What is it? Set 290

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I need some assistance identifying two of them this week:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
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1655 Guess Set of stippling tools used in etching.

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1654. Mikuni make carburettors etc, looks like a fuel pump with a few parts missing. You can see the in/out ports - dual carbies.
The rest - wouldn't have a clue.
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Rob H. wrote,on my timestamp of 25/06/2009 6:36 PM:

1656 - horseshoe nails
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I wondered the same thing - they are long 2 1/2", maybe this is normal, high heels maybe??
:)
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Dennis wrote,on my timestamp of 25/06/2009 8:36 PM:

No. They hammer them in slanted, the tip comes off the side of the hoof and is then cut off. The remaining bit is filed flush with the hoof. (spent too many days of my youth watching a farrier at work...)
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That makes sense, I guess they'd hurt a bit otherwise. The only horse podiatry I've seen is a horse getting its hooves trimmed & the gunk underneath cleaned out. The farm dog had a good feed on the scraps.
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The tips are beveled on only one side too. When the nails are driven, that side is always toward the center of the hoof. That causes the nail to bend slightly to the outside. With a slanted start, that makes it less likely the nail will penetrate to the live tissues of the hoof and helps assure it leaves enough outside to cut off and clinch.
Farriery: A job that makes old folks out of young folks very quickly. :)
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On Thu, 25 Jun 2009 08:14:22 -0400, John Husvar

Grand father started practicing the trade in Shannonville Ontario in 1882 age 8 in his father's shop. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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Yes, I've known a few aged farriers too. Not having done a statistical study, I can't say how many reach advanced age still practicing. But I've known more who gave up the job before 40 too, usually because of injuries by fractious horses.
Most of the older ones I've known in 40+ years of being owned by horses won't work on a bad horse more than one or two times. Then they tell the owner to find somebody else or have a vet on site with tranquilizer - or carry some themselves.
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John Husvar wrote:

My policy is three strikes. Less if the "Owner" tells me that the horse "never did that before" I can say that it is rewarding at times.
--
Steve W.

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wrote:

My cousin and his father were race-track farriers. My uncle lasted to 45 before his back gave out. My cousin died at age 36, so we never got to see how he would hold up.
-- Ed Huntress
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On Thu, 25 Jun 2009 20:38:20 -0400, "Ed Huntress"

Grandfather moved away from the trade around 1900 to more interesting work like converting the Ford 999 from tiller steering to a more motorcycle type of "handlebar" so that Barney Oldfield would accept the challenge of driving it. Junior was amazed to discover that "It's made of wood!" when we visited the Ford museum some years ago. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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wrote:

Oh, that's interesting. I've seen photos of old 999.
-- Ed Huntress
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I forgot to measure them so 2-1/2" was my guess, they are probably closer to 2" long, I just changed the number on my web site to this shorter value, though according to the link below they are sold in lengths ranging from 41 - 80mm (1.6 - 3.1 inches).
http://www.cottamhorseshoes.com/horseshoe_nails.htm
Rob
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Rob H. wrote:

The length varies depending on the horses hoof size and the type of shoe used as well as the location you're installing the nail. The idea is that you use a nail that is just long enough that it can be clinched and cut.
--
Steve W.

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There's a big difference between a Shetland Pony's hoof and a Percheron's hoof...
--
Kiva - Loans that change lives.
http://www.kiva.org/lender/david87375440
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Grandfather regularly made novelty rings from horseshoe nails which would require a nail longer than 2 1/2" Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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Oh yeah, I used to make rings out of them too! The farrier would let me have a go at them, at a corner of the shop where he had a heavy metal table top to fine tune the horseshoes. Good fun and the rings looked very "macho" at school: I scored a few pecks from the girls as a result. They liked them as pendants in leather necklaces, as well! ;)
Dang, now I'm all reminiscent...
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1653 is a wood turning tool.
It is used to turn grooves to a particular diameter. If you are copying a piece, you adjust the tool like a caliper to the original and then use to cut a corresponding groove in the duplicate. You hook the tool over the piece in the lathe and push down. When the tool drops to the other side of the work piece, the grove is the same dia as the original.
Paul K Dickman

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