What is it? Set 371

Page 2 of 3  


You have the right idea but this one was made to be used with corn husks.
No luck on the two unidentified items but the rest of the answers can be seen here:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2011/01/set-371.html#answers
Rob
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Just found the patent for the last one, turns out that it's a bed tightener, the patent link has been posted on the answer page.
Rob
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God-dayum! That fencewire-stringing machine is a beauty to behold.
Thanks for that.
-- Jeff R.
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Everyone seems to agree that 2139 is a handle for a stove plate, and they're probably right, but to me, who's never owned a cast iron stove, it looks like a "church key" - a bottle opener. I have owned bottles...at least temporarily. ;)
R
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There are no correct guesses for this one yet.
Rob
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Rob H. wrote:

How about a tool for handling wire--say, #2 guage?
Bill

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Yes, it's for working with wire, but there is a more specific term that describes its use better than 'handling'.
Rob
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On Thu, 13 Jan 2011 11:35:08 -0500, Rob H. wrote:

Looks like a wire wrapping tool The 2 wires are passed through the hook on the tool one is bent towards us in the pic and then the tool is moved around the wire to create a twisted joint
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This answer and Steve's are both correct, typically it was used on wire fences.
Rob
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Rob H. wrote:

Looks like a wire twister. Used to make coiled joins in wire.
--
Steve W.
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    Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as always:
2137)    One of many forms of stakes which are placed in the     hardy hole (the square hole) in an anvil.
2138)    Does the back dome invert its curvature and then restore     when released -- often after a delay?
    If so -- then it is a variant of a hopping disk -- often it pops     as it is warmed up by resting in a hand.
    As for the markings -- they suggest old UK monitory units, 20     shillings 6 pence.
2139)    Looks like a removable handle for either a cooking container, or     perhaps a lid for one of the cooking holes in a wood stove.
2140)    I don't want to play! :-)
    Perhaps for holding one end of some leather as it is being     processed?
2141)    Skewers for closing an opening in a carcass while it is     being cooked. The skewers go through from side to side,     and a lacing is put over the skewers on either end to draw the     opening closed.
2142)    Something for pulling together two objects to close a gap.
    Since back then, adhesives were not strong enough, I suspect     that it was inlaid into a recess in the two objects, and then     the center turnbuckle was used to draw the end pieces (and thus     the two objects) closer together.
    Now to see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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The anvil is for peining the edge of a sythe, the steel of which are softer than you would think and are pounded out thin and work hardened at the same time and then stoned. A thick edge is useless.
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wrote:

The anvil is for peining the edge of a sythe, the steel of which are softer than you would think and are pounded out thin and work hardened at the same time and then stoned. A thick edge is useless.
Good answer, this is correct.
Rob
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That's an odd one. I understand the metallurgical reasoning, but I don't understand the compound curve of the anvil. Wouldn't that tend to leave a rippled edge? A rippled edge would be bitch to sharpen. Do you have a patent reference on that one by any chance or a link? I'd like to read a bit more about it to see how they did it.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

Ive used mine and it only ripples a very small amount. In fact the swiss cythers didnt put a sharpening stone to the edge after swaging it to a razor edge. the hammer they and I used is a flat head and the small anvil is domed. you only swage the 1/8thin edge bit of the cythe. you should be able to replicate the technique with any metal with a hard faced ball peen hammer gripped in a vice and another hammer to do the work Ted Dorset UK
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Okay, Ted, thanks for the info. Maybe I'll give it a shot on a hand scythe I've never used that's been laying around forever.
R
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On Fri, 14 Jan 2011 18:41:46 -0800 (PST)
<snip>

Not the best copy, but "The Scythe Book" may help. Page 20 has "peening" info (7.2mb).
http://www.cd3wd.com/cd3wd_40/JF/417/06-273.pdf
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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Thanks for the link, Leon.
Page 20 says this: "The edge of the blade rests perfectly flat on the anvil." And it told of tilting the scythe when peening. I can now see how tilting the scythe's curved blade would eventually find a flat "plane" on the curved anvil. While Page 24 has this: "The edges, no longer perfectly straight, have become a little wavy, showing that the wear and/or sharpening has been uneven. However, this is acceptable for a scythe, and does not impair its performance."
Damn. I knew I should have paid attention in high school hand mowing class, but I was more interested in checking out the cute girls in my animal husbandry class. ;)
R
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On Sat, 15 Jan 2011 13:38:25 -0800 (PST)
<snip>

Yes, girls were a distraction, but there wasn't any classes for stuff like this during my time in school...
My Dad and Grandfather on my Mother's side were the scythe experts, especially Grandfather. Sadly he passed away long before I had any interest in such things. Both of them were still swinging scythes to mow misc things well into their 80's. I still use Dad's old scythe and just last year bit the bullet and bought a new one. Wanted one with a brush blade and aluminum snath. I use mine for rough work, weeds, briers, small saplings... really works a treat on them. For that type of work they don't need to be razor sharp. If you plan on cutting stuff like grass though, you want to have it as sharp as you can make it. That is when some peening would be in order along with some serious whetting to touch it up every so often during use.
There are several good websites explaining scythe use too.
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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I said that in jest. My high school didn't have shop class, or really anything. Come to think of it, my high school was a jest but I didn't know it at the time.

You're making it sound fun, and I want to go give it a shot, but as there's a foot and a half of snow on the ground I think I'll wait. ;)
BTW, thanks for the word "snath". Chalk up another one for the Scrabble arsenal. I _love_ hearing, "That's not a word!"
R
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