what saw do you use in this situation


Greetings. My Mother n law feels she needs 4 inches or so cut off the end of her counter top so she can add something, (movable cart or some such thing.) There is approximately a 4 inch overhand from the lower cuboard. OK no brainer cut off the 4 inches flush. Problem#1 I used a jigsaw to cut as far back as I can .. bonk.. the plate(FOOT OF THE SAW) hits the backsplash, leaving about 1 1/2 inches to the end. I started another cut 90 degrees on the end.. still not close enough. Problem #2 the backsplash.. without really messing up the wall how do I cut thru that.
-- "Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted." -Albert Einstein
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Hiya

I go real slow with a Sawzall and a metal blade. I free hand it with slow speed and great care. Do NOT let the blade pullback out of the kerf...which means you're going into the wall a little bit.
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wrote:

See if you can slip a piece of thin sheet metal between the back of the counter and the wall, to protect the wall from the fine-toothed crosscut handsaw that you will use to finish out the cut.
HTH
Tom Watson - WoodDorker
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I picked up one of these a couple of months ago. Sure has come in handy for getting nice cuts in tight spaces. Has almost replaced my flush cut hand saw. Check it out, may be just what you need- (Amazon.com product link shortened)36345346/ref=cl_tr_br_cl/104-7135650-8573525?n"8264&s=hi&v=glance --dave

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On Wed, 04 Jan 2006 03:31:45 GMT, with neither quill nor qualm, "Dave

I got their 9-1/2" version for $26 delivered via the FWW ad. It'll cut a tubafore in half more quicly than a freshly sharpened Disston and only use about 1/3 the effort in doing so! They're simply amazing. http://thejapanwoodworker.com/product.asp?s=JapanWoodworker&pf_id .610.0&dept_id088 I want the hardwood version next. http://thejapanwoodworker.com/product.asp?s=JapanWoodworker&pf_id .611.0&dept_id088
This is by far the best saw I've ever owned, and it's one of the cheaper varieties that they sell at <$30. Pro models are up to $90. I love the ryoba shape, and the handle can be offset either way to get into tight spots.
Regarding cutting the countertop splash, perhaps he can also cut it from the inside of the cupboard below.
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quickly quoth: : : >I picked up one of these a couple of months ago. Sure has come in handy for : >getting nice cuts in tight spaces. Has almost replaced my flush cut hand : >saw. Check it out, may be just what you need- : >(Amazon.com product link shortened)36345346/ref=cl_tr_br_cl/104-7135650-8573525?n"8264&s=hi&v=glance : > --dave : : I got their 9-1/2" version for $26 delivered via the FWW ad. It'll cut : a tubafore in half more quicly than a freshly sharpened Disston and : only use about 1/3 the effort in doing so! They're simply amazing. : http://thejapanwoodworker.com/product.asp?s=JapanWoodworker&pf_id .610.0&dept_id088 : I want the hardwood version next. : http://thejapanwoodworker.com/product.asp?s=JapanWoodworker&pf_id .611.0&dept_id088 : : This is by far the best saw I've ever owned, and it's one of the : cheaper varieties that they sell at <$30. Pro models are up to $90. : I love the ryoba shape, and the handle can be offset either way to : get into tight spots. : : Regarding cutting the countertop splash, perhaps he can also cut it : from the inside of the cupboard below.
There's no name on it, but I've got one that's just great, and very old to boot. The teeth on one side cut on the pull, the other side cuts on the push, and it's curved slightly - you can get an almost perfect cut right up flush with it. You can't beat the tooth design on yours though; got a backsaw like that and it's great.
With patience, these would work for that countertop but I think I'd just find a flush-cut jigsaw blade or get out my sawzall with a short flush-cut blade. It'd depend on how much the surrounding damage mattered. Sometimes tilting the front of the jigsaw up to get most of the undercut done and then a hacksaw blade in a vice grip or something to finish the last of the cut works too.
Pop
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(Amazon.com product link shortened)36346712/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/102-6675850-8830501?%5Fencoding=UTF8&v=glance&n"8013

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works...
Sticking to what I actually own, I would try a cutting disk on an angle grinder or a Fein with a saw on it.
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Jack_O wrote:

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Jack_O wrote:

Go to Home Depot or Lowes and rent a countertop cutoff tool. Get the one with a backsplash attachment. Rental is about $3.00 per day with a $10 deposit. Just plug it in, position it on the counter where you want it cut and hit the button. It's a wonderous tool and cuts it perfectly every time. But it has to be a fresh cut. If you've already started the cut with a jigsaw or something it won't work.
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Come on guys - I cant believe no one has suggested to remove the countertop yet. They aren't that hard to remove and re-install. Harder, a bit, if there is a sink but still not too difficult. Just find out where its screwed to the cabinets and also look for glue or caulk. Cut the glue or caulk with a putty knife.

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I'd try a pullsaw.

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