Now , about Linux Mint ...

Mon, 24 Apr

I don't disagree with you, but, I like the fact I can use the machine as if it were another computer on the network while it provides limited file access to others. Think of it as an adhoc windows network server. Makes more sense to you that way?

RHEL is a fantastic option, but, it's not free as far as I know. https://access.redhat.com/products/red-hat-enterprise-linux/evaluation Unless the 30day evaluation is not just the OS, but, support? And the OS itself is still 'free'? I'm a bit unclear concerning that.

I've never gotten into the Raspberry...What makes it so interesting to you? [snip]

I understand. To each his/her own. :) I really don't care for the GUIs present on Vista onwards, I really like XP's GUI...And wish MS didn't fuck it up...Alas.

LOL! I know what you mean.
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That makes less sense since I don't think Windows works very well as a server. :) But I see what you're saying now.

CentOS is the code from RHEL with various logos and brand names stripped out and then compiled. It's free (as in beer as well as in freedom).
RHEL is the product that RH sells support for. Support in this case includes patches and updates, as well as extra documentation and things like that.
IIRC, a desktop license for RHEL is only $49/yr., and you get some support (I don't remember if it's e-mail-only or what) plus access to their extra documentation and knowledge base and I'm thinking it includes access to some private forums too.
What I was saying about my workplace is that I'd like to use RHEL for production systems, and then depending on how the support contract is written, use CentOS for dev systems or temporary test beds, etc.

Part of it is size. I just think it's amazing and really cool that we can pack so much computing power into such a tiny space.
I'm also very interested in it because it is very power-efficient. You can run quite a few of them and still not come anywhere near the power usage of a typical laptop or desktop system.
A typical RPi system is also all solid-state, with no moving parts. You don't even need a fan in many (if not most) cases. So you can just mount the whole thing on the wall in a closet or your basement, or on a shelf somewhere. It means I can put a powerful computer in a lot of places I couldn't before.
Then we get to the uses of such a system, and I admit that I haven't fully explored those. I've looked into setting up streaming audio and video, and doing home theater type of stuff. I've also looked into home automation a bit.
One thing that I'm going to do early on is setup a wall-mounted touchscreen monitor with an RPi mounted on it in the kitchen so my wife and I can look at recipes or even watch videos or whatever while we're in the kitchen. I suppose we could do the same thing with an Android tablet, but this could have a much larger screen and I feel I'd have more control over what software is installed and what's running, who it's communicating with, etc.

I feel that the Windows UI reached its zenith in Win 2K. :) The whole Luna look of XP just seemed to be a bad case of Mac OS X envy.
I do admit that XP had some good features that Win 2K didn't. They applied enough of a band-aid onto "DLL hell" that it no longer caused so much hassle for most people. They also added restore points, so you stood a chance of being able to roll-back something that hosed the system.
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I'm ok with subscriptions for support, and not so ok with subscriptions that force you to pay every year or the product stops working.
Since RH makes CentOS available for free, I think it's reasonable for them to sell support - if that's something you want.
It's probably better to pay for support than the method that more traditional software companies use to keep money flowing in; keep producing new versions. If they have to keep cranking out new versions with new features to keep the revenue stream going, they're not going to spend time fixing bugs or reducing other technical debt, and they'll keep adding features whether people really use them or not.
I think that's the whole problem with all of Microsoft's software. The priority was shipping new versions, and they never fixed old bugs. Whatever sort of works so the sales creatures can claim X number of features, and just shit it out onto the market. Who cares if it's crappy and full of bugs? We'll fix the worst problems after release, and then it's time for the next version. In fact, leaving bugs in the current version gives you things to promise will be fixed in the next version. :)
Perhaps they have now realized that selling new versions of Windows won't work because the desktop market isn't growing anymore. They make money on OEM licenses of Windows with new computers, and then they make a lot of money on Office. I don't know how much of their revenue comes from business customers, but they had basically changed that to a subscription model a long time ago, with "software assurance" and things like that. Even the MSDN subscriptions from years ago came with software and I remember Microsoft salesmen saying that if you bought MSDN you wouldn't need to buy any licenses for other Microsoft software. (I don't know whether that was actually true or not. I never really bothered to check into it, but then I wasn't really very interested in using any of that other software.)

It's regular flash memory. I've seen micro SD cards used and also USB thumb drives. It's not soldered on the board or anything like that.
I think in most cases you're not storing a lot of data on it, just whatever software you're using and the configuration files. So it's relatively easy to replace the storage.

For audio I'm looking at something like the Hifiberry DAC+. https://www.hifiberry.com/products/dacplus/
piCorePlayer looks interesting. https://www.hifiberry.com/build/software-selection/
I'd combine that with a server running Logitech Media Server. I haven't decided how I want to do the server, but it might be easiest to run LMS on a NAS device. For instance, you can install it on FreeNAS, or on a Synology NAS if you want to buy a complete NAS device instead of building your own.
Another option might be Rune Audio. You don't need a server as such with this, just a network share or attached storage for your music files.
Or how about Kodi on a Pi?
https://mediaexperience.com/raspberry-pi-xbmc-with-raspbmc/
Home automation?
http://www.techradar.com/how-to/computing/raspberry-pi-projects-1311001/4
Here's one of many articles on using a Raspberry Pi to run a firewall:
https://opensource.com/life/16/3/firewall-your-home-network-raspberry-pi
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Wed, 26 Apr

Microsoft isn't alone in this respect. Sadly, many software companies have opted to go this route, too. Malwarebytes being a very good example. It's as if they took a section of Microsofts own playbook and are using it, to the letter.

