What is it? Set 477

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This week's set has been posted:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
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2775, A water valve 'key'.
2778, A distributor wrench.
Erik
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Correct
I was thinking brake bleeder wrench but I'm not 100% sure.
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On 1/24/2013 2:32 PM, Rob H. wrote:

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The owner said: "Both ends are boxed and 5/8 size", what size are distributor wrenches?
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IIRC, my old Dodge Dart was 1/2 inch.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
The owner said: "Both ends are boxed and 5/8 size", what size are distributor wrenches?
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IIRC, most american cars were 1/2" or 9/16"... maybe even a few 7/16". I think 5/8" is a bit big for distributors. Not too many metric distributor wrenches, I think there might have been a 15mm for some Cadillac and VW applications. Most foreign cars were 10 or 12mm and didn't require special tools.
Now thinking 2778 might be a special... like maybe for getting to Diesel injection pump hold down bolts. But thats just a wild guess.
Erik
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On 1/24/2013 4:12 PM, Rob H. wrote:

I cant imagine a reason for both ends being the same sized, I highly suspect a mismeasurement.
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On Thu, 31 Jan 2013 08:30:52 -0600
<snip>

I thought the same thing but if you study the image it looks like there are two different lengths involved (shrug). Would like to have it in my hands to verify though :)
The link that J. Burns posted is very similar but only has one box end:
http://home.comcast.net/~alloy-artifacts/cornwell-quality-tools-p2.html
That same site has reference to Thorsen catalogs here:
http://home.comcast.net/~alloy-artifacts/thorsen-manufacturing.html
Might be worth someone asking if they could check those catalogs for said item...
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
  Click to see the full signature.
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On 1/31/13 9:30 AM, Leon wrote:

The shafts appear to be different lengths. One appears to be 8", like Rob's. The other appears to be 9.5". Perhaps the shorter shaft wouldn't reach the bolts in some starters, but with the longer shaft, there was an obstruction in the way of the handle with some other cars.
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Brake bleeders typically 3/16 inch, and typically out in the open. The brakes I've bled used either a common box wrench, or socket wrench. No need for the offset.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

I was thinking brake bleeder wrench but I'm not 100% sure.
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Noooo.... 10mm om most small foriegn cars, 7/16 or 1/2" on most older domestic models. 10mm or 12mm on most modern metricized US cars.
And I guess you haven't worked on many different cars. The brake bleeder fitting is often stuck up around where a control arm connects, or is hidden in a stiffening pocket in the brake dust cover. A lot of them are not easy to get to, at all!
LLoyd
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Thanks for telling me that you know my life better than I know it. Hey, what did I have for breakfast?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote in message

Noooo.... 10mm om most small foriegn cars, 7/16 or 1/2" on most older domestic models. 10mm or 12mm on most modern metricized US cars.
And I guess you haven't worked on many different cars. The brake bleeder fitting is often stuck up around where a control arm connects, or is hidden in a stiffening pocket in the brake dust cover. A lot of them are not easy to get to, at all!
LLoyd
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crow. LLoyd
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On 1/24/2013 3:32 PM, Rob H. wrote:

--
Jeff

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I'm going to go with this answer for now, I haven't been able to find another one just like it on the web. The rest of the answers for this week can be seen here:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2013/01/set-477.html#answers
Thanks to everyone who answered the two unidentified items this week.
Rob
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On 1/25/13 5:46 PM, Rob H. wrote:

it could be turned only 15 degrees or so. I'm trying to imagine something with 5/8" screw heads and so little room to turn a wrench several inches above.
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Since I haven't been able to find one like it on the web, I just changed my answer to:
"Haven't been able to verify any of the guesses yet for this wrench"
Hopefully we'll be able to nail it down in the near future.
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I just sent Thorsen Tool Co. an email asking about the wrench, with any luck they will provide the answer.
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On 1/25/13 6:52 PM, Rob H. wrote:

I've found something similar. http://home.comcast.net/~alloy-artifacts/cornwell-quality-tools-p2.html
Fourth item from the bottom. It has only one box, so you'd need room to swing the handle 30 degrees.
*********
Fig. 93 shows a Cornwell [BW]94 5/8 specialty box wrench for starter motor applications, stamped "11 Cornwell" and "94" on the shank.
The overall length is 10.2 inches, and the finish is plain steel, with extensive pitting due to rust.
The Cornwell catalog 21A of 1941 provides our earliest catalog reference for this model, where it is listed as a BW94 starter motor wrench, recommended for Pontiac, Oldsmobile, and Chrysler applications. The catalog also notes its use for holding the eccentric bolt on 1939 Chevrolet steering systems.
The markings on this example suggest a mid 1930s origin, in particular the use of the "94" model number without the "BW" prefix, and the lack of a "USA" marking.
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