What is it? Set 523

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column for an old airplane, or similar. Of course, I was unable to verify that I'm even close. -Bill
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Bill wrote:

master-cylinder (for braking) too. There is something "hydraulic" about it.
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Correct, the patent calls it a wagon wrench.
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On 12 Dec 2013 12:43:49 -0800

I saw that. Kinda funny that they only needed ONE wrench for the whole wagon back then? Can you imagine calling something a Car Wrench nowadays ;-)
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Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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counterpart. But it does make sense. Back in the day, many parts were made by the village blacksmith. And what manufacturers existed, I am sure there was not a great variety in parts, fasteners, bolts, etc. It would not have been smart to have a bunch of different size nuts (or bolts) on a wagon.
After all, where are bolts (and/or nuts) used on a wagon. Not being overly familiar with wagon (or carriages) I would assume that the wheel and hitch would be the only places where such a connector would have been needed. This is not high tech. I mean, the highest tech thing on that wagon, was the wheels. That is pretty low tech. I don't think that you need a full socket set and a torque wrench for that.
So it does make sense. Having known a couple blacksmiths, I have a full appreciation on how these guys at one time were the primary engineers-problem solvers-tool makers in the community. They may not be doing all that kind of work any more. But any blacksmith does have to be a bit creative to do their job. And they were involved in making wagons, even in just a supportive role.
Not bitching at you or anything. It IS interesting that it would be called a wagon wrench. But that was a much simpler time. You did not need that many tools to work on a wagon. Modern vehicles a a much different situation. How much does a modern mechanic spend on tools? Particularly if purchased from the professional suppliers.
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On 12/12/2013 1:07 PM, Lee Michaels wrote:

lever. The pieces all needed to be adjusted from time-to-time.
Paul
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Just to be picky, nowadays, for a car, there is only one tool needed or useful to the typical owner... a cellphone to call a tow. And for some cars, not even that is needed with cars that call for help by themselves.
I'll admit that sometimes a credit card is needed to scrape the ice off the windshield.
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The Fergusson Tractor was designed so that a single (double ended - different sizes at each end) spanner would fit every nut and bolt.
It was also calibrated to be used as a dipstick: http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MTIwMFgxNjAw/z/4CgAAMXQWzNSilsQ /$_35.JPG?set_id00005007
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    Posting from the newsgroup rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
3049)    Interesting. Two of the four (two at 90 degrees from each     other) have locknuts, and thus are expected to be kept at one     particular setting for a while, while the other two are expected     to be more frequently changed.
    Looks like a sphere being held, and perhaps 2-1/4" diameter at a     guess. Is that a billiard ball?
    But it sort of looks like it is designed to stress test the     ball, or to totally break it, likely using the larger pair of     cups once the smaller pair of push pads are holding it in place.
3050)    Some kind of adjustable transformer -- very early and     experimental based on the kind of wire insulation used.
    Multiple taps on the round ended part which slides in and out to     adjust the coupling.
    Also two multiple tap coils inside the box.
    I see no terminals on the sliding round coil, so I will assume     that the tap switch adjusts how many turns are shorted across.
    The other two coils, then, would give varying impedances     depending on where the moving coil is positioned. Likely     intended to adjust the balance of AC between the two, perhaps as     a position sensor.
3051)    Clamps onto something square (by turning the two handles), and     serves as a bench-top holder for the object.
    Is there a thread on the horizontal handle shafts, or is the     entire grip from the angled plates.
3052)    Strange pliers. Almost looks as though it is to crimp lead     seals on things like power meters.
3053)    Now, *this* one I *know*. (Just the first photo is sufficient).
    It is a "Rolls Razor", and this one is missing an important     part.
    The cover to the left is a honing stone, and the one to the     right is a leather strop covered with jeweler's rouge. The two     are keyed so each fits only into one side of the housing.
    The part standing up in the center is the razor blade, with a     guard which flips back and forth.
    The handle to the right is slid back and forth causing the blade     to rotate so it either moves edge-first on the hone side, or     edge last on the strop side.
    You would strop it before every shaving (just a few strokes),     and hone it only every so often.
    The one thing missing is the razor handle. which normally lives     nestled inside the strop/hone handle, but in normal use slides     over the back edge of the blade and clamps down by screwing the     handle.
    All in all -- a very nice long lived device for shaving, if you     shave. I used one for years before I switched to a beard and     saved minutes of each morning. :-)
3054)    It looks like a clip-on handle for some kind of cookware.
    Is that red a soft plastic dip, or a hard enamel coating?
    But I would like to see what it clips to, since it does not look     that secure. Perhaps if it was one of two it could be used to     lift something in a symmetrical way.
    Now to post and then see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Don... as is the case with pretty much any iron-core transformer, shorting turns (in a low-impedance coil) has the same effect as shorting the whole coil.
The contacts weren't intended to 'short coils', just to select taps.
I have no idea what it was originally for, but it's obviously a variable inductor of some sort -- maybe for tuning LF, ELF, or ULF radio, or for an experimentation bench.
Lloyd
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Good answer Lloyd, radio tuner is correct.
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HEH! Even a stopped clock is right twice a day! <G>
LLoyd
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Am 13.12.2013 02:30, schrieb DoN. Nichols:

The color of the winding reminds me of telephone wire, so i thought of a pupin coil first. Then i thought of an antenna matching circuit. I seems to be a part of a radio receiver: <http://www.stonevintageradio.com/description.php?IIq8&UID 131213122302> cheers Gunther
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Great job, that's a good link, I found one a little closer to mine on the same site.
No luck yet on the first one but the rest have been answered correctly this week:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2013/12/set-523.html#answers
Someone offered to make a video of the wire stripper in action, I'll post a link when I receive it.
Rob
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Just updated the wire stripper answer with photos that show it in use, instead of a video.
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2013/12/set-523.html#answers
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    I've seen similar wire used in really old radio receivers, (wrapped thread around the conductor) -- and perhaps in the windings of electric bells or buzzers.
    And I've seen the same color of wire (but a woven sleeve soaked with wax and slid over tinned copper single-strand wires) used in inter-relay wiring on Automatic Electric "Strowger" switches (part of a dial telephone exchange)

    I see that the shaving handle for the Rolls Razor is not actually missing, it was just not photographed in the first set of photos -- or you photoshopped it out for whatever reason. But I see it standing between the hone and the strop plates in the answers section.
    As for the first one, I just noticed today that it appears to be a zinc (or pot-metal) casting, so I would not expect it to be particularly strong if it was being used as a fixture for something like cross-drilling the ball.
    Maybe for holding it in the beam of an X-ray diffraction system used for studying structures of crystals. (I don't know what kind of material the ball would be --it would have to be something which did not contribute its own diffraction patterns to the photograph.

    That looks like a nice wire stripper for some types of wire, at least.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On 12/12/2013 1:22 AM, Rob H. wrote:

have to open by hand, now.
Paul
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