What is it? CXLIV

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A new set of photos has just been posted:
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com /
Rob
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828. Hand held transit.

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more accurately - Hand sighting level <http://www.contractor-books.com/CB/Optical_Levels/Hand_Levels.htm

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Thanks for the link, I was looking for one like mine on the web but didn't have any luck.
Rob
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823 looks similar to some old autoshutter-timer for cameras
824 is it used for casting small parts? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casting
825 a whatthehellisthis 825 second guess: caliber for inner side of tubes?
826 to squeeze the wather out of clothes?
827, 828 same as 825
greetings from germany chris
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I came in too late this time (hectic life right now) to answer before the answers were posted. However I'll make come comments on a couple of items.

    I don't believe the "Finishing nails" part, as all finishing nails that I have seen have at least some bulge for a head.
    Looking at the shaped points, I find myself wondering whether it could be electrodes for a TIG welding gun.
    The numbers on the dial could be sizes, or materials.

    Did you change the text on the "questions" page when you posted the answers? I don't see a question left -- you seem to have it fully answered.
    [ ... ]

    828 was the only one which I was likely to really get before the answers came up. I've seen them advertised many times, but never actually handled one.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Sounds like a good possibility, I'll see what I can find on your electrodes idea.

Thanks for letting me know, I meant to modify the answer page but accidently choose the wrong site to edit, it's fixed now.
Rob
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R.H. wrote:

823- some kind of dial-o-matic container where you dial the internal bin you want to line up with the little spring-loaded lid. But to hold... pencil leads?
824- 2-man sledgehammer for... hammering big sledges.
825- used in the maintenance of strowger switches. How? What, you can't tell I'm guessing?
826- Yet another kind of cotton carder.
827- You turn the center knob, it pulls the legs up into the device, causing the 3 circular pads to grip... something.
828- I want to say a scintillometer but the level blows that theory...
Dave
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Yes, it's a container and it holds something about the size of pencil lead but they are made of metal and range in size from 9/16" to 13/16", they also have different diameters:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album%205/pic823d.jpg
Rob
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On Thu, 16 Nov 2006 22:38:55 GMT, "R.H."

Hi Rob,
With the latest image/clue, maybe a hardness tester? It looks like one of the pointy objects is made of brass or something similar.
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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824. Fred Flintstone's rabbit ear's antenna.
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827. Can opener
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824. The two handles are weird. I can't see two people having the right coordination and you wouldn't need two-person strength to swing that. I'm guessing it's used for standing on a rail and hitting squarely in a perpendicular directions. Maybe for removing railroad ties?
827. It looks like a beading machine for circular tops. A can closer?
R
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snipped-for-privacy@worldemail.com says...

I think 824 is meant to be used by one person tamping down earth.

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RicodJour wrote:

My 16-pound maul has the momentum to split logs much better than a 10-pound hammer. I have made a 50-pound hammer to drive fence posts quickly and without damage. I can't imagine handling anything more than 50 pounds alone.
In the days before hydraulic tools, a 71-pound hammer would have served important functions. The men would pick up the two-handled hammer close to their bodies. In letting it fall, they would watch to keep the head from tilting to one side. The coordination would be as easy as putting down a table without spilling a cup of coffee sitting on it.
An ancient two-handled hammer has been found in a limestone quarry in Egypt. The head is limestone. I imagine it was for driving wooden wedges. If you tried to drive a wooden wedge under a big stone block with a little hammer, you would damage the wedge but not move it.
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Doghouse wrote:

If someone did swing a tool that heavy I bet you I can guess his first name, "Sir!" And don't leave off the exclamation point if you know what's good for you. ;)

I'm not sure I understand. Are you saying that it's movement in operation was straight up and straight down? Someone mentioned tamping earth, but the present day tools for compacting earth are more like 20 pounds. Having such a heavy weight wouldn't speed things up much. Two guys with two 20 pound tampers would move more quickly. The side faces are also chamfered/rounded, so I imagine those would be the business faces.

Okay, but this isn't Egypt and it wasn't used for building pyramids. The tool is probably a hundred or hundred and fifty years old, right? When stone masons split rock, they use iron feathers and wedges, not wood wedges. It doesn't make much sense to have an iron tool and wood wedges. I would bet dollars to donuts that it's a railroad tool used for nudging ties into place and straightening out the track.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

I wouldn't be able to swing a 50-pounder. Mine is a pipe with a lead weight. Inside the pipe, at the bottom of the weight, is a piece of tire tread. It's heavy to lug around, but if I put the pipe over the top of a fence post, pick it up, and let it drop, it will transfer a lot of momentum to the post. A lighter hammer would tend to damage the end of the post and bounce off.

Sledge hammers are usually but not always used up and down.

There's a limit to the kind of tamping you can do with a 20-pound tamper. The force from the blow of a light weight doesn't last as long, so the material being struck may simply spring back. It would be hard to split firewood with a tack hammer.

I wonder where to find out what tools crews used.
As an iron hammer could be used on wood ties, it could be used on wood wedges. The limestone hammer surprised scientists because it could not be used on metal.
The size of a hammer can be important in splitting rock. If the hammer is too small for the job, all you can do is damage the iron wedge.
I have seen a photo of a two-handled hammer. It was a group posing in a foundry. Two men whom I would call "Sir!" are holding the hammer high as if about to swing down.
I wonder if it was to deliver a lot of momentum to a mold in order to make a casting pop loose.
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828. Sight level for finding a place on the same level on a distant object as one's present position?
You stand somewhere, and look through the sight level. When the top or internal level is centered, what you're looking at is at the same height or level as you are. I'm not sure how the level is viewed, via a mirror or another spirit level inside the device.
One made my first boss a millionaire. He used a sight level to find out if a farm he thought to buy was on the same level as the coalfields west of it. It was, and he made mucho bucks selling the strip mining rights.
He also insisted on back filling and contour restoration. Once the earth had settled, he sold the land as building lots and also built some houses on spec.
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Usually no magnification. Still in use today.
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823. The closest thing it reminds me of is a split-shot dispenser in my fishing tackle box. It would appear to hold ten types of thing which are about an inch long and a few mm wide. I think sewing needles might be a bit too long. Fuses might fit but there aren't ten types as far as I know. It would do nicely for split-shot though.
824. Two handled hammer for driving wedges into trees or for splitting stone.
826. Carding machine for wool or cotton.
827. For fitting milk bottle tops or similar. -- Dave Baker Puma Race Engines www.pumaracing.co.uk Camp USA engineer minces about for high performance specialist (4,4,7)
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