Wheel Chair Ramp

Help! Need plans for a wheel chair ramp for house front door. One that is temporary perhaps or one I can adap as temporary. And any insights from anyone.
Thanks to all.......
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I don't know exactly what is *required* for ADA or OSHA, but IIRC, then the ramp has to be at least 36" wide, more is better and I think a 1:12 pitch. If you have an outward opening door at an entry, the landing must be at least 36" (again, prolly more) beyond the arc of the door swing. If your front door is above grade level by any significant amount, you'll need to make a return so that you don't have 40 freekin' feet of ramp in your yard. Also think about a secondary means of entry/egress in the event of an emergency.
If you need this to be to code, check w/your building dept or perhaps get a referral through a senior center or hospice. That, or go find a place that has ramps and take yr tape measure for some rules of thumb.
I took care of my folks, both in 'chairs, for years... so I know it can be a drag for all concerned. I hope this helps and am glad to hear that your situation is temporary.....
John Moorhead Lakeport, CA

is
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Not Telling wrote:

For a bunch of useful information including plans for a modular ramp see: http://www.wheelchairramp.org /
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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See http://www.dallasramps.org/HowTo/HowTo.htm
Pitch of 1/12, if the length exceeds 20', probably want to include some level sections 4' in length to rest. Turns and switchbacks are usually level as well. We use all PT material, 2x6 frames, 2x4 rails and curbs, 3/4" ply deck, 4x4 for legs.

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This one looks great for country where it doesn't snow. Snow needs drainage.
I'd like to suggest two design criteria and a suggestion based on my own specialty.
1) Switchbacks need extra room, not just a right angle. The ambulance cot has a footprint of about (not at work, can't say precisely) 42x16 inches. The diagonal of about 60 inches has to make it around the corner. Make a generous landing.
2) If room will not permit a generous landing, keep the outside rail low so the head end of the cot can clear it.
And/Or keep a second straight ahead non-handicapped entrance clear inside and shoveled outside for your ambulance crew.

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Here's a link where they built on one of HGTV's shows. http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/ah_personal_care_safety/article/0%2C%2CHGTV_3149_1397397%2C00.html
--
Mike S.
snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net
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Longer is generally better. If you have space enough for a 1:16 or 1:20 slope, go for it. Much easier to push or roll up a 1:20 than a 1: 12 slope. My in-laws had one built by the neighborhood handyman. Its a joke! Might be 1:8 maybe 1:10 at best. Was ok, but just, when Father-in-law was on crutches. Now that he is in a wheel chair, he cannot roll himself up as it is too steep. I have a tough time pushing him myself. They won't let us rebuild it as their "handyman" said it was the just fine when he built it in 94. Mother-in-law says, "and _he_ should know!" (that's right, he _should_ have but he sure didn't)
Make it as long as you can.
DexAZ

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Current ada guidelines are: a 'ramp' is between 5.00-8.33% slope. With every 30" of rise, one should have a 5 foot landing (flat, or with a slight pitch of 1% if drainage is an issue, but you get the idea). If you have switchbacks, it's a good idea to have those areas flat as well, and sufficiently roomy to allow for maneuvering. Hope thise helps--
Dave

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every
pitch
Give the slope in inches fall per foot, as many of the carpenters have no idea of how to figure % slope.
--
Jim in NC



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ADA requires 1" in 12". Every 20 feet requires a 4' resting spot. All turns require a 5' turning circle. ADA requires a 1 1/2" handrail that is 1 1/2" out from the mounting surface. ADA requires a "curb" to prevent a chair from going off the edge.
UBC (Uniform Building Code) requires handrails if the slope exceeds 1" in 20". If you can fall more than 30" UBC requires 42" fall protection. It may also require "non climbable" closure that can pass the 4" ball rule (a 4" ball cannot pass through any opening). The exception here is a 6" ball at the apex of the riser/tread intersection.
We live in interesting times for builders and carpenters. How did so many of us survive into our fifties?
#################### Keep the whole world singing. . . Dan G (remove the 7)

With
slight
no
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The curb is _very_ improtant if there is no railing.
Another consideration if there is no space for a ramp is an electric wheelchair lift. A few years back they were about $5,000 (I think). What I recall for sure is that the lift was only a little more expensive than the ramp proposed by the contractor which woudl have occupied half the garage, blocked access to cabinets, and still would have been too steep and had insufficient space ont he switchbacks to be safe.
It is important to keep in mind that what is adequate for now might not be adequate in a few years as the patient comes to need more equipment or as the caregiver ages.
--

FF

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Must also have handrails no wider than 1-1/2", Check with ADA. They ARE the source of all this. American Disabilities Act.
On Sat, 1 Nov 2003 10:54:53 -0500, "Morgans"

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http://myweb.cableone.net/andya/00porchramp.jpg
Here's a ramp we built from one sheet of 3/4" CDX, some 2x2's and 2x4's. The ramp is 8' long and rises 14". Too steep for unassisted wheel chair use, but fine if somebody pushes up and braces down. The ramp is portable and when we're finished with it we intent to donate to a local charity.
The ramp was primed and painted with leftover housepaint, the deck has sand mixed into the paint for traction. Even wet or snow covered it isn't slippery. Haven't seen any significant ice form because the water sheds pretty well.
If you want I could upend the beast and send a picture of the underside structure, which is simple.
Andy

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