Outlets per circuit ?

Just wondering how many outlets are allowed per 20A circuit . I've been limiting it to either 4 or 5 ... I could put more , but I've got this bigass power panel and I hate overloaded circuits . Exceptions to the 5 limit are the dishwasher and refr are on one , washing machine and one outlet where it used to be are on one , stove outlet and 3 counter top outlets are on one - 2 ckts are designated for the island when I get it built , that's where the kitchen appliances will live . The big AC unit in the dining room is alone on one . I've got 23 of 30 populated , though not all are hooked up yet . As it stands now 4 of those have not been dedicated - one will probably go to the cellar for both outlets and lights and another for outside outlets , leaving 2 open for whatever and 5 unused stations . BTW , those outside outlets will be in a GFCI device , whether in the panel or in the first outlet in the string .
I started running power to the bedroom today , I'm trying to keep all this straight in my head . I wrote them down on the back wall of the box , but now they're all obscured by wires ... oops . Got most of them on the front panel cover now , but need to clean that up and make some more detailed labels . On another subject , the plan is to run the outlets in both bathrooms from the same 15A GFCI breaker , probably wire nut pigtails to the incoming wires for the actual connections to the breaker . Might not be to "code" , but it'll be about the only thing that ain't . We don't have codes or inspections out here in the woods , but I don't see that as a reason to not do it right .
--
Snag
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I will defer to other, more knowledgeable folks on # of outlets per circuit.
But if you're in the US, you may want to at least conform to National Electric Code (NEC), so that if there's ever a cause for an insurance claim, an insurance adjuster and/or fire inspector could see it was done, at least, to that standard.
Btw, seem to recall the NEC says bedrooms&Living rooms get AFCI breakers, and bathrooms need 20Amps with GFCI outlets or breaker(s).
Also I highly recommend this guidebook: (Amazon.com product link shortened)
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On 6/14/2017 10:29 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I'm not sure what all the hoo-hoo is about AFCI breakers , unless it's because people are using the push-in terminals on the back of the outlets . I don't , always use the screw terminal and always make sure they're tightened properly . So far there's only one place where I have made connections anywhere but at the outlet/switch , and that's inside a metal box , not plastic . I was going to pull power for the cellar there , changed my mind and decided it gets it's own circuit . Out here where we live the volunteer fire dept sucks , I'm trying to be proactive about the possibility of an electrical fire . One of our neighbors had an electrically caused fire , nearly lost their house . I don't know who did their wiring , might have been the home owner .
40 + years of construction experience has given me time to learn from the other trades (I was a cabinet maker) and my work looks better than most ... plumbing too .
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On Wed, 14 Jun 2017 20:29:54 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

If you want to put a 20 amp in the bathroom you will need a GFCI breaker unless the US sells 20 amp GFCI outlets that we haven't seen here. . .
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On Thursday, June 15, 2017 at 2:45:45 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

IDK what the problem is in Canada, we have them here in the US. I have a 20a gfci receptacle in my kitchen.
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On 6/15/2017 1:45 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

They're available , around 10 bucks on eBay .
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wrote:

Yeah, they are available now up here too I see - $30 at Home Despot. Were not available 18 months ago.
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On Thu, 15 Jun 2017 14:45:54 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

They do, pretty much the same price as a 15a but if there is more than one receptacle on that 20a circuit, a 15a device is legal. Most GFCI devices have 2 receptacles.
<http://www.homedepot.com/p/Leviton-20-Amp-125-Volt-Duplex-Self-Test-GFCI-Outlet-White-R12-GFNT2-0RW/205996739>
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On 06/14/2017 11:29 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Too bad they didn't publish a Kindle edition...I'd grab a copy.
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On Wednesday, June 14, 2017 at 10:47:49 PM UTC-4, Terry Coombs wrote:

For a residence you can have as many as you want.
I've

Not sure what that means, seems to imply that the stove and those 3 are on the same circuit? Code requires min of two 20A circuits for counter top receptacles only.
2 ckts are designated for the island

that should meet the min then.
that's where the kitchen appliances will live .

Per code, it needs to be 20a. Given what one hair dryer can pull, 20a for each would be better, unless ones a half bath.

