What is it? Set 508

Page 2 of 3  


2964 is definitely a model pulse jet engine.
I have a design for a model called "Lil' Torchy" that uses that same motor.
Lloyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Stormin Mormon wrote:

It appears to be the only thing tool/metalworking related in r.c.m this week. If it wasn't for this thread, I'd swear I was in rec.boats.
--
Paul Hovnanian mailto: snipped-for-privacy@Hovnanian.com
------------------------------------------------------------------
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/29/2013 3:02 AM, Rob H. wrote:

2959 is a hay knife
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Good answer, that's exactly what it is.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

2959. 30" long
It's a hay knife.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
2959)    Looks like a cutter from a motorized harvesting machine.
    At a guess -- for harvesting a cane type crop.
    The "larger image" links have gotten worse. Of three browsers, only one brings it up full size -- for a moment, and then goes blank.
2960)    An old forged bit for a metal-turning lathe. This one designed     for working around a ridge and turning inside that area.
2961)    Hmm ... from the angle of the photo it is not clear, but it     *looks* to me as though the crank is too close to the backboard     to allow it to be turned, so it is some kind of demonstration,     not a working tool.
    The smaller one might be for winding thread on a bobbin, but     again, the clearance for a full turn seems to be missing, at     this time on the cross-bar on the read part.
2962)    For separating coarse from fine parts of some grain product at     a guess.
2963)    A wood model of a shape to be cast in iron or bronze. The flat     side is put down in a half box, "Green sand" is poured around it     and pounded until it sets up fairly hard, then the half box     ("flask" is the official term, I think) is turned over and a     similar other half is prepared and joined to it -- with holes     for guiding the molten metal into the mold. Once the metal     cools enough, the sand is broken off and the metal then gets     whatever other post-processing is needed to make the final part.
2964)    A "Dynajet Redhead" -- a pulse jet for models which is started     with a bicycle pump, and once it is running, requires hearing     protection for all in the neighborhood. :-)
    Now to post and see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Remove oil spill source from e-mail
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | (KV4PH) Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"DoN. Nichols" wrote:

-------------------------------------------- Known as a pattern. ----------------------------------------------

------------------------------------------------------------------------ The top half of the box is called the "Cope". The bottom half of the box is called the "Drag". An assembled cope and drag is called the "Flask".
From an earlier life when I was involved in foundry automation design.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lew Hodgett wrote:

The "flask" is the outer containment structure for the sand mold. Usually a rectangular box. The two halves of the flask lock together and that keeps the two halves of the mold aligned and keeps the mold from separating due to the hydraulic pressure of the molten metal.
Most high production small castings are made using flaskless molding today. The mold are made as a long string of molds.
http://www.foundrytechnology.co.uk/list/info.php?page_id 
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'll look into having a secondary site to also host the larger images, and will let you know when I find one so we can test it before next Thursday.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Rob H." <

FYI, all the 'larger images' links have worked fine here....on w/XP IE8
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think the "larger image" issue for any browser has to do with having Java enabled. A lot of people disable it or never install it due to numerous security flaws.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"anorton" <

You may be right about that, anorton..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    Certainly disabled on *my* systems -- at least for browser access. Running of local code is a different matter, and is done on some systems behind the firewall.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Remove oil spill source from e-mail
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | (KV4PH) Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 30 Aug 2013 15:43:34 -0700
<snip>

I don't think that's the problem. I have both Java Script and Java (two separate things) disabled and the "larger image" loads just fine. I'm running the last version of the original Opera Browser, 12.16 on Linux. I suspect they are doing some weird browser sniffing. It will load okay using an old version of Opera 11 (Don has an old version of Opera 10). But if I try with an old version of Firefox a large image url reverts from:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album18/pic2959da.jpg
to:
http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album18/pic2959da.jpg.html
and a whole bunch of extra crap (an album webpage with viewer) comes up.
Don might get Opera to work by having it "spoof" or "mask" its identity as either Firefox or IE. Or just use wget to grab the file and display it with another graphics app...
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    But, I'm on Sun Workstations. Available browsers are Firefox, Opera (an older version -- they've stopped supporting Sun/Oracle), and an older Mozilla.
    IE8 just is not made to run on UltraSPARC machines, nor would I trust it given IE's (and Windows') sad security histories.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Remove oil spill source from e-mail
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | (KV4PH) Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/30/2013 5:20 PM, Rob H. wrote:

Try IMGUR
http://imgur.com/
It's a very good site for hosting pics. Just the pics, and nothing but the pics.
--
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks, I just posted some images there, hopefully that will work for him.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    Thanks,         DoN.
--
Remove oil spill source from e-mail
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | (KV4PH) Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I posted some larger images in an album at the link below, please let me know if these work on your computer:
http://imgur.com/a/3PV19
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/2/2013 7:02 AM, Rob H. wrote:

Worked for me.
--
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.