Patio door lube?

What's a good lubricant for patio doors, those glass doors that slide in metal tracks? I'm afraid oil will attract dirt and cause a need for frequent removal of dirty oil and its replacement. I suspect grease would have the same problem. Graphite wouldn't work. So far I've just been leaving them alone and vacuuming them out when they get too much dirt in the tracks. I seldom use them - once in a great while for moving furniture or large appliances in and out or if I should accidently lock myself out, which has not happened so far.
What do you successfully use?
TIA
--
I love a good meal! That's why I don't cook.







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As you point out, lubricants will attract dirt and dust, making it harder to clean the tracks later.
Best to keep the track clean and make sure the door wheels (or equivalent) are in good shape so they roll easily.
--
charles

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On Wed, 14 Jun 2017 10:00:50 -0700, Charles Bishop

Exactly You need to remove the door, clean and lightly lubricate the wheel bearings. If the bearings are compromised, replace the wheel assemblies. It is a whole lot easier than replacing a damaged track when the wheels drag and gouge it.
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Bearings? You are making the assumption his sliding door even has bearings.
I suspect many doors, out there, are as cheap as mine. No bearings and the wheel adj blocks are shot (stripped threads in the cheapo alum adj blocks). You may be better off replacing sed sliding door with a better one, though it's gonna cost you! I hadda take a 4-1/2" right-angle grinder and open up the frame to allow the near-broken wheel adj blocks to allow the wheels to even engage the floor rails.
I'll be replacing it, eventually. Sad! 8|
nb
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On 6/14/2017 1:44 PM, notbob wrote:

BTDT. Original builder quality aluminum frame was replaced after 12 years. The Pella was replaced after another 22 years. Now I have a Marvin that should outlast me.
As others stated, the fix is to repair or replace the wheels. I did that once on the Pella but a few years later the door rotted internally where it held the wheel assembly. Best fix is to replace it with something other than a slider, but this 8' in my family room looks out to the woods and I don't want to give up the view.
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There is some kind of bearing in there. A better door will have ball bearings, cheap ones use oilite bronze bearings. YMMV on lubricating them but usually something like 3 in 1 oil will work for a while. Usually you can find the whole wheel assembly at a good door shop and the more popular ones are at Ace.
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They don't slide, they roll - I haven't lubed mine in over 30 years and they are doing fine. I've replaced the rollers on the screen - they are pretty trashy.
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In alt.home.repair, on 14 Jun 2017 16:49:33 GMT, KenK

I don't lubricate them but there are other things to consider.
I probably have medium quality doors. At any rate, they are thermopane and the smaller one** moves easily with one hand after 38 years, and no other flaws have shown up. Well, not counting that the aluminum frames are oxidized a little, and maybe pitted a litle (but I really should look before I say that.). (My landlady with windows and a sliding glass door just 4 years old had beautiful windows with vinyl(-covered?) frames.)
Somehow one or both of mine had to have the wheels lowered, which is done by turning the screw at the each end of the door, although maybe only one wheel will need this. Lowering the wheel raises the door so it doesn't rub on the track. It might have helped -- I can't remember*** -- to use a pry to lift the door and take the weight off of the adjustment, even though leverage is in your favor. It might have helped to spray light oil or wd-40 on that one screw, at each end, if adjusting it was hard.
I also took out the sliding part of the smaller door. I was 30 years younger then but it was heavvvvy. I could handle it, but it wasnt' that easy, almost tripped over kitchen things, and it surprised me and it might have gotten away from me. I would want a helper if I did it again and that was the smaller of the two. (I think I wanted to drill a hole in the track and the door was in the way, but if you ever want to replace the wheels, you'll have to remove the door.) .
**The bigger one takes a shove to get it moving, but then it rolls okay.
***I guess I did this a long time ago and haven't had to do it since. Maybe they weren't adjusted right when the doors were put in???
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