Concrete section next to hardwood!

I am having my hardwood floor refinished. An old fireplace that was on a co ncert block was replaced with a wood stove so now part of the old block is
covered with ugly ceramic tile. Any suggestions as how to handle a replacem ent? The concrete is level with the hardwood floor & I was hoping to avoid an elevated ridge.
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On 7/29/2020 3:15 PM, Abby wrote:

Take out the ugly tile and put in nice tile or slate.
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On Wednesday, July 29, 2020 at 4:39:21 PM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

a concert block was replaced with a wood stove so now part of the old block is covered with ugly ceramic tile. Any suggestions as how to handle a repl acement? The concrete is level with the hardwood floor & I was hoping to av oid an elevated ridge.

+1
tile or stone sounds right. Maybe a wood trim around it.
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On 7/29/2020 2:15 PM, Abby wrote:

Is the stove still there or has it, too, been removed now?
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On Wed, 29 Jul 2020 12:15:50 -0700 (PDT), Abby
If you really want it level. I would cut out the concrete, put in a mud bed and try to match the floor. The other problem is cutting out that concrete is dirtier than refinishing the floor. You can build a tent around it to mitigate the dust but it is still messy. This is also one of those times when you really need an N-95 respirator. The other problem is the new floor won't match so you are stuck with a contrasting something. It might be possible that your floor guy has some aged oak he could use and make it a little closer to a match. The pros know more than I do about this tho. I still use a lot of red oak here and I know matching old wood is tough. Usually it takes years for them to get close in color if they ever match at all.
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In alt.home.repair, on Wed, 29 Jul 2020 12:15:50 -0700 (PDT), Abby
You didn't answer whether the stove is still there or not.
If not, what do you plan to put there?
If they're the same level now and you cah't take out the concrete, I can only recommend paint of some sort.
I've had good luck, in terms of appearance and probably longevity, with auto paint like dark brown. because it's shiny, even without clear coat.
Mediium brown metallic or dark brown metallic. Of course the cement is not metallica but it will still look good. YOu may need some kind of primer for it to stick, I don't know.
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On Thursday, July 30, 2020 at 12:49:44 AM UTC-2:30, micky wrote:

concert block was replaced with a wood stove so now part of the old block is covered with ugly ceramic tile. Any suggestions as how to handle a repla cement? The concrete is level with the hardwood floor & I was hoping to avo id an elevated ridge.

Thanks everyone for the advice. Yes the wood stove is still there surrounde d with brown brick. I removed the tiles and now I see a piece of concrete t hat is level with the wood floor. Don't want to get into the mess of removi ng concrete to allow for wood. I like the idea of painting the concrete, pe rhaps the same colour as the brick?? and have the floor refinisher put a tr im around it. BTW, the contractor suggested covering it with wood but I thi nk that would be too high of a ridge. Again, thanks for your thoughts - muc h appreciated!
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On 7/30/2020 8:04 AM, Abby wrote:

You cannot put wood under a wood burning stove. That is why concrete and tile were use. Fire code.
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On 7/30/2020 9:29 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

And you wouldn't want to even if were able...
I don't know if some of the laminates are rated for use or not, but clearly this is a place to either put some nicer tile back down or take the paint or some other suitable option. I've seen a sheet of 1/8" or so steel used--serves as an additional radiator to the room as well altho not advisable if have toddlers unless screened.
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On Thursday, July 30, 2020 at 10:34:06 AM UTC-4, dpb wrote:

ete

Tile or stone would sure look a lot better with the refinished wood floor than painted concrete.
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On 7/30/2020 9:33 AM, dpb wrote:

My stove sits on top of about 2"+ of Arkansas field stone . It has the same behind it and on the wall to the left side . Depends on the kind of stove I suppose , but the floor under mine never gets very warm at all . And the wall behind and to the side seldom gets over about 120° unless I'm burning it wide open for several hours . By then to house is way too hot to be comfortable ...
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On Thu, 30 Jul 2020 05:04:42 -0700 (PDT), Abby

Look into concrete acid staining. If you then seal it with a shiny sealer you can get some pretty interesting designs. You still might have to grind it to get any old grout or mastic off, depending on how the tile was set
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wrote:

I'd knock off the old tile, fill in any pits and cracks, and apply an epoxy "rock" finish
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wrote:

I doubt that meets the fire code either. Epoxy out gasses some pretty nasty stuff when it burns.
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