Workbench Design (revised) w/SketchUp

Page 2 of 4  


WIth a good headwind, true.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

"Steve" wrote:

After a couple of rusty nails, all things are possible.<G>
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lew Hodgett wrote:

I had to look it up. An office complex--with a name like that, I thought it might be something more "romantic"...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
said:

Congratuations on your new SawStop! I'm not good for much more than 100 pounds, but I could help you just about anytime after May 1, if you haven't already got it installed by then. Just give the word.
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
said:

The wood doesn't even like it when it's that cold, and there's that much snow! Fortunately, we seem to be entering grass growing season again--40 degrees at night though.
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Let's see: straight bits, and ones that can be used for plunging, and roundover bits (for other projects). As I don't have a router nor any rounter bits at all, I am curious what other bits come to your mind as "simply indispensable for this kind of work".

Another "template/jig" job I was thinking of was to make some custom handles for my antique Stanley planes--once I get caught up, of course... Of course, why stop at just the handle... ; ) It's been a long time since I mentioned that my original goal was to build an 1840's milstrel-style banjo... but look where it got me.
http://www.minstrelbanjo.com/BANJOindex.html

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/18/2010 5:06 PM, Bill wrote:

For the template in that picture, showing one method of routing a curved pattern in the feet, you will need router bits you can use with templates/patterns.
With router bits, only buy one when you need it for a particular job and you will soon have an arsenal of bits that are useful for what you do, instead of buying in "sets" and ending up with a drawer full of router bits you never use.
Here's an example of a flush trim patter bits:
http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?pageT11 http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page 976
Try to get a couple of the longest you can find. You'll notice that one has the bearing close to the shank, one close to the end. Both will do the same job, but one will be handier for certain applications than the other.
If you do any work where you need to repeat curves and profiles in projects, get both, and buy the best you can afford. Cheap router bits will ruin a lot of expensive wood.
Amana is a good brand also, with some of the ones I have still going strong after more than a decade of use:
http://www.amanatool.com/routerbits.html
IMO, the 1/2" shank bits work the best with flush trim/pattern bits, with less chatter and a smoother cut.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/15/2010
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Swingman wrote:

Yes, I already decided to go that route (buying what I need, and avoiding cheap bits). I followed your links below and I was surprised to see a double bearing bit (don't think I've seen one before). I'm sure I could learn a thing or three more just browsing Amana's site. I read most of Bill Hylton's book ("Woodworking with the Router")a few years ago. Thank you for your suggestions!
Bill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

A double bearing bit has a number of advantages and is usually cheaper than two single bearing bits. As well as being able to remove the upper or lower bearing for a specific routing purpose, you can usually buy bearings of different diameters which lets the router bit cut different profiles.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Upscale wrote:

Wow, Some very-cool possibilities (that were not obvious, at least not to me). Thanks!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Swingman wrote:

Man, A lot o' bits.. Great diagrams! -Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm going to try cutting them by hand first (following what I can do drilling with a DP). Thanks for the heads up... I did some reading about mortisers tonight. "My name is Bill and I think I have a machine problem...." : )
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Bill" wrote:

--------------------------------------
Just another good reason to have a plunge router.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lew Hodgett wrote:

Hmmm...Thinking along those lines makes a plunge router seem even more essential, at least for most of my current needs, than a drill press.
Thank you, Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/18/2010 2:15 AM, Bill wrote:

It's a good-looking bench, and a well-done drawing!
I looked at your shop drawing, and suggest that you consider adding an under-bench shelf so you can set a tool aside without having it in your way on top of the bench or behind you on the saw top.
Some time back I took a shot (with SketchUp) to design a 2x4 and 2x6 bench (not anywhere near as elegant as yours) and incorporated a pair of shelves so I could keep tools and parts handy for the kinds of projects I like to do, and get a little more out of the area taken up by the bench:
http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Projects/LLJ/ (bottom of page)

It looks like a job for your bandsaw. :)
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 18 Apr 2010 03:15:15 -0400, the infamous "Bill"

Not bad! Suggestion: put a chrome cover on the top lip of that skirt board. Your foot will natually migrate up there and rest at times when you're at the bench.

Then find a copy of Aldren Watson's book _Hand Tools: Their Ways and Workings_ or _Glossary of Woodworking Terms_ by A.W. Lewis. Iffen you're feeling like a -real- newbie that day, get _The Complete Idiot's Guide to Woodworking_ by Reed Karen.

I used glued and pegged tenons in mine.

Roughsaw to the outline, file to suit, as it has always been done. Either bowsaur (my specialty ;) or hand saur.
Perfect excuse to buy a pair of Nicholsons, a #48 and a #49 cabinetmaker's rasps/files.
--
A book burrows into your life in a very profound way
because the experience of reading is not passive.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

-Read that one, it was pretty good.

I like that idea. In his bench, Garrett Hack uses those on his "intermediate rails" (on the short sides). He uses a steel rod in a groove on each of the long sides.

I already made that plunge (towards my plan of carving a banjo neck). I think if I shaped the feet by hand, that they would end up looking hand cut... I think I may try Swingman's template/jig suggestion for the feet. Thank you for your help!
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Of course, I developed my own jig to help accomplish the 4 inch radius arcs (since I lacked a router table) . Now I'm fretting over the ones underneath.
Bill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nice looking. One design consideration -- make sure you have enough room under the stretchers to be able to easily sweep out. You will probably end up with a shelf resting on those stretchers, and if the bottom is too low, it will be a PITA to clean under. DAMHIKT! Yours look to be high enough, but at least think about that and maybe mock something up before finalizing the design.

Wasting away wood to create this seems a shame. Why not just laminate a pad of the same wood as the trestle foot at all four ends, possibly routing a cove at the interior end before glue-up if you want that look.
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
alexy wrote:

Alexy,
I think you are right about the shelf, and you certainly have an fine out-of-the-box idea on an approach to get the sort of result I was after on the feet!
Thank you, Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.