OT: automotive electrical connector loose, power window

On 7/26/2017 7:55 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

In states with no safety inspection the accident rates are no higher than stated with them. When lived in PA, inspection was a joke. Many shops were either incompetent, or ripped people off claiming they needed expensive work. I had cars that would not legally pass but always had a sticker.
I don't know of any state where you don't pay for emissions testing. We don't need it tested for five years here.
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Having done safety checks for something like 20-22 years, you wouldn't believe what came through (and what was occaisionally passed by another shop, then ended up in mine for repairs) I also did safety checks for the Canadian Street Rod Association at Natiomnals and Regionals - and again you'd be SHOCKED at some of what came through the lanes. We took a few rods off the street and I'm sure we saved a few lives. We sent a TERRIBLE Henry J from New York back to the US border on a flat-bed. How he got back home I don't know (or IF he did - it was that bad) Our provincial safety checks are only at time of sale, unless pulled over on a roadside check and obvious shortfalls are found. Some insurance companies will require a DOT check if a vehicle is over a certain age - particularly on "new business".
It's suspension and steering, bodywork and exhaust, brakes and chassis, and lights and glazing.
It prevents (or at least reduces) sale of vehicles that are deathtraps as driveable vehicles. Things like carbon monoxide poisoning from seriously leaking bodywork and exhaust, brake failure from bad lines, hoses, oversized drums or thin rotors etc, loss of control from failed suspension/steering/chassis parts.
The Henry J had a Pontiac 428HO, and the steering linkage was cheap hardware store 3/8" drive socket extentions and "U" joints - flopping all over the place. All-thread was used to hold suspension together instead of proper hardened bolts.
I've seen some just as bad in DOT inspections - repairs that made "bush league" look good -unibodies patched with nothing but roofing cement and tar paper - and perhaps a license plate or two in the footwell areas. Headlights pointed every direction except straight - and even installed sideways or upside-down, and switches hanging out of the instrument panel, with headlights rewired with plastic coated clothes-line cable - and that's just for starters.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca posted for all of us...

I never saw things as bad as you describe but I know they existed from some 'cream-puffs' we saw.
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Tekkie

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On Wednesday, July 26, 2017 at 9:04:25 PM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

rm

ks.

nd




NJ is free, state inspection stations. But you wind up paying for it in tax es. The test just reads out the OBD data. Agree that I've never seen anyt hing that shows inspection relates to highway safety. NJ doesn't care if y our wheels are falling off and your lights don't work, it's emissions only. And now that it's only that, I don't see accidents where the cause is attr ibuted to mechanical issues.
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Ed Pawlowski posted for all of us...

Not at our shop...
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca says...

Also, some states, like Texas, check for window tint. The glass needs to be able to have the tester slide over the glass and unless it's a convertible that's hot easy to do if the window can't be rolled down.
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On 7/26/17 7:55 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Free?
What, the emissions fairy pays for them and builds, staffs, and maintains the inspection stations? The taxpayers foot the bill for your "free" inspections, you ninny.
You must be one of those do-gooder/virtue-signalling liberals who believes in free college, free healthcare, and free room and board for those too lazy to work and for the broodmares who squirt out an illegitimate welfare baby a year....
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wrote:

The "inspection stations" are privately owned and financed companies that do other things as well - oil change outlets and general repair garages. They used to charge $35, submitting about half to the government. Now the government pays them something like $15 per inspection - and if rhe car fails, you pay full pop for the retest. The inspection charge comes out of our gasoline taxes and licence/registration fees, apparently.

No, I am oneof those who has worked for my living since I was 14 and has never collected UI or been unemployed for more than a week in my life. I also am smart enough not to compartmentalize everyone as a liberal or a conservative, ot a commycrat or a reb.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca says...

