Why no MDO at HD?

Page 2 of 3  
Heathkits were loads of fun! My Dad and I built a color tv kit when I was in High School. The first color set he owned. Tv, cabinet and stand ran about $550 if I recall correctly. BIG bucks in '66. And that was without a remote control. Being the eldest, I was always the "remote". Before we got an antenna on the roof, I was also the "antenna" on nights when the rabbit ears were acting up. Watched many "Ed Sullivan" shows with one hand holding onto one rabbit ear and the moving the other arm, "just a little higher...there... RIGHT there" and hanging my head around the front of the old Zenith b/w to _try_ and watch the show. That Heath color set had 25-30 tubes in it. Couple times a year, Dad and I would pull them all and run over to the Rexall drug or wherever (no Radio Shack in area until '69) and test them all out. 6GH8s and 6L6 tubes were the ones that seemed most likely to need replacing. $10-15 bucks for a handful of new tubes & I had to listen to Dad grumble about the short life & high price of tubes, _all_ the way home. Those of you on the plus side of 50 have been there too.
When I moved out, my sister was promoted to "remote control". Did not work as well as I, WAY to much sass and "Why me?" She fled to college and my little brother got the job. Dad did not get a REAL tv with a REAL remote until my brother went off to college. Mother _would not_ get up to change channels, lower volume or adjust the color/tint. I think the Heathkit color set was moved to his den and a big new Zenith _w/remote_ was up and running in the living room before my brother was even half settled in his dorm.
When we first married, wife and I bought a Heathkit color set. ($360) Went together fine but did not work right. Using their great troubleshooting handbook we narrowed it down to trouble in the yoke. Calling Heathkit, (fantastic C/S department) a tech had us do a couple tests not in the book and confirmed that, indeed, the yoke itself was defective. New on arrived in 3 days via US Mail, at Xmas time. (UPS not yet a player) New yoke worked great and we used that set for +20 years.
Built other Heathkits over the years. Gave wife and Dad both digital display clock kits for Xmas one year. Hers worked fine when she put it together. Dad's never did work right. He swapped a couple parts in assembly and fried the main chip. He never did live that down. As it was Dad who always said, "you only need to be able to do two things to build a Heathkit, read _and_ follow directions."
Heathkits were, in part, responsible for my career path. 11 years retail electronics sales/mgmt (yes Robert, at Radio Shack, 375 stores when I started & +11,000 when I left), 16 years broadcast engr and 7 yrs in cellular coverage/field engineering.
Getting back on topic, the Heath stereo receiver I built in HS, had a beautiful pecan case. It stood up to years of use and many, many moves. Also, Heath tried getting into prepackaged woodworking kits not to long before they went belly up. But was too little, too late.
Ahh, the good old days!! (3 TV channels in most areas, 4 if you had PBS!)
DexAZ

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Heathkit H8 .... built one around 1968 or so while I was in the service. Saved up to buy one peripheral at a time on a 2nd LT's pay while I waited on orders to RVN.
T'was the beginning of the end ...
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 9/21/03
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I am the right age to remember Uncle Sam would buy you a Heathkit TV if you signed up for an electronics course that the GI bill recognized. We all built one (GR-25?) Something like that.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DexAZ wrote:

Just for the record, I'm an early 30-something (31? 32? I forget...) and I've been there. We had a lot of hand-me-down stuff. Our first color TV was this gigantic cabinet deal with a record player, a radio and a TV. Gigantic ultrasonic remote control with two buttons on it. Jingle your keys just right, and it would change channels...
We used to get replacement tubes at People's drug store. When they stopped selling tubes, we finally caved in and bought a new TV.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mttt wrote:

That brings back memories in of itself too. I can't remember the last time a battery leaked. Do they not leak anymore? I've got batteries in stuff I know have been in there for at least six years.
Those Heathkits were fun too. I built a bunch of that stuff with Dad. I learned some fun lessons, like what happens when you solder in an electrolytic cap backwards... :)
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Silvan wrote:

LOL! I put together a Griefkit H-52 (IIRC) terminal back when 300 BAUD was the norm, 110 acceptable, 1200 unbelievable, and 9600 godlike. I found out what happens when a flyback goes south. ;-)
-- Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mark Jerde wrote:

