave for 20 minutes created enough condensation to thoroughly flood the bottom of the microwave and even when the microwave oven is clean, sometimes it's hard to see the water, but eventually the little wheels that move the turntable start to remove the paint, causing rust and then bare metal which may then start to spark and catch on fire.
She doesn't believe a word I'm saying, so maybe I'm wrong. It's just my theory. Does anyone know the cause of the "mysterious rust-ring" on the bottom of our microwave?
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Marielle posted for all of us...

If it's rust it's in-just, if it's food get in the mood...
So, in other words what is it, rust or food?
--
Tekkie

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replying to Tekkie®, Marielle wrote: To Tekkie: The answer to your question is: It was NOT food - the paint wore away, the metal was bare, a red-ring of rust was all that was there. The muss was confirmed to be rust, the microwave oven has been replaced.
I answered yours, now can you answer mine? Is boiling water in a microwave for 20 minutes on a regular basis the cause of rust under the microwave oven turntable? She won't believe it unless someone more qualified than me tells her. Personally, I'm almost 100% sure it's the cause because several years ago the same thing happened to my microwave oven after using an as-seen-on-TV "pasta boat" (an oblong microwavable container that boils pasta in 17 minutes - about the same time as a stove IMO). I never noticed the standing puddle of water under the turntable until after the paint had chipped off and the metal started rusting, but that was years ago, I learned from my experience. Hopefully, she'll learn from hers and stop trying to blame other people.
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Clean it. Do not be a slob.
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replying to Thomas, Marielle wrote: To Thomas: Sorry, I thought I made it clear - the mess was rust, not food. I have no problem cleaning other people's messes, I just have a problem with being blamed for them.
I must not have been very clear when typing my inquiry; because two people have replied so far, and neither of you seem to be able to understand my question. So as not to receive anymore gems of wisdom such as "Clean it. Do not be a slob." or "If it's rust it's in-just, if it's food get in the mood... ", I'll rephrase my question:
QUESTION (rephrased): If someone uses a 1 quart plastic bowl in a microwave oven to boil pasta for 20+ minutes at least once a week, sometimes more often - will doing this cause enough water condensation inside the microwave oven to create a puddle of water underneath the glass turntable that will eventually wear away the paint and cause the bare metal to rust?
Now that I've rephrased my question and hopefully made it easier to comprehend, maybe I'll get more meaningful replies with some useful information.
Thank you for your time.
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On 6/24/2017 10:14 AM, Marielle wrote:

My wife might do potatoes but covers bowl with Saran wrap. We still have rust problem from moisture. 20 minutes to cook pasta sounds excessive as spaghetti takes less than 10 minutes. There is no advantage in using microwave to do this. Constant boiling is not necessary. You can hold near the boiling point without vigorous boiling. At least wipe the microwave and leave open to get rid of moisture.
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replying to Marielle, Marielle wrote: I must not have been very clear when typing my inquiry; because two people have replied so far, but neither seemed to understand my question. So as not to receive anymore gems of wisdom such as "Clean it. Do not be a slob." or "If it's rust it's in-just, if it's food get in the mood... ", I'll rephrase my question:
*QUESTION (rephrased):* If someone uses a 1 quart plastic bowl in a microwave oven to boil pasta for 20+ minutes at least once a week, sometimes more often - will doing this cause enough water condensation inside the microwave oven to create a puddle of water underneath the glass turntable that will eventually wear away the paint and cause the bare metal to rust?
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"Marielle" <

Boiling pasta for 20mins in a microwave in a plastic bowl is just plain STUPID !!!
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On Sat 24 Jun 2017 08:34:13a, Phil Kangas told us...

Yep, cooking food in the microwave for extended periods of time may be fine if the container is relatively closed, or contains a modest amount of liquid, but a bowl full of water to cook pasta makes no sense. Most likely, every surface inside the cavity (including the bottom under the revolving glass tray) will be covered with a huge amount of condensate. If you have to do this, then the entire cavity should be thoroughly wiped down, including removing the tray and ring and floor of the cavity. By the tinme you've done that, you cold have recouped the time by simply cooking it on the stovetop. Some people hve absolutely no common sense.
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Wayne Boatwright posted for all of us...

This post effectively address' your post. So if you consider me an expert then tell her to stop doing it at my report. This report can be obtained from the Tekkie Institute.
--
Tekkie

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replying to Wayne Boatwright, Marielle wrote: Thank you. I'm going to send her a link to this page..
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On Saturday, June 24, 2017 at 11:51:48 AM UTC-4, Wayne Boatwright wrote:

Agree, boiling water to cook pasta is going to saturate the oven with moist ure, it seems likely it will remain wet, especially in spots like under tho se wheels for a long time. Whenever I have something that generates signif icant moisture, I leave the door open after so it can air out.
I would also think that it probably costs more to boil water in the microwa ve like that than on the gas stove they have.
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On Sat, 24 Jun 2017 17:57:39 -0700 (PDT), trader_4

Not to mention, steam can be quite corrosive.
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On Saturday, June 24, 2017 at 9:29:12 PM UTC-4, Stormin' Norman wrote:

isture, it seems likely it will remain wet, especially in spots like under those wheels for a long time. Whenever I have something that generates sig nificant moisture, I leave the door open after so it can air out.

owave like that than on the gas stove they have.

And maybe the plastic bowl releasing god knows what into the pasta, especia lly if it's not designed to be used that way. I'll warm up food in plastic, but even that I'm not too keen about.
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On Sat, 24 Jun 2017 18:52:51 -0700 (PDT), trader_4

I agree about the outgassing from different plastics. We always use Pyrex type glass dishes, bowls and covers in the microwave. Sometimes we use paper towels to wrap ears of corn for cooking, but if were me, I would always use glass.
I am also quite fond of using the pressure cooker. For many things it can be far superior (faster, better tasting, etc). Artichokes, potatoes, larger amounts of corn on the cob, beans, etc, all benefit from the pressure cooker.
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replying to Phil Kangas, Marielle wrote: Thank you, I agree! Especially when there is a perfectly good gas range available just barely 2 feet away.
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On Saturday, June 24, 2017 at 3:14:12 PM UTC+1, Marielle wrote:

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On Tuesday, July 31, 2018 at 1:33:49 PM UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Best advice 'e' manufacturer.
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