In North Carolina the inspection is a big ripoff. At one time I had a car that was in good shape and had been going to an inspection place for several years. He hardly looked at a car, just slapped on a sticker. Went to him one year and he said his garage was full of cars to be repaired and it was raining. Told me if I wanted a sticker to scrape off the old one and put the new one on myself..I also had an old beater of a truck. It was ok to drive, but doubt it would pass a good inpsection. Same deal, the man just stuck on a new sticker with out looking at the truck.
I went to a different place that mainly worked on cars. The car I had was only about 3 years old. Nothing wrong with it. The inspector told me he could not pass it becaues it did not have a catylitic converter. I told him I bought the car new and nothing had been done to it and if it did not have the converter it was like it came from the factory. Another man there looked and told him the converter was under the hood in the engine compartment.
It was about the same with another place. They did finally have to hook up the computer with the newer cars, but that was all.
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On Thu, 27 Jul 2017 13:30:02 -0400, Ralph Mowery

Another difference between north and south of the 49th, I guess.
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On Thursday, July 27, 2017 at 11:46:43 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

+1.
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On Wednesday, July 26, 2017 at 11:32:00 AM UTC-4, Wade Garrett wrote:

IDK where you are, but NJ, NY, PA, had inspections long before there was any emissions testing.

M
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trader_4 posted for all of us...

+1 You beat me to it.
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wrote:

Ever try to go through a toll booth, or go through customs at the border, with a window that won't open???
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On 7/26/2017 7:45 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Not a problem. The woman in front of me on the Garden State Parkway had a system. Pull up to the exact change basket, put car in park, slid over and get out on passenger side, run around to drop the money in the basket, run back, etc.
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On Wednesday, July 26, 2017 at 8:42:42 PM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Or just pull up a little further and open the door.
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On 7/26/2017 11:13 PM, trader_4 wrote:

That assumes the door works too! This one had a crinkle in it. EZ Pass would be the cheapest solution but I don't think it was available back then.
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wrote:

Think a little more. What makes the connection "tight" It is not the block. It is the spring tension of the connectors on the pins. The connectors MUST be loose in the block to allow them to move and align to the pins. You need to understand how those connections work. I do. Which is why I have been giving you accurate advice on how to fix the problem. Either replace the connections ot solder them.. Go to an auto wreckers - there is sure to be a "pick-a-part" type place near you - and getr the connectors from the latest model vehicle you can find that uses the same switch. That will take a bit of research - but Google is your friend on that count. Take the plugs, with as much wire as you can get (6 inches or more) then cut the old plug off and solder the new one on. Get the switch too, for good measure -.
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TimR explained on 9/22/2016 :

Still no photo to go by, but just from your description it sounds like the female ends of the connectors are loose.
Usually, the individual sleeves or pins can be extracted from the connector block and be made to fit tighter and then reinserted back into the block. You may have to fashion an extraction tool to depress the barb which holds the female connector in the block.
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On Thursday, September 22, 2016 at 10:36:05 AM UTC-4, TimR wrote:

w, though none of the others have to work.

mbling, cleaning, and polishing, I got it to work intermittently. Swapping with a known good switch I finally found the real problem: the connector doesn't stay on the pins tightly. Slight finger pressure will make good co ntact and the window works fine, but otherwise not. It's a 1991 Volvo if t hat makes any difference.

h on, there are four sockets in the connector and four fat pins on the swit ch. I'd swap with one of the other three, but the four switch connectors a re all shaped uniquely and can't be repositioned.

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fixed it last year, and succeeded by luck.

es as well as several others (mirror adjustments, child locks, etc.) Verti cal finger pressure downward operates the window. Press down on the back o f the switch (it's a rocker) and the window goes down; press on the front o f the switch and it goes up.

. The connector has four female sockets that mate with the switch. The wi ring harness has 7 connectors. If I pull the entire switch assembly out of the door panel, and press lightly upwards on the bottom of the connector, the switch will work.

se I found a Volvo web site that explained in detail how to disassemble the switch and clean corrosion and said this was a known failure mode for that car. And it did seem to work. This year I cleaned the switch contacts AN D swapped it for a known good switch, and the symptom remains. Pressure on the connector makes it work. The "bad" switch works fine in the new locat ion.

harness wire loose on the socket connection. If the latter is the case th is will be a pain in the butt to work on, it's a large wiring harness burie d deep in the door panel with almost no slack.
If you need to take the door panel off, they typically aren't hard to do. Like many things, the internet has been a big help. Check youtube for videos on how to do it for your car. The big thing is knowing where the screws are that you need to remove.
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