Cigarette Smoke Detector

snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I've never heard of a cigarette smoke detector. Several years ago, I read an article in the NEW YORK TIMES about the management of an apartment building on the Upper West Side of Manhattan that wanted to restrict the building so that all new tenants would be non-smokers. It was hoped that, eventually, the building would be a smoke-free building. All current tenants who smoked would not have been affected. They could stay, but no new smokers would have been allowed in the building. Apparently, some smokers started protesting and began legal action even before the smoke-free proposal got off the ground. I don't remember the details, such as whether it was a co-op or a rental building. I vaguely remember one of the smokers saying that a smoke-free building would be discriminatory. Another claimed that he had a disability and, therefore, needed to smoke. I can't remember whether he thought his disability was the need to smoke or whether he had some other disability that forced him to stay at home all by his lonesome self with no pleasures in life except the "pleasure" of smoking -- or some such nonsense. Again, I don't have the details, but you can probably search for it in the archives.
Frankly, I would LOVE to see smoke-free apartment buildings. Although I am currently staying in a house, I have spent most of my adult life living in apartment buildings, and I am sick of being exposed to second-hand smoke. I hate the smell of cigarette smoke, and not a week goes by when we don't hear of the dangers of second-hand smoke in the news.
Perhaps, if your friend has a building smaller than eight or five units, he might have more leeway as far as what he can dictate. In some communities, tenants have more rights when the building has eight or more units. Does your friend intend to live in the building? If so, then perhaps he can tell prospective tenants that he or a family member has severe, life-threatening asthma or bronchitis and cannot be exposed to smoke.
I think stricter laws should be passed regarding non-smokers' rights. Granted, you can't tell a tenant what they can do in the privacy of their apartment (I think that has something to do with the tenant's right to the quiet enjoyment of the premises), but the problem with smoking is that it goes well beyond the privacy and confines of the apartment where it is occurring, and it DOES affect other tenants in other apartments. It affects the health of the other tenants and the peaceful enjoyment of THEIR apartments. Smoking also damages property. The odor of cigarette smoke can linger for YEARS. I bought a used textbook at Barnes and Noble about 15 years ago. The previous owner was a smoker and, to this day, the pages of that book still smell of smoke. They don't smell as bad as they did when I bought the book, but you can still tell that it was exposed to cigarette smoke.
I think your friend should definitely consult a lawyer to see how he can make his property smoke-free.
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chemqueries wrote:

In fact, he's buying it for a disabled (!) family member who does have asthma. I couldn't agree with you more on everything you say and am amazed, considering the incidence of asthma among socioeconomically deprived children who live in projects, that HUD has not outright banned smoking in-and-out of public housing. It's cruel and unusual, not to mention discriminatory, treatment of the underprivileged. (There, I spoke my mind.)

Yeah, it looks as if this will have to be the case--or at least the local municipal magistrate's record, to see if he was every called upon to adjudicate issues regarding second-hand smoke. What I don't understand is the *legal* basis for all the "no-smoking" apartment advertisements you see now-a-days in the classified sections of newspapers.
Maybe more on topic as far as this newsgroup is concerned, I should ask how much in general (and I do mean "in general") replacement of ONLY the "stucco" ceiling of a three-room apartment would probably run. On sites such as MrLandlord.com, there are suggestions about ridding smoke from walls--such as, of course, scrubbing them, and ripping out carpet. But this stucco crap on the ceiling would have to be entirely torn down.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Thats actually the simplest part. A lease *is* a legally binding contract between two parties. As long as the contract is mutually agreed upon and properly executed it is enforcable.
And the ads show the beauty of a free market at work. Clearly there are people who want to live in a smoke free environment or the landlords would not be able to include the no-smoking prohibition.

That would be totally dependent on what the material is and what the condition of the underlying surface is. If you are going to hire someone to do it the simplest approach would be to get some estimates.
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On Thu 08 Sep 2005 10:03:57p, chemqueries wrote in alt.home.repair:

WHAT A CROCK!
--
Wayne Boatwright *Ώ*
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chemqueries wrote:

I'd give you the right to stay home.
A
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

He needs to contact a local attorney. Local laws will dictate both what would be considered acceptable evidence, how it may be obtained and even if it is legal at all.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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replying to pennsylady2002, droyce wrote:

Yes there are such things........ Trying to find the price on them and some reviews ..... now that is a bit more problematic.
So far I have found this site that has no prices.... thinking it might be expensive, but the beauty of it is that you can have it send you a text message. I do not know if any laws would prevent this type of thing....... given that it is legal (in my state) to have a lease that says no smoking..... I would guess it is, but because I would figure it was only effective if the tenant didn't know about it, I am not sure that part is legal. :(
http://www.cigarettesmokedetector.com/evidence-collection.htm
I also found this one..... but it is from the UK and because it uses the Lithium battery they cant ship it to the US.... (You could contact them to see if they can ship without the battery and if there is one in the US that can be used instead.)
https://www.locksonline.co.uk/Puff-Alert-Cigarette-Smoke-Detector-and-Remote-LED-Indicator.html
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tobacco smoke is a scurge on our world. adults shouldnt be allowed to smok e around children, since its really CHILD ABUSE. and should be proscuted. I grew up in a smoking home, it was horrible. I was always sick with ear in fections colds etc. even children around a smoking parent who only smokes o utside can gets ill from the stentch on their clothes
To mitigate odors, including urine stentch, tobacco stentch. whatever the s tink..... heres how to solve it. you cant clean it off to get rid of odors, since they are absorbed into walls, floors etc.
first scrub everything down with real TSP cleaner, then rinse 3 times with fresh water so the tsp doesnt interer with sealer adhesion, then paint all walls etc with the oil bassed kilz, give it 2 coats, leave a day or two be tween to allow it to dry. toss everything like carpeting. with wood floors sand and refinish, with OIL BASED POLYURETHANE. if you use water based poly everytime the weather is moist the smell will reappear. have all ductwork cleaned and deodorized, and the furnace and AC coil. every surface must be sealed with something..you should probably replace all vinyl floors to be s afe..
Its impossible to clean off, the best you can do is seal in the odor
now landlords dont like this because not only does it cost a fortune to do it right, but it takes TIME. so a home might be unavailable for rental for at least a extra month, while all this time consuming work is done:(
FIRE RESTORATION companies do this after home fires, it cost megabucks.
I was a landlord for awhile and put in the lease it was non smoking. fortun ately the tenant and their family didnt like smoke stink so it was never a issue
In the OPs case it might be best to rip down fancy cielings and replace wit h drywall if the cieling gets stinky
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