OT. Slowest line



Bill Hammack, the engineer guy, explains why one seems to be stuck in the slowest moving check out line at stores. He relates it to the early phone systems.
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On 09/29/2018 12:15 PM, Dean Hoffman wrote:

One of the worst situations is when I'm behind someone with a notebook. The notebook is a bad sign. I don't mind someone using coupons, but they could have selected which ones they're going to use before getting in line (same problem with checks, they don't do anything in advance). And then those notebook people have to argue about every coupon, and search their cart for the item.
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Either that or something that I think is similar to a food stamp type of book. Every item has to be checked to see if it is on the list.
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In alt.home.repair, on Sat, 29 Sep 2018 18:04:17 -0400, Ralph Mowery

I wonder what that is. Food stamps are replaced by a credit card-like thing , and the computer knows what is on the list and what isn't. At least in the USA. Unless it's a very small store. Are you in the USA?
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On Saturday, September 29, 2018 at 6:04:26 PM UTC-4, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Are there no computers? The only thing I can compare this to is manufacturer's coupons. After all items have been scanned, coupons are scanned. If a coupon doesn't match anything in the previously scanned merchandise, it's rejected.
Cindy Hamilton
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In alt.home.repair, on Sun, 30 Sep 2018 04:58:26 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I don't think he's talking about coupons but about things one is allowed to pay for with food stamps. I haven't had that job but it's basically snacks, food ready to eat is not covered. Candy bars are not covered and food that they consider optional is not covered so maybe not candy at all. I don't know if pre-made sandwiches are covered. I think not, because even though supermarkets sell that, it's like restaurant food and not covered. But anyone who has been at the job for a couple weeks will usually know all this stuff by heart. Well, looking at the list below, maybe not 2 weeks but 6 months. Plus like Cindy says, if the cash register is connected to a computer, it should know.
[After reading what follows, there appear to be a lot of mistakes in what I wrote above]
https://www.wisebread.com/heres-what-you-can-and-cant-buy-with-snap What you can buy with SNAP
SNAP and its beneficiaries have plenty of critics, often people who feel that low-income individuals should be limited in what they are allowed to purchase with public funds. Critics of those critics would say that prescribing their shopping lists is intrusive. Generally, the rules limit SNAP purchases to food products, with some limitations and exceptions.
Energy drinks Energy drinks such as Red Bull have been available for purchase with food stamps since 2013, when companies making them began changing their labels to list "nutrition facts" instead of "supplement facts." Critics have tried to have them removed from eligibility, but as long as they are classified as a food item, they are likely to stay.
Luxury items Since they are clearly food items, you can, in theory, buy steak, lobster, shrimp, or any other high-end food with food stamps. Legislators have proposed removing such items from the program, but in reality there is no need: Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that people in the income group low enough to qualify for SNAP hardly buy any beef or seafood (only about 10 percent of the average monthly grocery bill), because it's too expensive.
Junk food There is some truth to the impression that a lot of SNAP recipients buy junk food. A 2011 USDA analysis found that 23 cents of every SNAP dollar goes to sweetened beverages, desserts, salty snacks, candy, and sugar. (The other 77 cents goes toward meal ingredients, such as milk, bread, meat, cereal, and vegetables.) However, non-SNAP households spent 20 cents of every dollar on those same sweet treats. So shopping habits were similar, regardless of payment method.
Nutritionists have expressed concern about the amount of junk food purchases funded by SNAP, which is meant to improve health, not to contribute to health problems such as obesity. But attempts to cut junk food from SNAP run into problems both with complexity and with the discomfort of making the government the judge of which foods are worthy and which aren't.
Another approach, presented in a 2016 paper in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, would be to provide incentives for purchasing healthy foods, either alone or in combination with limits on junk food purchases.
Birthday cake While you can't buy hot prepared food items, you can buy baked goods. Muffins, cakes, and cookies purchased at grocery stores and some bakeries are fair game.
Holiday items Since they are technically edible, you can buy your Halloween pumpkins with SNAP — but not decorative gourds. Gift baskets, prefilled stockings or prefilled Easter baskets can be purchased as well, but only if at least 50 percent of the contents are edible items and the basket contains no prohibited items. For example, you could buy a holiday stocking with a few small toys and a lot of candy, but not a large stuffed bear holding a small box of chocolate.
K-Cups You can purchase coffee to make at home, in any form, with your SNAP card. This includes single-use pods such as K-Cups, instant coffee, cappuccino mix, whole bean, or fresh ground coffee.
Taco Bell (sometimes) The vast majority of SNAP recipients are limited to buying groceries with SNAP. But in some states, elderly, disabled, and homeless SNAP recipients can participate in the Restaurant Meals Program. In Arizona, participating restaurants include Taco Bell, Denny's, Subway, and others.
Seeds In 2014, SNAP began allowing participants to purchase seeds and plants that produce food, and launched a site to encourage gardening. Produce at the farmers market
You can legally buy fresh fruits and veggies, as well as homemade jams and honey, at farmers markets. The only catch is that most stands only accept cash, while SNAP functions as a debit card. The government is working with local markets to change that, including publishing a directory of farmers markets that accept SNAP and setting up incentive programs such as bonuses for SNAP users.
Food from online grocers The USDA is operating a pilot program allowing SNAP users to order groceries online. This could be a boon to people living in food deserts and homebound elderly and disabled people, not to mention parents of small children and those who work long hours and can't get to the store. (See also: 6 Ways Having Your Groceries Delivered Can Save You Money)
Cocktail mixers While you cannot use SNAP for alcohol, you can buy mocktails, bloody mary mix, tonic water, or margarita mix.
Things you can't buy with SNAP
Despite the fact that we just listed a wide range of items that you can buy, there are actually plenty of things you are not allowed to purchase with SNAP benefits. Some make perfect sense; there's no way taxpayers are going to fund cigarette or alcohol purchases. But there are valid arguments that some of the following items should be covered.
Rotisserie chicken Those hot roasted chickens in the deli are sometimes cheaper, pound for pound, than raw chicken. [???] And for people who don't have access to a kitchen, they could be included in many healthy meals such as chicken tacos or chicken salad. However, most SNAP recipients can't purchase any hot prepared foods, including these.
Toiletries Since they are not food, you can't use SNAP to buy household items such as soap, laundry detergent, diapers, sanitary napkins, or toilet paper. Since these items are essential, this restriction can be a hardship for SNAP recipients.
Pet food As mentioned above, a petition asking the federal government to include pet food in the SNAP program recently received more than 230,000 signatures. While there's a valid argument to be made that pet ownership is a luxury that the American taxpayer shouldn't have to support, the counterargument is that pet owners that fall into poverty are more likely to give up or abandon pets if they can't feed them — and housing these pets in shelters or euthanizing them costs the public money.
Grocery bag fees More and more local governments are discouraging waste by requiring stores to charge for grocery bags. SNAP cannot be used to pay those fees, and the local law may not exempt SNAP users. So SNAP users should either bring their own bags or be prepared to pay for disposable bags with cash.
Food shipping charges SNAP users participating in the trial of online grocery ordering must pay any delivery or convenience fees in cash.
Live animals While you could buy live crabs to cook at home, you can't use your SNAP card to buy a piglet to raise or a cow to milk — even if it would save you money and provide more nutritious food in the long run. Livestock just isn't part of the program.
Alcohol and cigarettes Alcohol and cigarettes aren't food, they're not nutritious, and the public doesn't want to pay for them.
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On Sunday, September 30, 2018 at 9:23:13 AM UTC-4, micky wrote:

