Insulating UNOCCUPIED Attics in Residences

I have always gone by the philosophy that the overhead(roof) rafters should not be batted unless the attic will be fully sheet-rocked, climate-controlled and lived in, and only the attic floor(ceilings below) should be insulated.
Am I correct?
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On 2/7/2019 9:46 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

  That's the I've always seen it done . That's the way I'm doing it in the house we're building - 4/12 pitch roof leaves a little room for storage , no way enough space for any kind of room .
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Snag
Yes , I'm old
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On 2/7/2019 10:46 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Keeping heat in or out? yes, that is the traditional method. In the south where it gets hot they now use a reflective barrier on the roof rafters to reduce the solar load. I had it added when my house was built but I've only been here six weeks so I don't know how well it works.
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Well, nowadays I'm seeing on TV, and in houses I've visited, insulation between the rafters in, as I've stated, attic used only as storage(the Christmas tree, luggage, unused toys awaiting tag sale, etc).
Even on 'THIS OLD HOUSE' in an episode featuring a 'Net Zero' energy project, the roof consists of no less than three layers of styrofoam insulation and vapor barriers, the final roof planking, another barrier, and finally, the shingles A total of 20" of insulation BELOW the shingles!
So I guess techniques are changing. But I continue to recommend the old fashioned way - NO insulation under the rafters of an attic where only the Samsonite family, and Barbie & Ken, reside.
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On Thu, 7 Feb 2019 19:46:11 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I think the crux of the issue is not really insulation - but rather ventilation ... is your "storage " area going to be well ventilated to the great outdoors - or sealed off from outside temperatures ? John T.
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7:40 snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.ca wrote:
"I think the crux of the issue is not really insulation - but rather ventilation ... is your "storage " area going to be well ventilated to the great outdoors - or sealed off from outside temperatures ? John T. "
In a traditional unoccupied attic, the only thing the roof keeps out is the beating sun in summer, and precipitation and strong winds year round. Other than that, it is ventilated, around the edges where the eaves meet the attic deck, and optionally, via a ridge vent along the peak. That is why we insulate the attic deck(the ceilings of the highest rooms in the house).
This should be common knowledge John.
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On Thu, 7 Feb 2019 19:46:11 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

On Fri, 8 Feb 2019 05:35:54 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

How clever ! You've answered your own question, apparently. :-) I have seen old 2 1/2 story houses where the "attic" is not really "living space" ie: has no HVAC nor electricity, but has a walk-up access and therefore is used as storage space. These areas will have whatever ventilation and insulation combinations that 100 + years of numerous homeowners have deemed proper at the time. <buyer beware> John T.
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On Friday, February 8, 2019 at 8:35:59 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Agree. The OP doesn't say how the attic is ventilated. Without adequate ventilation, air won't move to equalize humidity levels between inside and out. Also, is there a vapor barrier on the insulation in the attic, facing the living space? Is he sure that all bath vents, dryer vents, etc are properly run outside and not into the attic? And regardless of all of the above, I would think there would be periods where the humidity level inside the attic will be much higher than outside. If it was humid outside at 65F and then at night the temp quickly drops to 35F, the humidity will go up until enough air moves to equalize it again.
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