Ah. Replaceable then. That's a good thing. [snip]
I'll check those links out at a later date. Thanks!
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Could you stop the ad?
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Tekkie? wrote:

The problem is that avg appends that at MY end when I receive the email/post , and what you're seeing is what someone that quoted me didn't snip . I'd love to turn it off , haven't figured out how yet ... it's not annoying enough to go back to (shudder) Avast . I'm not going to worry about it right now , this comp is due for a serious (for me) OS update to (probably) 7 Pro/64 bit as soon as my RAM arrives ...
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On 04/07/2017 08:24 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:

To avoid the possibility of screwing up your Windows system, disconnect the hard drive completely and on a spare hard drive install Linux
Now you can experiment all you want...
I've been using Linux since the year 2000 and it's now my main OS
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Apr 2017 23:32:43 GMT in alt.home.repair, wrote:

I like it quite a bit myself. Really like it. The desktop is so much different than the old shell accounts I've had since I was a young teenager. [g] I can take a more hands on approach now, instead of ssh/telnet sessions that just aren't the same. Speaking of 2000, I actually retired from Vx that year. It was time.
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On 04/08/2017 06:56 PM, Diesel wrote:

I had computer experience back in the old punch card days but by 1982 I got damn sick of computers and swore I'd never touch one again.
Other than using an old DOS inventory program at work, I pretty much had no contact until my (now) wife gave me her old P-1 in 1999.
It did not take me too long to get back into things and within six months was quite used to win9x...so I needed a bigger challenge.
Have to admit I was clueless regarding Linux at first. From the time I got my Red Hat 5.2 CD until the time I got it installed and everything properly configured...was about six months...but I learned a lot!
Now Linux is very easy to install and use but to a newbie there are still a few things that might be a little confusing...but for the most part there is nothing to it.
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Apr 2017 13:33:20 GMT in alt.home.repair, wrote:

I was learning sco unix, I think it was via shell accounts prior to my first experience with linux in the mid to late 90s. Most of the mainframes I was gaining shall we say, unauthorized access to were using unix....What's a bored kid with a computer to do right? :)

I can't say as I found that series of machine a favorite. Very proprietary, totally turned me off of it.

SX or DX? When we ran boards, windows 95 wasn't so hot on those machines once you went multiline. OS/2 warp OTH, ran swell. Available applications were very limited, and that's IBMs fault. They didn't do anything as far as serious advertising goes. So, few developers took it seriously. If it had IBMs support behind it, it would have rocked the socks off anything MS was offering at the time. Especially when you consider MS was working jointly with them until they had a falling out. And thus was born MS own 'version' known as Windows NT.
And the rest as they say, is history...

I'm not familiar with ECS. :)
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One good thing about most of the old IBM PCs of the '80s is that they came with good keyboards. I know a lot of people who used their IBM keyboards long after the PC it came with was landfill.
As for vintage PCs, I have a hard time thinking of any PC that I've thought was interesting enough to keep around as more or less a curio. I have an Apple IIGS Woz Edition though, and wish I had an Altair or maybe a Heathkit H11... :) I also have some old Sun hardware that I've fired up occasionally, but I'll probably chuck even that since it's not that fun to play with compared to say a Raspberry Pi.
I just don't have enough time to play with all the cool new toys there are, let alone old ones.

I never ran any of the DOS-based Windows versions, and don't associate the word "great" with any of Microsoft's software. (Although I suppose you could say that much of it is a great PITA.)

I used OS/2 from 2.1 to Merlin and was pretty happy with it, but I've talked to people who developed apps for OS/2 and they say that it wasn't that wonderful. It had IBM working on it, where developers were judged by how many KLOCs (1000s of Lines Of Code) they could churn out, so not much in the way of elegant code got added in that way. Then you had some clowns at Microsoft where they didn't care about the quality of the code, they just wanted to crank it out, sell it, and then fondle their stock options. I've read that Microsoft also did some things to sabotage the OS/2 development effort, and of course they left a lot of stuff half-finished when they screwed IBM and concentrated on Windows 3 instead.
The core of NT was evidently quite good, but the people who were developing the GUI parts also decided that it would be a good idea to try to learn C++ at the same time. I've read that Cutler was not happy with how they turned his silk purse into a sow's ear.

I think that's EComStation, which is what OS/2 is being called these days. I thought about seeing if I could get it running in a VM, but could never drum up enough interest to do so. (I've played with an Amiga emulator and a Commodore 64 emulator in the past, and once I got it up and working, I was at the "what do I do with it now?" stage and I suspect it would be the same with OS/2.)
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On 04/13/2017 05:34 AM, Bud Frede wrote:

At one time I had a lot of those good/ sturdy click/clack keyboards, I think I only have one left/

I use to spend hours fooling with those antiques but packed away or gave away all of them

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Thu, 13 Apr 2017 10:34:20 GMT in alt.home.repair, wrote:

I do wish I'd kept my coco3...It was my first computer.
I don't know what happened to it.