I get that. "Coupons" was an analogy. I still don't understand why the cash register doesn't just handle all of that.
Cindy Hamilton
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In alt.home.repair, on Sun, 30 Sep 2018 06:51:33 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Oh, I agree.

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On 09/30/2018 08:23 AM, micky wrote:
[snip]

I knew of a woman trying to buy dog food with food stamps. She took it back and got steak for her dogs. That was covered.
[snip]

I certainly don't.
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In alt.home.repair, on Sun, 30 Sep 2018 10:02:30 -0500, Mark Lloyd

LOL I wonder if the dog will share.

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On 09/30/2018 07:23 AM, micky wrote:

It was well before the SNAP program but that was one of my friend's complaints about food stamps. iirc another was the store would give change in store coupons that had to be redeemed at the same store.
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On 09/30/2018 06:58 AM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:
[snip]

Apparently, these people don't even decide what coupons to use until they're being checked out.
If one of my coupons is rejected, I normally save it for use next time. That is, if the cashier doesn't insist I do something more complicated NOW.
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In alt.home.repair, on Sat, 29 Sep 2018 14:07:49 -0500, Mark Lloyd

Or they're using a credit card and don't know they can put the thing in, and their PIN before the final amount, so they only have to push one button at that point. There was a hand-made sign up saying that for 2 or 3 weeks but the store gave up.
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On 09/30/2018 01:41 AM, micky wrote:

.
Walmart attracts a lot of low-life welfare democrats.  Maybe try shopping at an upscale store?
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On 09/30/2018 05:26 AM, Snarky wrote:
[snip]

A local grocery store (not Walmart) has 6 checkout lanes, 3 of which are express (15 items or less). The last time I was there, the express lanes were open and had no more than 1 customer each. Only one of the regular lanes was open and it had 5 or 6 customers waiting.
OT: the countdown in my sig reminded me of "Get Smart", one of the TV shows my parents liked in the sixties.
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On 9/29/2018 1:15 PM, Dean Hoffman wrote:

Very interesting. I noticed self checkout lines can be slow but Walmart where I go has maybe 10 but one line to enter. There were maybe 10 people ahead of me the other day but zip and I was out.
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Walmart here has about 20 lines with registers to check you out, but only two or maybe 3 have anyone at them to check you out. Then there are several employees just walking around.
In years past it took some skill to enter the items correctly. Now with the scanners I am sure most could be taught in a few hours to do the basic checkout.
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On 09/29/2018 04:08 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Unlabeled produce can be a problem with the cumbersome code lookups. I generally get the same things so I quickly learned 4011 for bananas etc. I was surprised when shopping in a store from another chain that the same code was used. I don't know if that was a coincidence or if the codes are uniform.
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rbowman posted for all of us...

It might be another store in the same chain, IE Kroger's. Or the database might be under the same UPC or ...
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Tekkie

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On Monday, October 1, 2018 at 4:54:14 PM UTC-4, Tekkie® wrote:

ith

.

Produce codes are standardized by the International Federation for Produce Standards: <https://www.ifpsglobal.com/Identification/PLU-Codes
Cindy Hamilton
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