What is it? Set 334

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    Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
1915)    Looks like an expanding scraper to put a nice finish     on the ID of a bore.
    Some, I've seen with flaps of sandpaper and rotated by an     electric drill or a drill press or milling machine.
    This one is for a workpiece which is being rotated by ( perhaps )     a lathe.
    Assuming that the image has not been reversed (they sometimes     have, here) it either is for a workpiece being rotated in     reverse on the typical lathe, or it is the leading edge of the     flaps which cuts -- and I would expect that to generate forces     beyond the ability to grip the wooden handle and prevent it from     rotating with the workpiece.
1916)    A wrench for use by a firefighter. The smaller socket     (pentagonal) is for the valve stem on a fire hydrant, and I     think also fits the caps over the openings. The crescent is     probably for tightening the hose onto the hydrant. I'm not     quite sure where the big hex socket would be applied. Looks     like about 2-1/2" between flats, assuming that is a 2x4 that is     is resting on.
1917)    Hmm ... designed to attract and trap flying insects like bees or     wasps? The sliding door is to release them into some other     container, or to free them -- or to allow smoking them into     insensibility for transfer to another container?
1918)    To guide something like a large hose into a hole?
1919)    For holding ground glass onto which an image is projected by     some other part not visible with a lens or a pinhole?
1920)    One edge for cutting while rocking the blade (sort of like     an early pizza cutter), and the other end looks as though it is     for crimping a lid onto a container -- sort of like an oversized     cap for a soda bottle.
    Now to see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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I forgot that the owner of this device had given further description of it in his email:
"There are two of them, they are a mirror image of one another (maybe right and left). Each segment has a "part number" BP 96, BP 97, BP 98 BP 99, BP100, BP 101, BP102,BP 103, BP110 and BP111. The larger end is BP110 The smaller end is BP 111 and the center is BP100. The ends are the only difference, they are reverse of each other large to small. all part numbers are the same from left to right except the ends. It springs shut but only opens as wide as I showed you in the pic.they are not made of steel, it is an alloy maybe magnesium the springs are not rusted so maybe stainless, but the pins are rusted a bit. The parts are cast and then some machine work that appears to fit well so fairly modern. The other one (right) that I left at the store has what looks like some sort of rubber cement on the flat side that I think is the bottom."
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Could they be "emergency" glue-on horseshoes, for like, when a broken hoof prevents nailing a new one one?
LLoyd
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Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

How about removing a glued-on shoe? The spring holds it in place as the farrier taps the wedges into the glue line.
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I'm still not sure about number 1918, don't know if it could be used for horse shoes or not, but the rest of the answers can be found here:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2010/04/set-334.html#answers
Rob
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1917 - filter used for HVAC?
Bill
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Oops, that one was answered, sorry.
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