Wood measurements


I bought some 3/4" plywood fir for a shelf in my cabinet. I was looking for something to high the end bands. The store had lost of pine that looked abuot right but it was 1/2". So I kept going in circles between isles trying to find the 3/4" pine to put on the end of this plywood. After about an hour I decided to just grap the piece that looked right.
Turns out the 1/2" solid wood is the same thickness as the 3/4" plywood. This wouldn't be the first odd measurement I have found like 3/4 is really 5/8... What am I missing here?
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Thank you,



"Then said I, Wisdom [is] better than strength: nevertheless the poor
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It sounds to me like the 1/2" wood was mislabeled.
If you're looking for a piece of wood 3/4" thick, you should be buying 1" stock (sometimes called 4/4). They plane off exactly 1/4", leaving you with 3/4".
Josh
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Josh may be right about the mislabel. But ply's funny like that. Depending on where it's from (You never said where you purchased it, but it sounded like the borg), 3/4 is more like 23/32nds, 1/2 is around 15/32nds (or 12 mm, now I'm getting confused). Bring a tape measure in with you the next time. You'll be surprised at the variables, even from sheet to sheet, sometimes. Tom
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Josh wrote:

Maybe that was it. I bought 1" wood and it matched the 3/4 plywood. Just dont know why it was labelled like that. I got it mostly at lowes.
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Thank you,



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wrote:

That's because wood is sold by its nominal dimensions, i.e. the dimensions before drying and surface-planing. If you buy 1-inch (four-quarter) rough-sawn lumber, you'll get lumber that is actually one inch thick, or pretty close to it. But when you're buying lumber that's already been surface-planed, nominal one-inch lumber has been planed down to a thickness of 3/4". The actual dimensions of a one-by-two are 3/4 by 1-1/2, a two-by-four is 1-1/2 by 3-1/2, and so on.
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wrote:

It is helpful to carry a measuring tape when shopping for lumber. Don't believe the tag.
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It is also useful to carry calipers in your pocket. This will give you a more accurate measurement of thickness.
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Order edge banding from Woodworkers Supply, etc. Sand the edges nicely and iron it on. It stands up surprisingly well and is easy to repair. Bugs
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Lee Michaels wrote:

I'll add: carry your FRACTIONAL calipers to the store. It's kinda a PITA to convert .237 to 32nds while shopping. :)
Dave
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