What is it? Set 498

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On 6/24/13 4:05 AM, Rob H. wrote:

living, that was like $25 today. In terms of wages, it was more. Many weren't paid $1 for a day's work.
I remember Blue Blades. The first shave was likely to cause pulling and nicks and leave incomplete results. The second shave was worse. I would have bought a sharpening device.
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    Razor blades were scarce and rationed (like anything else needed) during WW-II, so ways to make them last longer were desirable. One trick with a double-edged blade was to drop it in a glass tumbler, and (with the blade edges vertical) slide it around inside the walls. This I learned from my uncle, who was a Navy flyer during the Korean war.
    Also -- GIs were likely to be posted where the blades were even more difficult to come by -- so even if they were not too expensive, having a way to sharpen them was useful. (Or -- things to make them last longer, like the Burma Shave whose signs took over the roadside for a while.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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wrote:

One type I remember -- one of my uncles had one when I was a kid -- was a little hard Arkansas stone with a plano-concave hollow in one side. It was just a little wider than a double-edged blade and maybe twice as long.
You laid the blade in there, pushed in down in the middle with one finger to bend it a bit, and then work the blade around in a circle. Then you flipped the blade to do the other side.
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Ed Huntress

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    Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
2899)    Looks like a tool for scribing a number of lines parallel to the     edge of a piece of wood. Scribe one line (using the hex wood     block sliding along the edge), then rotate it to the next flat     and scribe the next, until all are done.
    Since all the adjustment pulls seem at the same level, yet the     scribe points at the other end are in steps of something like     1" spacing, based on the 8" overall length., it looks like that is the default     spacing of the lines -- though you can loosen one of the "tuning     pegs" and slide a scribe to a different depth.
    Since there is apparently no "tuning peg" on the bottom-most     flat, it is for five parallel lines, and may be related to a     music staff -- though why you would want to make one in wood is     not clear -- other than for decorative purposes.
2900)    If it were from earlier, I would consider it to possibly be a     container for needles for stitching up sails. Not sure what a     merchant marine would put in there. Maybe salt or some other     seasoning?
    As for opening it -- take two pieces of wood, drill holes which     are a slip fit near for the each of the two diameters one end of     each, cut a slot in the wood from the long end to the hole, and     when you squeeze the sides of the handle together, it will grip     the surface without distorting it.
    Is it steel, or silver? (Check with a magnet.)
2901)    These are a set of levels -- most for horizontal or vertical     surface checks, though the last is for horizontal surfaces only.
    The longer the distance from pivot to plumb bob, the more     resolution.
2902)    These look like two scribe points for some form of trammel     (like a divider, but all mounted on a beam instead of a hinged     pair of legs.) The center one could hold a larger pivot point     to fit into an existing hole.
2903)    A wood-turning chisel -- apparently to make a sharp     right-angled corner.
2904)    An optical tool for sure. It looks as though it is intended to     accept a narrow beam from below (assuming the handle is     vertical), deflect it to something held in the clip, and it     looks like it will hold a single-edged razor blade, likely for     the knife-edge test of a mirror lens being made for an     astronomical telescope.
    It is probably made to be sold to amateur telescope makers.
    Maybe it it held with the handle down, and the eye above looking     down on the 45-degree mirror (probably first-surface).
    I am surprised that the cavity surrounding the 45-degree mirror     is not painted flat black.
2838)    So -- someone finally identified this one. Thanks.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On 6/20/13 10:51 PM, DoN. Nichols wrote:

thread to measure its weight in a container of water to calculate the density. If it's solid steel, I'd think it must be a pin to keep something mechanical from moving. On a ship, you probably wouldn't need a padlock to keep somebody from removing such a pin: just a fob with the initials of the authority who had disabled the device.
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I asked the owner if it was solid or hollow but haven't heard back yet. I was thinking it could be a match safe to keep them dry while on a ship.
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On 6/21/13 6:00 PM, Rob H. wrote:

be from the 19th Century. Joshua Pusey invented book matches in 1879 because his match safe spoiled the appearance of his suit. Advertising appeared on book matches in 1897, and that greatly increased production. Lighter flints went into production in 1907. In WWI, I've read of soldiers using book matches and lighters but not stick matches. The Zippo, known for being windproof and reliable, came out in 1932.
In "The Sand Pebbles," a worker inside a steam engine was killed because a saboteur had removed the locking mechanism. The author had been an engineer on a similar vessel. If the danger was known, one would want a tamper-proof pin. Perhaps the groove described by the owner was made for a slotted plate to engage. Put the pin in, slide the plate on, and screw the plate down with tamper-proof screws. The ship's engineer would have the special screwdriver. Perhaps SE stands for Ship's Engineer. If it's solid, that's my guess!
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