Will heat loosen veneer?


I have an old cedar chest that a friend asked me to look at for her. Years ago, someone in her family decided they didn't like the cedar, so they put walnut veneer over it all. Sometime after that, someone else decided they didn't like walnut, so they antiqued it ( ugly white paint ). Now, some of the veneer is coming loose, and she's asked me to see what I can do with it. I'd like to get it down to the original cedar, and put a nice finish on it, but am not sure how to get the rest of the veneer off.
Some of it has already been pulled off, but some of it is stuck pretty good. I was wondering if some heat and a putty knife, gently used, would loosen up the rest of veneer.
I don't know how old the glue is, or what kind was used - neither does she. Any pointers would be appreciated.
TIA, Tim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've had good luck with heat loosening any number of glue applications. It's sure worth a try, and I think likely to succeed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Heat gun, heat an already broken area, see what it feels like. Doesn't sound like rocket science, really. Trial and error's about all you got with no data like your case.
Pop

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
PopS wrote:

Yes, or possibly also an iron.
Keep in mind that the heat may produce some toxic fumes too.
Lead Oxide, common in old paints, readily volotolizes and can then contaminate whatever is nearby, like you.
--

FF


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Heating the veneer, but not hot, hot, will soften the glue, allowing you to peal it off. You may not need the putty knife as much as you think. Using a clothes iron will work also, but place a cloth over the veneer when using an iron.
If you ever have a piece of furniture where the veneer has buckled up, or bubbled up, heat the area (softening the glue), clamp the veneer back down and allow the glue to dry again, hence veneer repair. A slow heating (any heat source) is recommended, and pay attention to your finish. Too much heat may affect the finish. As long as there is glue still under the veneer, this repair will work, otherwise, injecting a tad more glue into the cavity will need to be done.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.