Heh, me too! That was the project with the blown cap, actually. It was hooked up to a screaming 300-baud acoustic coupler modem.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 11 Oct 2003 11:40:46 -0400, Silvan

I think you guys are talking about the H19 dumb terminal kit. I built one of these things during the weekend I moved into a dorm in the fall of 1978 or so. I'll never forget the look on my new roommate's face (randomly assigned, we had never met) when he saw me with soldering iron in hand and parts all over the place when he opened the door! I fired the thing up that evening and it worked the first time. I think thats the only time that ever happened in my entire life! I was up and hacking away at the university's PDP11 RSTS machine (using my 300 baud acoustic coupler) that evening. Hard to believe how much fun that was, considering how primitive it was compared to what we have today.
Tim Carver
Tim Carver snipped-for-privacy@twocarvers.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net says...

Oh yeah, they still leak. I've had several do so in the past several years. Now, the environment was somewhat severe, hot garage, Tucson, AZ.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 11 Oct 2003 02:57:10 +0000, Mark & Juanita wrote:

Oh, yeah. Not any different here in Casa Grande. I keep telling myself I gotta make a list of all battery powered devices and change 'em every year and get on a same date routine - should only take about 2 hours ;-)
Car batteries can make it on average about 2 years in the desert - even the Searz Heat Beaters.
-Doug
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

Yep, I've started changing my car batteries every 24 months whether they need it or not. The last battery I had go bad in my pick-up took out my dashboard to the tune of $300. The cost of the repair would have been more, but because the pickup was less than 3 years old, the Ford dealer worked a deal with the manufacturer such that if I had some standard routine maintenance done (transmission fluid change), I got a reasonable deal on the new dashboard.
The damage was either caused when the battery died, or because internal damage to the battery caused excessive current somewhere when attempting to jump start the vehicle after the battery failed. I decided at that point, changing batteries every couple years was definitely cheaper than taking a chance on that kind of damage being done in the future.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have a volt/ohm meter that I bought in 1979 and it still works fine with the original 9 volt battery. I'd be scared to check the battery..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You've hit my button. I find that no store irritates me more than Radio Schack. Your message explains the whole problem. Clerks hired *because* they're stupid. It isn't happenstance, it's corporate policy.......
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lazarus Long wrote:

I just can't even stand to go in that place anymore. As soon as you walk through the door, you're swamped with drooling sales drones who don't know a capacitor from an amphitheater. Go in to buy a couple of diodes, and they try to sell you a cellular phone. Get ready to check out, and the sales drones are suddenly too busy talking on the phone to ring you up.
Last time I was in there, I had to spend an hour buying one bottle of ferric chloride, and there were three employees and two customers in the store.
Ripoff Shark makes Home Despot's people look comptent. The rocket scientist in question at least realized that 4x8 referred to some type of wood product.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Silvan wrote:

It's better now after the .com crash, but it's still unusual for me to go into any computer store and find folks who know more than I do. Durn few of them know any PDP-11 assembler, or have written TSR keyboard extenders in DOS, or have struggled trying to create an installer with MDAC that doesn't break any of Win95, 95B, 98, 98SR2, NT, ...
"I dunno. Let's check their website..."
Duh!
-- Mark ;-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@verizon.no.spam.net says...

of the best instruction sets around - bested only by the GE4xx series.
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Larry Blanchard wrote:

A little before my time. ;-) I know a lady about 10 years older who keeps her checkbook in hex. ;-)
-- Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Larry
When you say GE4XXX series do you mean like the GE4010? I worked on that when I first got out of college. We did the front panel single stepping and BRU to self...remember that?
Al Morgan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@usa.com says...

Was that the process control system? I never worked on it. I was referring to the 415/425/435 series. That lead to the 625, which led to Multics, which led to Unix :-).
BTW, I also have the original IDS manual for the 625, the first (despite IBM's claims) data base management system.
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Anybody that smart can probably get a "real" job.
Wife worked at HD for a while. They made a point of hiring trades people. Most of them were pretty good. Trouble was, with the pay and working conditions, most of them didn't stick around. This was a brand new store when my wife started there. Now its not so new, in more ways than one.
Allen
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.