What to look for in a drawknife - curved vs. flat


I would like to purchase a drawknife and, not really having used one before, I'm not sure what to look for.
My indented use will include rounding out riven pins for a timber frame project and forming chair parts. Who knows what else.
These guys have a pretty broad selection:
http://www.traditionalwoodworker.com/default.php/cPath/36_104?osCsid cbe527043f0c8da3d2e2d220e06a3b
I'm hoping to find some experienced guidance.
The flat-bladed models like this:
http://www.traditionalwoodworker.com/product_info.php/cPath/36_104/products_id/253
Appears considerably easier to sharpen, is there a downside?
How about width? it seems to me that the blades are way more wide than actually necessary .... I would think tool width (not the actual edge with would be more important for ergonomics.
Any pointers welcomed.
Thanks,
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://www.traditionalwoodworker.com/default.php/cPath/36_104?osCsid cbe527043f0c8da3d2e2d220e06a3b
http://www.traditionalwoodworker.com/product_info.php/cPath/36_104/products_id/253
The first is great as a push knife for decoy work or where you can't get a good enough grip to "draw" the knife toward you. I have one, seldom use it. Rather whittle.
For pegs you won't need a long knife. The carvers' is nice, I have one from Lee Valley, but for chair legs you'll appreciate the length as you start at one corner and skew and draw it. Moves the wood out easier. Also why I like the bellied types better than the straight. On short draws the belly is the skew that makes the shaving curl. The two cherries 9" would be my choice. I like the handle angle. My big knife has handles almost perpendicular to the blade, and can be fatiguing.
Build a Bodgers' bench so you have a good clamp. Then get a LV low angle spokeshave or two. Safe, almost as fast, and incredibly long-lived edge.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

it.
Also
Thanks George. That precisely the type of feedback I was looking for.

It's already on my summer project list. I have a neighbor who is raizing a barn in the next few weeks. I'm going to try to scam as much recycled timber as possible. I intend to use "bits of barn for the bodger bench"

I have the LV rosewood handled spokeshaves.... it was a very nice gift.
Last night I was puttering, trying to transform a modest white oak limb from a yard trimming into a 40" timber framers "persuader" mallet handle. I roughed it out with the bandsaw, then followed with the spokeshaves. I found that the shaves were the wrong tool for the job as they were unable to remove much stock because of the limitted mouth opening (1/32" at best).
I assumed that a drawknife is really the right tool for that job, and I should save the spoke shave for the more delicate work. Or does the LV LA spokeshave have a bigger mouth to accomodate rough work.
-Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The aluminum body one can be adjusted to what you want. With the thick blade and the up bevel, you can do some prodigious hogging with it, even on green wood. I know I do.
Use your fancy for delicate, or reset the blade in the aluminum body for fine work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.