Woodworking Goal

Page 2 of 3  


I work with my great-grandfather's tools - they are all hand tools that do not use electricity. I also have his forge and metalworking tools. I don't use the tools just to be different than, say, the people who shop at Lowe's. I genuinely enjoy working with human powered tools. When I use the tools I somehow feel connected to earlier generations of woodworkers and the escape from the busy everyday overworked modern life helps me keep balanced - it's like finding new meanings in old familiar poem. My goal is to keep enjoying using old tools, learning some more techniques, and making things.
Xopher
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just to enjoy what I'm doing. So far, I've succeeded. I like to improve my skills and try new methods. I make things either I want, my wife wants, or I can give to a friend that would appreciate the item. I'm careful to keep it a hobby, not a job as I already have a good job. I did accept payment for material on a bench I made for a friend but even that was after the fact.
Some day I'd like to build that museum quality piece. Woodworking has taught me patience (maybe age is a factor also) and the sense of accomplishment is very good also. If it stops being fun, it is time for a new hobby. Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
charlie b wrote:

To be able to afford what Tom Plamnn can buy?
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 03 Jun 2005 16:49:48 -0400, no(SPAM)vasys wrote:

To --sell-- to Tom Plamann for his personal use and for far more than he intended to pay.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

For me it is the exact same, however as much by hand as possible. No table saw, no elecric jointer or thicknesser. But I do have a mini band saw and a mini drill press, an electric hand Skil-drill, and a Makita palm sander and an old Rockwell 1/2 sheet sander.
"Minimal-izm" maybe... but I love the old ways of woodworking at heart. Chisels, hand planes, hand saws, surforms, rasps, braces and handcrank drills, clamps and a woodworkers bench, and so forth. The hardest part are the old molding planes (side beaders?) for doing the original work that electric routers replaced, such as knowing how to choose, use and sharpen them and making my own blades succesfully. I bought an old skew blade dado plane with a laminated blade, has no hardness and grinds down like chalk when sharpening. Rediculous.
--
Alex - newbie_neander in woodworking
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
what goal Im looking for in my woodworking is to be able to build peices of the quality and with the same skill that my great grandfather or his sons did or my dad who died when I was only a year old did they did it all with such care and attention to detail without a shop full of power tools we still have these tresures in our famly hand down through the years my granddaughter plays with a doll cradle built by mt greatgrand dad for my grand mothers sister I just hope some day that I can make them proud as they look down from above at my work
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sounds like a really great heritage, I hope it is also a part of your sole.
... I wish I had a heritage like that.
--
Alex - newbie_neander in woodworking
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Finishing a major project without getting my blood on it :-).
--
BNSF = Build Now, Seep Forever

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
charlie b wrote:

Now you know why I'm building a boat.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lew Hodgett wrote:

Lew,
When I first started reading this n.g. several years ago you were in the process of building your, iirc, "bullet proof boat." I take it from the tense of your above statement that that project is still 'in-process.' Wow, that gives me hope that some of my long-going projects might eventually be completed.
Regards, Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike wrote:

Building a boat is lot like wrasslin a bear.
As long as the bear wants to wrestle, you wrestle.
Building a boat, you are never done, but every day when you leave the boat yard, something is finished that wasn't finished when you got there.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 04 Jun 2005 03:37:29 GMT, Lew Hodgett

Reminds me of that Steinbeck novel "Tortilla Flat", where the guy was building the perfect boat on shore, and never got it sailing because he was afraid of the water... :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Building boats is quicker and _far_ cheaper than maintaining them once afloat.
Ask any boat owner. The amount it costs to look after it is more than they expected, in rough proportion to the reduction in the time they actually get to use it compared to expectations.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

recreational boat: hole in the water designed to pour money into. DAMHIK
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

For some, buying a boat is the two happiest days of their lives; the day they bought it and the day they sold it.
Gary
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I know everybody has already heard this, but . .
Definition of a boat . . . "A hole in the water, into which you pour money".
Daughter & SIL just bought a 26' cruiser w/Mercruiser V8 that has suddenly developed a bad case of "not gonna go". Can't get more than 2800RPM out of it. He'll eventually get, but it's supremely frustrating(and costly).
--
Nahmie
The greatest headaches are those we cause ourselves.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

To make furniture, cabinets, and built-ins that look exactly like I expect them to, to my quality standards, in a reasonable amount of time, to the satisfaction of the person requesting the work.
I also would like to have the experience and ability to use whatever tool the task requires, hand, power, stationary, you name it.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You're right. Tom Plamann has made furniture I cannot afford to buy.
Patriarch
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It started out as sawdust therapy. One place where I could not be reached by cell phone, because I could turn it off without guilt for safety reasons.
And to have something, anything, tangible, to show for the planning, learning, struggle and fight that was my life at the time. I've at least temporarily cured the career induced problems.
My wife & I are discussing telling the corporate world that it can do without us, that with our children raised and their educations paid for, and our parents at least fairly well settled into their later years, that it's time to do the artsy, studio-types of things we postponed 30+ years ago in order to have a home and responsibly raise a family. The business plan is taking shape, I'm getting sufficient confidence in a focused area of endeavor, and have put together some network of resources to show, market and install the types of things I can economically make in a semi-customised manner.
And then I'll still do a few exploratory pieces, just for my own enjoyment.
But it's nice to have recovered at least some of my former good nature.
Patriarch, who owes most of it to sawdust...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

When I hit 50, I took aim at winding down my workaholic lifestyle. Workshop and workers to the left, customers and the regulation (tax, safety, workman's comp, insurance, bankers, accountants, suppliers and weasels) to the right...and Rob in the middle. A continuous act of putting out fires, starting new ones and always running into-and setting deadlines. I hadn't turned on a piece of equipment on in a few years. That corporate treadmill already cost me two marriages and I was burnt out and freshly divorced. I had it up to here with the bullshit. Sad part was... nobody to blame. I couldn't even take a vacation without my cell/satellite/internet connections. Even a 10,000 mile trip in 1999 to Australia wasn't far enough from the rat-race.
But it was on the way back from the Great Ocean Road through the Otways rain-forest in a pub in the town of Forest, that I had a few pints with a few locals that it sank in. I actually caught myself relaxing... what the hell.. my plane wasn't leaving for another 2 weeks... When I came back to Canada, I set the wheels in motion to liquidate my assets to start all over. I had to cut clean. Sept 2003 I went out the laneway from the shop and retired.... well... semiretired. My new lady-friend at the time made the effort to show me around her province, The Cabot Trail, seafood, beer and people similar to those I met in Oz. Laid back. Many people come by it naturally. I had to acquire the skill of being laid back. Piddling around in my garage/workshop (then empty) allowed me to think. I LIKED working with my hands, using my head. I could whip up a solid surface countertop in my sleep... the money is good.. so I decided to fund the growth of a woodworking shop entirely from the proceeds of my solid surface sales. So far so good. 30 years of millwork experience on all levels has left me with enough experience not to do foolish things. I do continue to slap myself when I ohh-and-ahhhed at that General 24"(?) Heavy Duty Industrial planer with the serrated feedrollers that David Eisen at Federated Tools showed me a few days ago...
Perspective and therapy.... and a project plan. What to build first? I'm working on a new cherry headboard, then what? Was thinking about Harley Davidson rocking horses..there are no plans I like, so I'm drawing away.. I could easily make a 100 of those and make some money *SLAP*
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.