Workshop Ventilation

I was considering converting a 10x12' storage building into a woodworking shop, where I could do work such as stripping, sanding, refinishing, etc. on a regular basis. Things like insulating, wiring/lighting, etc. are not a problem as I'm familiar with that work, but I'm not sure what to do for ventilation. Obviously, when working with flammable and unhealthy vapours, sanding dust, etc, some kind of ventilation is needed. An open window is fine - except on a cold January night when the windchill can hit -40oC. What kind of ventilation options are available, without having to spend a small fortune, or end up risking frostbite during cold weather? Thanks for any advice.
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I do everything in my garage. When I'm staining or applying poly to wood, I don't worry about ventilation. The garage is big enough that I don't worry about issues with those products. When I'm painting a car it's another story. Those are some very nasty fumes - especially clear coat. For that, when the temps are moderate I use a 24" fan stuck under one of the garage doors and sealed around with plastic, to vent the garage to the outside. In not so moderate temps, I just spray and get the hell out until it's time for the next coat. Of course I use a respirator as well. The flamability issues are way over exagerated with normal woodworking products. The biggest issues with flamability is soiled rags and proper storage of them.
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Do you have some sort of enclosure to spray in? How do you keep overspray off the rest of the garage (and whatever is in it)?
Max
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I have a three bay garage Max. For small projects, I don't hang any drapes or any other type of protection against overspray. Typically, I won't generate enough to matter. I have even gone so far as to paint something as large as a truck fender on saw horses without hanging drapes. That will create some dusting on things, but it's really not as bad as you think it might be. For anything bigger than that I do drop plastic down from the ceiling that divides off the third bay from the first two. I work in the two bays created by the drape. This gives me a lot more room to move around and set up lights , etc. . I have a ton of light hanging in my celiling, but when you are spraying large vertical areas there is nothing that compares to direct lighting shining right straight on the vertical surface. Ceiling lights just don't cut it.
I often shoot with conventional siphon guns (not HVLP) so overspray can be an issue. That's why for the big jobs I drop the plastic. My plastic stays secured to the ceiling dividing the thrird bay from the other two and , and another sheet hangs along the back of the garage to protect my cupboards and stuff that normally sits along the back wall. I just roll/pleat it up when I'm not using it and hold it in place up near the ceiling with some 6" spring clamps. Easy to drop, and out of the way when not in use.
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"Mike Marlow" wrote

I was considering constructing some sort of enclosure using PVC pipe and 10 mil plastic sheeting but I hadn't thought of simply draping things. I believe that just might work for me too. Thanks,
Max
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I saw sometime ago a on the TV something call an air to air heat exchanger for this very purpose. It allows ventilation with out to much hest loss. but I can not remember were I saw it mentioned. you might try to google it.
len
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By the time you get equipment in there you're going ot have a hard time finishing the project (no slam intended). Your question is about venting so with the shop size in mind I would recommend what Mike said - for finishing wear a respirator with the disposable charcoal cannisters and get the heck out ASAP. For dust, use a respirator - not necessarily the type above since you don't want to waste the charcoal life on dust and perhaps a small fan, but the fan is going to exhaust your heat pretty quickly. Remember, when using a fan you have to open another window to allow air to flow in. Without another open window you are trying to pull a vacum and you get little flow. God luck and have fun!
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