What is it? Set CCXXVII

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    Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
1269)    No idea on this one. Perhaps the holes at a given level     are for marking off a specific number of divisions per inch.
1270)    Some sort of load binder -- a strap threads through and around     the smooth pulley. The serrated one swings in to lock it in     position along the strap.
1271)    No clue -- and not even a guess on this one.
1272)    A hammer blow to the back marks the path of two grooves     at right angles in wood prior to the grooves being cut     by a chisel.
1273)    Some kind of whistle -- perhaps to indicate overpressure in     a steam engine?
1274)    A dosimeter -- to tell how much radioactive exposure an     individual has received. Obviously, this one is part of     a Civil Defense kit which included one per user, plus at least     one Geiger counter.
    Now to see what others have guessed.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Let's see...as usual, guesses made without much actual knowledge.
1269 -- This would seemingly be used to trim something, perhaps photographs prior to mounting. The perforations on the arm with the sliding cutter seem to be arranged in inches, half inches, quarter inches, and selected eighth inches, and so would either make a measuring guide or a means for drawing parallel lines at whatever intervals are desired.
1270 -- This looks a lot like an oversized version of the mechanism many window blinds use to lock the height adjusting strings. I suspect it would be used to similar ends on a larger scale; the hook gets hung up (probably from a chain), and a rope is passed through the middle of the mechanism, where it works rather like a ratchet to allow something to be raised to a height but not lowered again until released. The "rope" may well be wire rope based on the generally massive character of the casting.
1271 -- Ummm...this seems to be a stand or support for something, adjustable to three different diameters of somethings. The unfolded picture is, I assume, of the something stand upside down, as the stops for the hinged parts would avoid collapse with it the other way around and the upturned bits at the far end of the extended arms keep the something from moving too far. The pointy prongs at the root of the forks are presumably to keep the something stand in place, either by driving them into wood or by letting them work into the ground.
What sort of somethings would you hold with one of these? I don't know, although I can picture a vessel like a cauldron or a frying pan.
1272 -- Possibly a marking hammer for indicating the owner of pulpwood logs (or any logs, I guess)?
1273 -- The body of this contraption appears to be a torch of some sort. Maybe it's a castrating tool to turn, say, a bull into a steer while cauterizing the wound in the same operation.
1274 -- This may be half of a cheap pocket telescope.
1275 -- Possibly a holder for birdshot for a muzzle-loading firearm? if so, I'd expect there must be a collection of a dozen or so end caps somewhere.
Now to see other guesses...
--
Andrew Erickson

"He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot
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1274 - that looks like one of those Cold War radiation dosimeters.
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1272 A log graders hammer?
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