When Norm and Roy shake hands

Catchy Title huh? or maybe not anyway this is a review of my present exploit (project). The project is an attempt to build a larger food cupboard for an elderly lady. She wanted to replace the ugly white metal cupboard. So I sat down and drew up some plans first on paper (very general) for the benefits of dimensions, then transferred that to TurboCad Learning edition. After getting an opinion from a couple of guys online I set about finding wood. Since it was supposed to be white I figured I would go with #2c Tulip Poplar. Ha, after looking around I settled on Wall Lumber for only 1.08 a BF. right. Lesson 1. If the price of lumber doesn't give you a heart attack then the price of shipping will.
So I found a classified add for Lumber, $1 a BF. Went with the Butternut, and Hickory for the shelving. (don't worry, they will not be painted) Lesson 2. Classified adds = good deals
I have never actually worked with either type of wood but had very little problem. Hickory is open grained. Machines well despite its density. It looks like a cross between ash and oak. Chips rough in the planner, instead of fine dust or chips. Has a tendency to come out stringy when I tried to join it on my router table. A side warning about breathing the dust. Even the dust is rough in texture. Butternut looks like white walnut (thus its other name). It does smell better, and is more forgiving, not prone to chip outs when subjected to the router. Lesson 3. Don't be afraid of trying new woods.
Originally I was going to lock-Miter the corners. Yeah right. My 2HP Craftsman router couldn't take the stress of running the bit. However I did come upon a great bit for making finger joints, T&G etc. by changing around cutter parts and shims. Now I am going for just a lock joint. Lesson 4. No matter how much you plan, you will always change them.
My joining technique took a hit this week. Had no problem joining my last project but this time I can't get a straight edge so I can glue up boards. So I brought out my trusty, simple, block plane (the only one I own) and put it through its paces, suddenly I was a Neander! The plane hadn't seen more than maybe 1 hr. total use its entire lifetime. Lesson 5. Your hand plane is your best friend, keep it sharp.
Keeping a picture diary of daily work. Lesson 6 Digital Cameras are a must have for every woodworker. I'll post a pic on ABPW when the project begins to look like more than a bunch of sticks and boards.
--
Young Carpenter

"Violin playing and Woodworking are similar, it takes plenty of money,
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Have you tried dampening just prior to planing as is suggested for curly maple? Might be worth a try.
On Sun, 7 Sep 2003 14:19:38 -0400, "Young Carpenter"
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Nice write-up, looking forward to seeing your pics.
Don't know if the "ugly white metal cupboard" is porcelain coated metal or not but if it is - that cabinet could be an antique piece. If it's just a standard metal cabinet like you see used for office supplies then it'll make a good paint storage cabinet for you - assuming you're also tasked with getting rid of the other. Post a picture and ask before you deep six it though - just in case.
Bob S.
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