Also, most areas, eg kitchen, laundry, bed room, need to be on AFCI.
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On 6/14/2017 11:13 PM, trader_4 wrote:

Another post indicates that I use 80% max , based on an average load of 1.5 amps/outlet .

Those outlets on the counter top will only be used for light loads , all the "big" loads will be on the island circuits . The big loads right now are on a separate temporary circuit that will be taken out when the island is built .

We don't use hair dryers ... though a later owner/tenant/guest might . Recommendation noted . The least expensive solution there might be to put the master bath on a standard breaker and use a GFCI outlet . Can't change the other bath without major work , it's wired with 14 ga and the walls there are finished .

This AFCI deal is fairly new isn't it ? If I've got wiring connections arcing I have fucked up ...
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On 6/15/2017 12:13 AM, trader_4 wrote:

I was in my hose 30 years and found out that one of the kitchen counter outlets is on the same circuit at one in the dining room. We went from a 2 slice toaster to a 4 slice and with the AC in the dining room on, it tripped the breaker.
Breakfast this morbning is bacon, eggs, and your choice of toast or air conditioning.
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On 6/15/2017 8:52 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

And that's exactly the sort of problem I want to avoid . As I understand it , every time a breaker trips it can decrease the load capacity . So far we haven't tripped a single one ... and I want to keep it that way .
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Actually running a circuit at near max WITHOUT tripping the circuit can cause even more problems. You end up with one of two situations after a long period of time:
1) The breaker will trip too quickly with a load much under the rated one or 2) The breaker won't trip even with a dead short.
I have seen #2 happen. Fortunately, there was no resultant fire, but it was an eye opener.
Being on the local Fire Dept, I have seen my share of electrically started fires. None of which were caused by a faulty breaker though...
Dan
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On Thursday, June 15, 2017 at 5:40:39 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Do you know of any cases where an insurance company has not honored a claim because of an electrical fire caused by sub-standard and/or DIY wiring?
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On Thu, 15 Jun 2017 16:22:12 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

No, but I do know of cases where a fire was caused by "illegal activity" where the insurance company won a judgement against the insured or the insured's family. Kid making canabis oil in the basement with butane blew the house up. The insurance company paid out $400,000 - then won a judgement for $400,000 plus costs when the kid was charged and convicted.
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On Thu 15 Jun 2017 06:52:47a, Ed Pawlowski told us...

We have a tiny kitchen with only 2 outlets, each on a separate circuit. With various countertop appliances to use, we must pick one over the other at any given time. For example, I can't run the coffee maker and toaster at the same time as they are both located at the same outlet. Likewise, multiple appliances complete for use at the other outlet.
Our co-op was built in the 1950s, but was completely re-wired sometime in the 1980s. We have a 200 amp panel, but there was no logic in what was combined for any given circuit. We've the strangest combinations. At least they had the forethought to have some switched outlets in every room, as there are no ceiling lights. Ceiling outlets for the ceiling fans have no wallswitches. We bought fans that have remote controls rather than dealing with pull chains.
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On 06/15/2017 09:02 AM, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
[snip]

My house (built about 1969) has a strange combination, where the receptacle behind the refrigerator in not quite on a dedicated circuit but shares it with the bathroom light. The bathroom is not right next to the kitchen but is between electrical panel and kitchen, so it was easy for the electrician to do that.
[snip]
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That is legal but points out why the 2 small appliance circuits is a minimum standard. Typically, if you know you will have an AC, you will pull in a dedicated circuit just for that, (perhaps swapping in a space heater in winter)
"(B) Small Appliances. (1) Receptacle Outlets Served. In the kitchen, pantry, breakfast room, dining room, or similar area of a dwelling unit, the two or more 20-ampere small-appliance branch circuits required by 210.11(C)(1) shall serve all wall and floor receptacle outlets covered by 210.52(A), all countertop outlets covered by 210.52(C), and receptacle outlets for refrigeration equipment."
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On 6/14/2017 10:47 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:

The rule of thumb is to apply 1.5 amps per receptacle.
NEC specifies that a circuit breaker shouldn't handle more than 80% of the load for which it is rated unless the breaker is labeled otherwise. Therefore, 10 outlets for a 20 amp circuit keeps it at the 80% required load.
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