Same here.

ROFL. :)

It did have some issues some serious with the way in which it did things and expected you to interact with it, but, still not as a bad as it was during win3.x days. And, as another poster commented, you could fuckup your code in one console/session and cause a cascade crash throughout the OS. That sucked ass at times...

When writing the kernel for an OS, that's not the time to practice a new language. :(

Ahh. That explains it. I haven't seen os/2 (or warp) since the board was taken down for the last time, it was time for the SysOp to attend college and it was time for me to be moving on as well. So, I never kept up with it. I do miss those days though. Things were so much different. a good board had something very close to a real family. We'd goto cookouts, help each other out in person, etc. Nothing like things are today.
I even remember a weekend I spent at my buddies house who ran the board. It was time to do a system wide backup. He asked how much space I had on my 486DLC/40 (yea, cyrix) along with the other CoSysOps. We networked them with cat5 (practically unheard of then) and did a major data backup, spanning across to other machines so he could replace a bad hd and put the data back and get the board back up and going. That was fun as hell man. For all of us. Was our first time actually hands on networking the boxes in that way. [g]

I loaded an apple emulator a few months ago. I did the same thing as you when I got it running. Okay, cool, just like I remember it. Now, WTF am I going to do with this thing? I have NOTHING it knows about, and, nothing I have outside of it's emulated world will even talk to it.. so.. what good is it now. lol.
So, I fired up oregon trail and ran it for a couple of hours. Other than the trip down memory lane as a kiddo, it was of no further use. It was kind of neat that I remembered all the keyboard commands and was able to get out of the running game and edit variables on the fly; the old 'cheats' still worked. [g] Of course they would have, the computer and game thought it was the 80s. heh.
I still play nintendo on an emulator from time to time on my linux lappies. Avoid the noid, Mike tysons super punchout; before Nintendo re-released it without tyson. Last night, I played a game of super mario brothers 3. If my linux machine was self aware, it would probably seriously question the point in emulating 8bit hardware on it's 64bit platform. As in, "seriously dude? WTF are you doing? I'm basically idling doing this, you know that right?" lol
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I knew quite a few people who ran boards. Other than one guy who ran his board on a Commodore 64, they used either Desqview or OS/2.
One of them was quite large and was PCBoard on OS/2 with multiple nodes and quite a few phone lines. I don't remember the details, but he actually had a separate building for the board, and connected it to his house with thin net. (He ran the thin net through a garden hose and buried it so it wasn't visible.)
He also had nice computer desks and computers connected to the network for each of his kids and for his wife. It was the first time I had seen anyone with a LAN in their house. :)
He didn't survive the transition to the Internet though. He thought that he could provide some Internet services through PCBoard and keep all of his subscribers. I told him repeatedly that people would just want a SLIP or PPP connection so that they were more directly connected.
He was sort of right in that AOL did much what he was doing, but was much more successful at it. However, ISPs offering dialup probably grabbed the majority of his customers, since BBS users were mostly computer hobbyists, and they liked the less-controlled experience of being a part of the net and being able to choose what client software they used for various services, etc.

I've played some of the old Apogee Commander Keen games in dosbox, and I also tried out a few games with MAME. It was kind of cool seeing Donkey Kong and Centipede again, but you really need a joystick to play those arcade games and I'm not that into games that I'd buy a good joystick and set things up.
I played a lot of pinball as a teenager and when I was in college, and played some of the arcade video games, but still preferred pinball. When I started using personal computers, I never really got into games; there were always too many other interesting things to do with a computer. :)
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Thu, 13 Apr

I had/still have? the regged versions. Spent a few weekends writing saved game editors for them and Duke Nukem. Prior to the 3d editions.

Same.

Same here. :) Once I learned how to code initially, it opened a whole new world for me. The computer wasn't in control, I was. [g]
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I still use a genuine IBM PS/2 keyboard, connected via a USB adapter.
A company in Kentucky still makes this type of mechanical keyboard, available with USB or PS/2 interface:
http://www.unicomp.com/
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On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 02:40:50 -0000 (UTC), Roger Blake

Nice keyboard - at $115 US
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

hmm, mine was in the 80s.
note they are not identical to the original model M's that came with the IBM PC, but they are close enough that i can type like a monster once again (after many years of typing on keyboards that had no depth or touch to them).
the original keyboard was metal and weighed quite a bit. when i gave the PC away in '96 i regret giving that keyboard away. this one is a plastic case (and creaks when i move it).
songbird
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wrote:

I loke my Rocketfish BT keyboard. It doesn't click but has a reasonable feel to it. My favourite years ago was the Keytronics KT104
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Oh yes, the clicky clack keyboards. Heavy bastards too. You could knock somebody out if you hit them upside the head with one and it wouldn't hurt the keyboard. [g]
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