What is it? Set 253

Back to my usual schedule this week, a new set has been posted:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
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1430 looks like a beehive: the two notches at the bottom are the "in" and "out" doors for the bees, and the two stick crossd inside it are to help support the weight of the comb.
1434: a bullseye lantern?
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1432- the wine-cellar master.
Dave
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1432- the wine-cellar master.
Not likely, unless wine is poured into buckets. There is a prominent bucket hook above the spout.
wrote:

1432- the wine-cellar master.
Dave
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Rob H. wrote:

1428 - for measuring the length of rope a person is buying
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1428 is a planimeter for measuring distances or areas on a map.
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wrote:

Let's see...
1428 - Measurer for some purpose. The removable wheel hints that maybe different sized wheels were available for different measurement units. Given the diameter of the wheel shown, I suspect it might count in feet. Presumably this would be used for some continuous feed application, maybe measuring the throughput of a web press or similar.
1429 - It's a white cat in a snowstorm!
1430 - It, ummm, probably served its intended purpose right well...what with the lid keeping the insides in and the outside out, and the notches doing...something.
1431 - This pretty plainly clamps around something (perhaps loosely), and then has a hasp to either lock it with a padlock or attach a clip or rope to. I can't really think where you'd need a quick-acting lockable clamp to go around a pole, though. It could perhaps be used to tether an animal (with a snap hook on the tether line), but I'd imagine that simply tying the tether off to the pole or whatever would be just as quick and require less complicated gadgetry.
1432 - Who would use a locking spigot for a barrel? Maybe the captain of a sailing ship who wishes to preserve his rum supply (or, I guess, any other purveyor of spirituous beverages to unrefined persons).
1433 - Appears to be a wobble plate mechanism, but the application isn't clear. Possibly it's to cause vibration of a machine (say, for a feed hopper or paper jogger).
1434 - Signal lantern, possibly of military application, but I'd guess instead railroad or nautical use.
Not very good guesses from me this time, I'm afraid.
--
Andrew Erickson

"He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot
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Oops, looks like I misnumbered the first one in this set, it's fixed now.

You're on the right track, it is a part from a power tool.
Rob
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    [ ... ]

    :-)
    :-)
    Hmm ... you know -- dogs have an amazing ability to wrap a particularly long leash around the center pole so they have only six inches of slack left. This would prevent that, at least.
I was thinking that it might go around the leg of a calf (too small for grown cattle) but your idea may make more sense.

    The owner of the contents of said barrel in the presence of a bunch of people who would like to partake of the contents of said barrel without paying for it. :-)

    The captain -- or the first mate or the Bosun perhaps, as being closer to the actual task of dispensing said beverage.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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    Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
1428)    Device to measure linear speed -- on a conveyer belt,     bandsaw blade, sanding belt, or something similar.
    The dials are first set to zero. The lower one possibly by     pressing one of the two levers on the bottom to disengage the     worm drive from the lower dial, and the upper one by pressing     the other lever to withdraw the pinion in the center of the     lower dial from meshing with the upper dial.
    Maybe a single lever will move the lower disk, disengaging it     from both the worm and the upper disc making zeroing easier.
    Then the rubber rim of the wheel is placed in contact with the     moving surface, and held there for a precise time duration,     after which the number of feet per minute (or perhaps meters per     minute, depending on where and when it was made) can be read off     the dials. Given that the place of manufacture shows as     Manchester (England?) and the age based on appearance, it would     have been feet per minute.
    Since it appears to have three scales on each dial, I suspect     that it could be used for three different periods depending on     the speed range. Nope -- make that two different periods, with     the two inner scales reading in different directions, depending     on the direction of motion of the belt.
    I would like to see other views of it to see how the reset     operation goes.
1429)    Hmm ... where did 1429 go?
1430)    Hmm ... some other kind of trap for "trap shooting"?
    Not sure of the function of the notches at the bottom.
1431)    Looks like it would fit around the pipes of a chain-link     fence -- but that is unlikely to be found on a ranch.
    Perhaps to go around the legs of a calf to hold it for branding?
1432)    This would be used by a bartender or pub operator to tap a keg     of beer. Looks like from the period where you could buy a     bucket of beer, so the tab on the front of the spout could hold     the bail of the bucket.
1433)    Kind of small -- but it looks like something which could be     used for closing collets with a drawbar -- perhaps in a     specialized jeweler's lathe.
1434)    Perhaps a long-burning kerosene lantern -- with the kerosene     reservoir on the back part?
    Now to see what others have guessed.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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    But it *does* show me what I needed to see. One of those two rivets (I think the one on the left) is in a slot on the underlying part, and pulling the levers at the bottom to the right pivots around the other rivet, pulling the lower wheel both out of mesh with the worm, and its pinion out of mesh with the upper wheel, thus allowing them both to be rotated by the other hand to set to zero.

    O.K. I don't remember that one item -- must be before I started following these.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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wrote:

I would have liked to have this device, but the seller wanted $375 for it, a lot more than I usually pay for the ones that I buy.
Rob
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    [ ... ]

    FWIW -- I have a couple of other devices which are similar except that they give direct readings in SFM (Surface Feet per Minute). Without the wheel, they have other slip-on devices for measuring RPM instead. One has a diameter of 3.1897", which gives a circumference of 12", and the other's wheel has a diameter of 1.9099", giving a circumference of 6", and requires the reading from the scale to be divided by two.
    If I had that one from your puzzle photos, I would be tempted to re-tire the wheel.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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1429: Looks like a fifth-wheel device for measuring distance travelled. Can't imagine what such a small one is for.
1431: Looks like a gate latch of some sort, with a spot for a padlock.
1432: A tap used on an inspection port for some chemical tank, keyed so only the inspector can use it?
1433: One possible design of a tail slider on a model helicopter but I doubt that's actually what it is.
1434: Bee carrier?
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