What is it? Set 371

Page 3 of 3  
On Jan 16, 7:32pm, "Stormin Mormon"

...you only had one grandfather? Ummm, okay. Guess it runs in the family.
May I suggest cloning? Just do away with all of that messy sexual reproduction stuff.
R
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On Sun, 16 Jan 2011 13:19:24 -0800 (PST)
<snip>

I suspected that, but not knowing how old or where your are from...
I was lucky, we had a decent shop class in high school. Both wood and metal, wish I had put more effort into the metal classes. Nothing in school that would explain how to use a scythe though.
<snip>

Don't let me woo you, it is work, plain and simple. Wear some decent gloves or you'll most like get blisters to prove it :) Light cotton gloves with the rubber facing work pretty good. Give a decent grip and don't become unbearable during a hot day. I much prefer the sound of swish, swish, swish rather than the annoying BRAAAAAAP from a weed-whacker. I have one, but I don't like using it. For tall weeds and briers I kinda feel that the scythe works better anyway. The downside is that you end up with a lot of long debris, stalks laying around. For me this isn't really a problem though and no different than weed-whackers.
Read, study the part of the book that explains adjusting the handles to your body. Getting them in approximately the right place to begin with is a big help. Work with it that way for awhile before making any major changes. I prefer having both handles on the same side, pointing towards me. My Dad had one forward and one back. If he was still around I would ask him why, but I suspect he just started using a scythe with them positioned that way and just got used to it.
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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"Leon Fisk" wrote: <snip>

Goats, the silent weed-whacker.
Lew
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wrote:

When I was about 12 years old I persuaded an uncle to teach me how to use a scythe. I lived to regret it.
Max (grew up in Shiawassee county, MI)
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On 1/17/2011 5:26 PM, Max wrote:

LOL. You ain't lived till you've cleared brush with a brush scythe on a ski slope.
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Gack! I could barely handle flat terrain.
Max
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I don't have a patent, just the link on the answer page and a reference in the Dictionary of American Hand Tools.
Rob
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On Jan 14, 10:31pm, somebody wrote:

I just checked out that link. What a great German web site! I was browsing their course offerings and they only had twenty or thirty I am interested in. I was also interested in their $1000 chisel sets, but I managed to keep my credit card in my wallet. ;)
R
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I think 2138 is a weight used in an oldtime two-pan balance, usually in a store for measuring things sold by weight.
Joe Gwinn
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On 1/16/11 4:28 PM, Joseph Gwinn wrote:

How about the end of a holder for 20 six-pence coins?
It would be like a roll of 20 nickels, amounting to a convenient 10 shillings or 1/2 pound. The diameter of 2138 is 22mm, while the diameter of a 6 pence was 19mm. The only other coin small enough was the 3 pence, at 16mm.
The spring would have left the stack loose with 19, made it snug with 20, and not allowed 21. That way, anyone who handled the holder would know it contained 20.
Perhaps coins were transferred in a holder from one till to another, or perhaps they were slid into paper rolls.
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J Burns wrote:

You're right, it is a sixpence holder that holds up to 20 tanners which equals 10 bob. carried in the pocket.
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Antique-Vintage-Sixpence-Pocket-Coin-Holder-Dispenser-/370470490159
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On 1/18/11 5:44 PM, J.P. wrote:

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Antique-Vintage-Sixpence-Pocket-Coin-Holder-Dispenser-/370470490159
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J Burns wrote:

Used to have one myself but I never filled it up.
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On 1/18/11 6:14 PM, J.P. wrote:

Do you have any pics of it? I don't like to complain, but the ebay one has unsightly rust.
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J Burns wrote:

open it.
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http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Antique-Vintage-Sixpence-Pocket-Coin-Holder-Dispenser-/370470490159
Thanks for the link, I'm sure the owner of this one will be happy to get the answer for it.
Rob
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On 1/18/11 9:21 AM, J Burns wrote:

US Patents 245 912 (1881), 293 033 (1884), and 366 075 (1887) are for split-cylinder boxes to hold a certain number of coins. A spring-loaded button like 2138 at the end of one of these boxes would make it quick and easy to fill such a box by feel. Presumably the button would be removable in case lint or grit had to be cleaned out.
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Good guess! And great job on solving this item, I'll pass this information on to the owner.
Rob
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