PVCcleaner

When working/repairing pvc pipe is it really necessary to use the blue pvc cleaner? Please advise Herb
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On Thu, 11 Apr 2019 11:16:50 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

You can use the clear in the yellow can but if it is being inspected they want to see a little purple ring on the pipe at the joint. The cleaner/primer does make the joint much stronger. It breaks the surface oxidation and allows the cement to penetrate better,
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On Thursday, April 11, 2019 at 2:25:08 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

+1
Also depends on what he means by "working with". If it's for water pipe under pressure, I'd say absolutely yes. If it's making one joint to make a reaching pole to poke at something, you can probably get away without it.
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On Thu, 11 Apr 2019 14:24:53 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

https://www.plumbingsupply.com/the-great-pvc-primer-debate.html
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On 4/11/2019 7:28 PM, Vic Smith wrote:

Stuff I used called for two coats so it might be primer and adhesive.
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On Thursday, April 11, 2019 at 7:28:26 PM UTC-4, Vic Smith wrote:

Couple of things. I assume these tests were done at room temp. IMO, too many tests at room temp, none at min and max temp. I think min is ~40F? Solvent could have a more significant effect at temp extremes, perhaps at low end. And what kind of pipe? Brand new PVC? Or twenty year old PVC that your are patching onto? Nice and clean? Or with some dirt on it? Yeah, we know it's supposed to be clean, but we all know what happens anyway. That solvent is loaded with acetone and you can see it melting the plastic, so any old surface, some dirt is going to get taken off and at least distributed around the joint, leaving fresh PVC exposed. The glue itself is thicker and seems less likely it's going to work past old PVC, dirt, etc.
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On Friday, April 12, 2019 at 9:48:26 AM UTC-4, trader_4 wrote:

I wondered about that too. I've done some work in a cold basement. Even i n the summer early in the morning it can be chilly.
What was really interesting was the time it took to develop full strength. Those tests showed 24 hours, while most people (including me) assume these joints are strong pretty much as soon as they set. I would think in cold temperatures the strength would develop even more slowly.
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On Friday, April 12, 2019 at 10:52:53 AM UTC-4, TimR wrote:

oo

?
in the summer early in the morning it can be chilly.

. Those tests showed 24 hours, while most people (including me) assume the se joints are strong pretty much as soon as they set. I would think in col d temperatures the strength would develop even more slowly.
I think the cement cans say something like can be handled in X mins, OK for X lbs pressure at 2 hours.... IDK what the exact numbers were but I know it said something like that. And also I think that was at room temperature.
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On Fri, 12 Apr 2019 08:00:54 -0700 (PDT), trader_4

That is what the blue is for. It sets in 10 minutes or so. Most guys doing repairs use that. One thing they didn't address is the "cleaning" part. If that pipe has "been around" the surface needs a good scrubbing, particularly if it was underground but just being out in the light makes them get a chalky coating. (like in that outside bay at Lowes/HD where they store it before it comes inside). Virtually all trade suppliers store it outside.
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On 4/12/2019 10:52 AM, TimR wrote:

Cure is essentially solvent evaporation which would be slower at lower temperatures. Solvent slowly diffuses through the PVC. Odor may remain a long time after the joint is about as strong as it is going to get.
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On 4/11/2019 2:16 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Do you mind if it leaks? Yes, you get a better joint if you do it the right way.
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On 4/11/2019 2:16 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I had to repair some PVC several weeks ago. I was just looking at my can of PVC adhesive and it gives specific instructions about wiping off the cut part after chamfering and then how to apply the adhesive. There was nothing about using PVC cleaner.
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