What is it? Set 516

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Thanks for the clarification, makes more sense now, I'll explain my misunderstanding it tomorrow when I post the answers.
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I thought your breadboard answer was very close since the old breadboards were used as a cutting board for bread, this device is the same thing except for a single slice. So I asked for clarification since I didn't think that breadboard was specific enough to call correct.
Still not sure about the handle in number 3011 but the rest of the answers for this week have been posted:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2013/10/set-516.html#answers
Rob
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"Rob H." wrote in message

I thought your breadboard answer was very close since the old breadboards were used as a cutting board for bread, this device is the same thing except for a single slice. So I asked for clarification since I didn't think that breadboard was specific enough to call correct.
Still not sure about the handle in number 3011 but the rest of the answers for this week have been posted:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2013/10/set-516.html#answers
Rob
Looks like would be good for punching a hole in a oil can. (when oil came in quart cans) WW
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On 10/25/13 9:29 PM, WW wrote:

The Dayton Malleable Iron Works, which became the Dayton Malleable Iron Company, had a D in a circle for its trademark. It was known for buggy wrenches and buggy fittings.
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On 10/24/13 3:13 PM, Rob H. wrote:

How about mouse bait? Put in a freshly baked slice of bread. Put it in a tub where mice can hop in but can't jump or climb out. As they work to get what little bread they can, the noise and odor will attract all the mice in the building.
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    Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
3007)    I'm going to make some possibly unjustified assumptions about     this one.
    1)    That it is a stainless steel.
    2)    That the inner end of the holes is well smoothed.
    If so --it could be to hold cut film (4x5") upright and allow     full access by developer through the holes (probably with     something like nitrogen burst aeration) to be used for     developing, stop-bath, fixing, and washing of the film in a     light-tight tank, or in a dark room.
    Is that wood at the bottom? If so, I hope that it is wax     covered so it does not absorb and retain the chemicals for one     of the baths to carry over to the next.
3008)    A changeable bit hammer impact drill. The tapered part shown as     a crossbar is the "drift key" to remove the tool, which is     fitted in a tapered socket. Usually used with Morse tapers, but     I suspect that this is a different taper because it is so short.
    Probably for drilling holes in concrete, and the rubber handle     protects the hand holding it from most of the shock from the     hammer. (And the mushroom upper end protects the hand from the     hammer during misses. :-)
3009)    If it had a bottom, I would think that it is intended to hold     a candle as a form of lantern. (And I guess that one could clip     in there.)
    Lacking that, a cage for a petrified snake stood on end? :-)
3010)    One end is a straight screwdriver blade. The other is to drive     a special head with a single offset hole into which the pin     fits.
    The pin -- and the slug of which it is a part, appear to be     spring loaded and slide into the sleeve of the body, to keep the     wrench from simply rotating around the pin.
3011)    Not enough detail and angle of view to really tell about this,     sorry. Perhaps if I had seen one as part of the whole machine,     I would recognize it.
3012)    The left three are intended to drive into two pieces of wood,     and to draw them together.
    The right-hand one appears to be for joining two pieces of wood     at right angles to a third piece, forming a 'T' joint.
    Now to post this and then see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,             DoN.
--
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C'mon, Don! The picture CLEARLY SHOWS the punched rim of each hole as being "toothed" (almost SPIKED), all the better to hold the slice of bread.
Lloyd
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3007. Reading all the other posts could it be for stale bread? Put your slice of bread in and pop it in the oven?
D
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That's not it
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Rob H. wrote:

It's a slice slicer. You put a slice of bread in it and use a knife to cut it in half.
--
Steve W.

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David

This answer was posted on rec.woodworking:
3007 : bread slicer
http://archive.pennysaverusa.com/category/merchandise-antiques-collectibles-antique_dealers/region/w-us-tx-titus-mount-pleasant-75455/duncannon-slice-a-slice-tea-sandwich-bread-slicer-vintage-29516920.html
John T.
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Bingo! Lloyd
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Correct! You get two quarter inch slices from a half inch one.
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Rob H. wrote:

3011 Resembles the pin in our old John Deere one-horse wagon. The round part dropped into a hole to connect the rear wheel assembly to the center of the front axle. On the side portion was a wrench for the wheel bolts. Two differences: It was a true right angle, and the sides of the wrench were longer.
--
 GW Ross 

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Thanks for the info. I just looked again at the email and saw that the owner said there was some text on it that said "99934-2" and "Circle D" but I didn't find anything when I did a quick search on it.
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-----

-----

drops into a little slot, and the other part is the where the user >steps up. -----

In response to the four separate posts seen above: Thanks for the suggestions, I've done some searching and haven't yet found any further information on this handle, though I did pass these ideas on to the owner of it. I think that we'll eventually get an answer for this one.
Rob
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