wood filler

Have some very small gaps in joined wood I would like to fill. (Yeah I know I need a new joiner) What should I use for a filler? Wood is walnut and the finish will be tung oil ( no Stain) Looked at Behlen wood-fil ( water base)and it seems to be the right choice. If I'm right where can I get some. Catalogs and Woodcrafter don't mention it. Is there an alternative brand and should I use water or solvent base? Thanks in advance Lee
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The walnut filler that comes in little tubes at HD is a pretty good match; elmers I think. Most fillers are acts of desperation, but walnut works well.
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My desperation has a name...1972 6" Simpson Sears jointer
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No matter what you use, there will be a noticeable portion, with an oil finish.
That said, Rockler's has a water-based filler that sorta works for small stuff, like the holes where the 18ga brad went through the wood. Try it with scrap first, whatever you use, all the way to the end of your finishing program, to see if you like it. This stuff is cheap, compared to screwing up your whole project.
Patriarch
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Tue, Feb 6, 2007, 4:05am (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@tds.net (Lee) doth woefully queryeth: <snip> What should I use for a filler? <snip>
Whatever you want.
You could try a bit of shellac, mixed with sanding dust from the piece you're working on.
JOAT Only those who have the patience to do simple things perfectly will acquire the skill to do difficult things easily. - Johann Von Schiller
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Lee wrote:

G'day Lee, I have good results with wax sticks. Usually I put on one coat of finish, then use the wax stick. I cut very small amounts of the end with a putty knife and force it into the gap(Hole)then scape of any excess with the knife. A quick going over with a green scotch pad and it disappears with the second and subsequent finish coats.
Good luck regards John
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Lee - I've had great luck with 5 minute epoxy on walnut and oak. Ends up looking fairly natural and seems to take a poly somewhat so probably will take the tung oil as well. two coats is enough, then sand - works REALLY well with big defects. (try a on test piece and see if it gives you the look your after)
Good luck - Schroeder

know
choice.
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Schroeder wrote:

Same here.
I'll often tint it with black artist's oil paint.
I don't fully understand why, but black filler ends up looking way more natural than other colors I've tried.
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