When to apply a highly polished finish?

In my recent limited readings, (I still need to get Flexner) I have noticed that authors always demonstrate high polish finishes (i.e. french polishing) on the tabletop itself and never mention the rest of the piece (as in the legs and aprons, in the case of a table). Is it typical to apply the same technique to those areas, or just to the top since that is the focal point, and something less labor intensive to the rest of the piece? If, in fact you apply a different technique to the legs and aprons, what is typically done?
Steve P.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What the builder prefers. I don't care to polish out the beneaths, you may.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 6 Aug 2004 08:35:42 -0400, "Steven P"

No, it's typical to apply the same _materials_, but often the _technique_ is a less labour-intensive variant.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@patriot.nospam.net says...

My votes with the no you don't kill yourself with other then the large flat obvious portions of the piece. That doesn't mean you short change the rest but you don't go the whole rubbing out routine. Sometimes you may actually have to tone it down hair with some 0000 steel wool because the high surface shine can conflict with the deeper rubbed out sheen.
--
MikeG
Heirloom Woods
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
So, if I have applied 4 coats of varnish and sanded and polished the top, then to the rest, I should apply 4 coats of varnish and rub to an acceptable sheen.
Steve P.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"So, if I have applied 4 coats of varnish and sanded and polished the top, then to the rest, I should apply 4 coats of varnish and rub to an acceptable sheen."
not in my book. The underside would get finished to nice sheen...that may take two coats and then steel wood and wax. The top I would treat separetly. I may do the 4 coats and sand and buff out but then that is cured, I would start the entire buffing out process. I happen to use the 4 step Menzerna system along with the Festool Rotex sanding/polisher. This page may help: http://www.woodshopdemos.com/trays-13.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@patriot.nospam.net says...

Hi Steve
No, not necessarily. You just don't want a dramatic difference between the highly polished top and the rest of the piece. That would be too noticeable.
What you would probably want to do is NOT put on four coats just one or two good coats on the lower unit. Then do what is necessary to have it not glaringly contrast with the top. Sometimes it rubbing it sometimes it is hitting it lightly with some 0000 steel wool.
There is no hard fast rule. All you can do is get your finish perfect on the top and then get enough finish on the lower part so that it is protected and, with the top on, looks pleasing to the eye.
That last part is the trick. When the piece is assembled you want people to look at it and SEE the top and just have the bottom fade into the background, not have the eye drawn too it, either because the finish is too poor or too glossy, rather then the top.
I know that is a bit fuzzy but I hope that makes some sense.
--
MikeG
Heirloom Woods
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Actually it does, and is a big help. Now I just need to start a table project.
Thanks to one and all for taking the time to answer.
Steve P.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Seems to me there are logical reasons for paying additional attention to the surfaces that receive the most wear and need additional finish and areas which "show" the piece off. The former is basically a pure functional consideration, the latter an asthetic one . Generally both of these premises have to be met, a piece that does not stand up normal wear and tear is a failure as is a piece with a crappy finish.
Getting a good looking finish on a piece in the area where it is most apparent usually involves more coats more elbow grease and more finish, which in most cases covers the durability aspects. Areas that are not so attention getting do not generally need the same finishing attention [assuming we are not discussing valuable antiques and the like] because they do not get the same wear and secondly the light strikes them at different angles making finishing flaws etc less apparent.....mjh
--


http://members.tripod.com/mikehide2
"Steven P" < snipped-for-privacy@patriot.nospam.net> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.